• MoralDrift

    I’m gonna go ahead and say it, the Joe Rogan podcast is awesome

  • Anonymous

    I’m gonna go ahead and say it, the Joe Rogan podcast is awesome

  • http://www.sacredgeometryinternational.com/ Camron Wiltshire

    Great team up!  2 prolific avant garde psychonauts and alternative historians!  So glad to see this conversation taking place.  Kudos!

    • http://www.sacredgeometryinternational.com/ Camron Wiltshire

      That was a great podcast.  Love to hear Graham wax poetic with Rogan here.  Bunbu Ryodo is re emerging.  May the stilted academic masses and beyond allow evolution to take it’s rightful course before the next cyclical catastrophe.

  • Camron Wiltshire

    Great team up!  2 prolific avant garde psychonauts and alternative historians!  So glad to see this conversation taking place.  Kudos!

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Its strange how Joe Rogan, someone who seems experienced in the use of DMT can also be a promoter of the brutal macho sport of MMA and the host of “who can eat the most bugs” Fear factor.

    • Intrepidsol22

      The beauty of psychedelics is that the lie of separation can be overcome.  Martial arts when practiced with the desire to transcend one’s personal limits are an extension of yogic discipline in sometimes pugilistic form.  Try to understand it as a ritual for reinstitution of the masculine desire for freedom, strength, and to be tested.  “Macho” is in the eye of the beholder.  Observe Lyoto Machida or Genki Sudo, observe George St. Pierre, poetry in motion, will and discipline wielded by martial magi, then you might understand where the seeming contradictions arise from.

      • Monkey See Monkey Do

        I must confess something. I have been somewhat hypocritical in my last statement. I actually like watching MMA (Im a closet MMA fan). But i dont actually really understand why i like watching it. I know that when i see people in those situations it gets my adrenal gland pumping which then rushes endorphins around my body and i know that happens to everyone else who watches it. But i also understand that this is probably brought about by a primitive instinct for combat (watching these fights probably brings back genetic memories of being a cave man fighting over a morcel of meat). Shouldn’t we as human beings be trying to transcend aspects of ourselves irrespective of whether they were part of us for millenia or have been ingrained in our social psyche.

        By becoming self aware of this we can direct our own evolution instead of being the product of mechanical instincts of the past. But then again maybe MMA is great because it enables people to act out their primal instincts visually instead of in real life.Thoughts?

        Great Podcast by the way, Graham Hancock is fascinating.

        • E.B. Wolf

          I’ve been training martial arts for about ten years now, and a big part of the attraction for me is the almost meditative state I enter when sparring with a training partner. My mind is normally running 1,000 miles an hour every second of the day, so it’s one of the few times when I am able to let my mind truly go blank.

          It’s also a great way to stay in shape, as well as being the best stress reliever I’ve ever encountered. I spar with a close friend 2-3 times a week on average, and our running joke is that when  you have a good friend to punch in the face and kick in the ribs on a regular basis; it’s amazing how much easier it is to not get pissed about life’s little nuisances. 

          • Ronniedobbs

            Rule one, don’t talk about…..

          • Monkey See Monkey Do

            Thanks for that insight

          • you deserve it

            you get mad about little stuff on this site all the time, trolling people and acting the sliced bread. Martial arts is kool well some styles but it also has its disadvantages. Over confidence being one of them and arrogance that even grand masters grapple with. I practiced martial arts as a kid. Now its on to sports with no such direct violence. Like soccer or basketball or even well designed video games. I’m all set with having to grapple with sweaty doods to get my exercise on like you. You should try having sex with a hot woman, trust me its way better then sparring with some dood.

          • E.B. Wolf

            Holy shit, you can sense the emotional reaction in my posts just by reading what I typed? You must have studied under some serious masters to be able to pick up the emotions of commentors through the ether!

            Did you ever consider the possibility that I enjoy a mental sparring match as much as a physical one? 

            For example, I could respond to your post with a statement like, “Choke on a dick and die.” That doesn’t necessarily mean that I’m feeling angry; (I am EB’s Zen-like emotional detachment) I may simply be amused by someone’s piss-poor attempt at a straw man argument- enjoying full contact sparring with a friend= doesn’t get laid- That’s the best you’ve got? Seriously? Really?

            Lastly, I have strong opinions on a lot of topics and I’m not shy about expressing them. If that means that I “act like sliced bread” (???) well then I guess I’m guilty. Congratulations, now go make me a sammich.

        • Ronniedobbs

          Could just be certain repressed or latent sexual tendencies you know….  (just joking…..)

          • Monkey See Monkey Do

            haha, i know good looking girls trying submission moves on eachother looks pretty damn sexy though. Until one of them elbows the other in the head and her face is covered in blood (unless your into that sort of thing of course….)

        • clever screenname

          “In loving the spiritual you cannot despise the earthly” -Joseph Campbell.   I think you should try a martial arts class sometime.  Perhaps jiu jitsu.  It’s incredibly humbling and is a fun way to learn to defend yourself.  This gives one a permanent shift in consciousness/confidence that is noted by those around you on multiple levels of subtlety.  I would say that it is quite alright that part of you enjoys a good battle.  It’s a microcosmic ritual for the struggle to overcome seemingly predefined limits, to merge flesh and spirit with will and intention, truly a magical ritual.  

          Primal instincts are hardwired for a reason.  The martial artist is not acting out simply primal instincts though, they are actually using them to overcome them, namely the grip of fear on the limbic system.  It’s the synthesis of Bunbu Ryodo we really need.  Scholarly Warriors able to transcend fear of death while mastering various art forms.  Here is the reinvocation of Homo Universalis.

        • Nuggett

          Interesting post.  I am not a closet fan, though I steer clear of many of the tatted up, blood-lusting crowd.  I typically buy the more interesting fight cards and watch them on my computer.  I’ve thought a good deal about MMA and how it is implicated in mainstream media as barbaric and uncivilized.  MMA is a fascinating mix of fighting styles put to the test by real athletes.  Most fighters don’t wish enduring harm on their opponents.  The aggressive emotions sometimes displayed are a symptom of the nature of man to man combat, which tests the pride and fear of every contender.  It’s very tense, as I know that you’re aware.  Fighters, of course, sometimes get carried away, and that’s why there are strict rules in place to keep injuries at a minimum.  Truthfully, most serious injuries happen to the fighters when they are training, just as in any other sport.  

          I don’t agree that it is great because it enables people to act out their primal instincts in a controlled environment.  This may be how many uneducated fighters began when the UFC was in its humble beginnings.  It’s great because it is a true test of acumen and strength on display.  It’s honest and bare.  The most gifted fighters are both intelligent and superior physically.  There are thousands of possibilities and scenarios in each fight.  Those are some reasons why I think MMA is a legitimate sport often misinterpreted as an event that satisfies some need for violent animals to vicariously release instincts through fighting in a rules-based environment.  

          • Monkey See Monkey Do

            Thanks for the interesting insight. I remember listening to a Jiu Jitsu practitioner (cant remember his name) who was getting ready for a fight in the UFC, and he said that his goal in every fight was to finish his opponent by doing as less harm to him as possible, and ideally no harm at all. I thought that was pretty interesting and against the grain.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Its strange how Joe Rogan, someone who seems experienced in the use of DMT can also be a promoter of the brutal macho sport of MMA and the host of “who can eat the most bugs” Fear factor.

  • believein1

    Huge fan of the Joe Rogan Experience and your website…to see them both together is awesome!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/James-Chanbonpin/1460775184 James Chanbonpin

    Huge fan of the Joe Rogan Experience and your website…to see them both together is awesome!

  • Intrepidsol22

    The beauty of psychedelics is that the lie of separation can be overcome.  Martial arts when practiced with the desire to transcend one’s personal limits are an extension of yogic discipline in sometimes pugilistic form.  Try to understand it as a ritual for reinstitution of the masculine desire for freedom, strength, and to be tested.  “Macho” is in the eye of the beholder.  Observe Lyoto Machida or Genki Sudo, observe George St. Pierre, poetry in motion, will and discipline wielded by martial magi, then you might understand where the seeming contradictions arise from.

  • Camron Wiltshire

    That was a great podcast.  Love to hear Graham wax poetic with Rogan here.  Bunbu Ryodo is re emerging.  May the stilted academic masses and beyond allow evolution to take it’s rightful course before the next cyclical catastrophe.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    I must confess something. I have been somewhat hypocritical in my last statement. I actually like watching MMA (Im a closet MMA fan). But i dont actually really understand why i like watching it. I know that when i see people in those situations it gets my adrenal gland pumping which then rushes endorphins around my body and i know that happens to everyone else who watches it. But i also understand that this is probably brought about by a primitive instinct for combat (watching these fights probably brings back genetic memories of being a cave man fighting over a morcel of meat). Shouldn’t we as human beings be trying to transcend aspects of ourselves irrespective of whether they were part of us for millenia or have been ingrained in our social psyche.

    By becoming self aware of this we can direct our own evolution instead of being the product of mechanical instincts of the past. But then again maybe MMA is great because it enables people to act out their primal instincts visually instead of in real life.Thoughts?

    Great Podcast by the way, Graham Hancock is fascinating.

  • E.B. Wolf

    I’ve been training martial arts for about ten years now, and a big part of the attraction for me is the almost meditative state I enter when sparring with a training partner. My mind is normally running 1,000 miles an hour every second of the day, so it’s one of the few times when I am able to let my mind truly go blank.

    It’s also a great way to stay in shape, as well as being the best stress reliever I’ve ever encountered. I spar with a close friend 2-3 times a week on average, and our running joke is that when  you have a good friend to punch in the face and kick in the ribs on a regular basis; it’s amazing how much easier it is to not get pissed about life’s little nuisances. 

  • Ronniedobbs

    Could just be certain repressed or latent sexual tendencies you know….  (just joking…..)

  • Ronniedobbs

    Rule one, don’t talk about…..

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    haha, i know good looking girls trying submission moves on eachother looks pretty damn sexy though. Until one of them elbows the other in the head and her face is covered in blood (unless your into that sort of thing of course….)

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Thanks for that insight

  • Marijnterbeek

    what an incredible man, Hancock.  

  • Marijnterbeek

    what an incredible man, Hancock.  

  • Voodooplex

    great show, well worth the time…so good to hear graham speaking freely, without being handicapped by the likes of that incompetent plant george noory.

  • Voodooplex

    great show, well worth the time…so good to hear graham speaking freely, without being handicapped by the likes of that incompetent plant george noory.

  • clever screenname

    “In loving the spiritual you cannot despise the earthly” -Joseph Campbell.   I think you should try a martial arts class sometime.  Perhaps jiu jitsu.  It’s incredibly humbling and is a fun way to learn to defend yourself.  This gives one a permanent shift in consciousness/confidence that is noted by those around you on multiple levels of subtlety.  I would say that it is quite alright that part of you enjoys a good battle.  It’s a microcosmic ritual for the struggle to overcome seemingly predefined limits, to merge flesh and spirit with will and intention, truly a magical ritual.  

    Primal instincts are hardwired for a reason.  The martial artist is not acting out simply primal instincts though, they are actually using them to overcome them, namely the grip of fear on the limbic system.  It’s the synthesis of Bunbu Ryodo we really need.  Scholarly Warriors able to transcend fear of death while mastering various art forms.  Here is the reinvocation of Homo Universalis.

  • Constructivedialog

    I found the interview with Graham Hancock interesting, and I enjoyed listening to it.  I always like to be open to new ideas. 

    My friend, Herman Bender — look here for a brief bio on him:  http://www.bahsil.org/HBenderBio.pdf  — had this to say about Graham Hancock’s work, which is worth at least pondering.

    ( Please note:  I offer this for your consideration, but I do not wish to receive emails in response, for I am not an expert in these things; simply ponder Herman has to say, read some of Herman’s original work if you wish, and draw your own conclusions on your own )

    Here goes:

    What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but
    I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is
    a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my
    experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw
    completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or
    world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is
    where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote
    earlier this year in a larger article:

    Constellations

    Besides ascribing to the Theory of Selective
    Glacial Intelligence, one other fatal mistake some adherents of archeoastronomy make is to compare
    western constellations, those subjective dot-to-dot patterns one can make with stars in
    the night sky, to shapes the American Indians saw or interpreted.  This is not only Eurocentric,
    it just plain wrong.  It is true that to both cultures the constellations are steeped in
    mythology and legends, but

    that is where the similarities end.  The word constellation comes from the Latin literally meaning
    “stars together”.87  How long human beings have been ‘connecting the dots’ amongst the
    stars is not certain,

    but certainly something on the order of 6000 years and likely far
    more.88  There is conjecture that it may even go back 30,000 – 50,000 years to the
    days of the cave bear cult.  If so, it is linked to the number seven and Ursa Major, a
    reoccurring element in a number of cosmologies spread, like the circumpolar bear cult,
    across the northern hemisphere.89  Ursa Major, the Great Bear or Big Dipper is one of
    the only constellations that shares similarities with both Indo-European and some American
    Indian cosmologies.  Only a select few tribes or cultures saw Ursa Major as a bear.
      Amongst the Plains people Ursa Major was seen, with seasonal variations, as a ladle, funeral
    procession and bier, a place where the Blue Woman dwells or even the “Hairy Elephant”!90  The western constellation convention that we call Taurus the bull
    is another example of the subjective view of connecting dots and seeing what the mind
    conjures.  The bull’s head came down to us from Greek and Roman sources.  But in
    Indonesia it is seen as a nut cracker based on a culturally important food source and tool
    that may indicate a seasonal use; a crocodile skull in New Guinea; a wolf’ head in
    Germany; a tapir’s head in South America and a bull’s jaw in Babylonia, perhaps the place
    where the ancient Greek’s bull association with Taurus actually originated.91  Here
    in our corner of North America, what we call Taurus may well have been envisioned as an
    atlatl wielding, bison-headed giant man (Figure 11).92  86 Mlodinow 2008:45.  87 Asimov 1990:17.  88 Cornelius 1997:10-11, Gurshtein 1995:28-33.  89 Gurshtein 1997:50.   Also discussed in the power point
    presentation for the international Circumpolar Bear Cult exhibit in Pinerolo, Italy, November, 2009. 90   See Lakota Star Knowledge and other references on the Lakota or
    Sioux celestial view. Loela One Feather, personal communication.  91 Asimov 1990:17.  20

    One constellation, Orion, is overwhelmingly confused by those
    thinking only with the western mind with the Greek and Roman association of stars grouped
    into an image of the hunter.  Before the ancient Greeks co-opted it, the stellar
    ideal of Orion almost certainly represented Osiris, likely originating in ancient
    Egypt.93  True, it is probably the best known constellation other than the Big Dipper, Ursa Major,
    but let us not confuse apples with oranges.  It was not seen anywhere in North America as
    a giant hunter.  To the Lakota or Sioux, it was “the hand” or a giant bison depending
    again on the season of the year.94  The Tsistsista saw only parts of it, the bright stars
    Betelgeuse as a red wolf and Rigel as a blue kit fox.95  Others looked at the three stars of
    what we call Orion’s

    ‘belt’ and related them to deer, antelope or sheep.96   The problem of confusing the ancient, club-wielding hunter Orion
    with what the American Indians saw is something to keep in mind before roaming
    the countryside

    looking for any three boulders appearing to be in a row and then
    claiming they are an ancient alignment representing Orion’s belt.  To make these
    amateurish claims is just more Eurocentric thinking with little or no understanding of the
    complexity of indigenous cultures or their cosmological view.  It also illustrates a lack of
    any real astronomical knowledge beyond what is taught in a grade school astronomy class. 
    A serious student of archeoastronomy should expect and express far more.

  • Constructivedialog

    I found the interview with Graham Hancock interesting, and I enjoyed listening to it.  I always like to be open to new ideas. 

    My friend, Herman Bender — look here for a brief bio on him:  http://www.bahsil.org/HBenderBio.pdf  — had this to say about Graham Hancock’s work, which is worth at least pondering.

    ( Please note:  I offer this for your consideration, but I do not wish to receive emails in response, for I am not an expert in these things; simply ponder Herman has to say, read some of Herman’s original work if you wish, and draw your own conclusions on your own )

    Here goes:

    What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but
    I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is
    a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my
    experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw
    completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or
    world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is
    where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote
    earlier this year in a larger article:

    Constellations

    Besides ascribing to the Theory of Selective
    Glacial Intelligence, one other fatal mistake some adherents of archeoastronomy make is to compare
    western constellations, those subjective dot-to-dot patterns one can make with stars in
    the night sky, to shapes the American Indians saw or interpreted.  This is not only Eurocentric,
    it just plain wrong.  It is true that to both cultures the constellations are steeped in
    mythology and legends, but

    that is where the similarities end.  The word constellation comes from the Latin literally meaning
    “stars together”.87  How long human beings have been ‘connecting the dots’ amongst the
    stars is not certain,

    but certainly something on the order of 6000 years and likely far
    more.88  There is conjecture that it may even go back 30,000 – 50,000 years to the
    days of the cave bear cult.  If so, it is linked to the number seven and Ursa Major, a
    reoccurring element in a number of cosmologies spread, like the circumpolar bear cult,
    across the northern hemisphere.89  Ursa Major, the Great Bear or Big Dipper is one of
    the only constellations that shares similarities with both Indo-European and some American
    Indian cosmologies.  Only a select few tribes or cultures saw Ursa Major as a bear.
      Amongst the Plains people Ursa Major was seen, with seasonal variations, as a ladle, funeral
    procession and bier, a place where the Blue Woman dwells or even the “Hairy Elephant”!90  The western constellation convention that we call Taurus the bull
    is another example of the subjective view of connecting dots and seeing what the mind
    conjures.  The bull’s head came down to us from Greek and Roman sources.  But in
    Indonesia it is seen as a nut cracker based on a culturally important food source and tool
    that may indicate a seasonal use; a crocodile skull in New Guinea; a wolf’ head in
    Germany; a tapir’s head in South America and a bull’s jaw in Babylonia, perhaps the place
    where the ancient Greek’s bull association with Taurus actually originated.91  Here
    in our corner of North America, what we call Taurus may well have been envisioned as an
    atlatl wielding, bison-headed giant man (Figure 11).92  86 Mlodinow 2008:45.  87 Asimov 1990:17.  88 Cornelius 1997:10-11, Gurshtein 1995:28-33.  89 Gurshtein 1997:50.   Also discussed in the power point
    presentation for the international Circumpolar Bear Cult exhibit in Pinerolo, Italy, November, 2009. 90   See Lakota Star Knowledge and other references on the Lakota or
    Sioux celestial view. Loela One Feather, personal communication.  91 Asimov 1990:17.  20

    One constellation, Orion, is overwhelmingly confused by those
    thinking only with the western mind with the Greek and Roman association of stars grouped
    into an image of the hunter.  Before the ancient Greeks co-opted it, the stellar
    ideal of Orion almost certainly represented Osiris, likely originating in ancient
    Egypt.93  True, it is probably the best known constellation other than the Big Dipper, Ursa Major,
    but let us not confuse apples with oranges.  It was not seen anywhere in North America as
    a giant hunter.  To the Lakota or Sioux, it was “the hand” or a giant bison depending
    again on the season of the year.94  The Tsistsista saw only parts of it, the bright stars
    Betelgeuse as a red wolf and Rigel as a blue kit fox.95  Others looked at the three stars of
    what we call Orion’s

    ‘belt’ and related them to deer, antelope or sheep.96   The problem of confusing the ancient, club-wielding hunter Orion
    with what the American Indians saw is something to keep in mind before roaming
    the countryside

    looking for any three boulders appearing to be in a row and then
    claiming they are an ancient alignment representing Orion’s belt.  To make these
    amateurish claims is just more Eurocentric thinking with little or no understanding of the
    complexity of indigenous cultures or their cosmological view.  It also illustrates a lack of
    any real astronomical knowledge beyond what is taught in a grade school astronomy class. 
    A serious student of archeoastronomy should expect and express far more.

  • Constructivedialog

    I found the interview with Graham Hancock interesting, and I enjoyed listening to it.  I always like to be open to new ideas. 

    My friend, Herman Bender — look here for a brief bio on him:  http://www.bahsil.org/HBenderBio.pdf  — had this to say about Graham Hancock’s work, which is worth at least pondering.

    ( Please note:  I offer this for your consideration, but I do not wish to receive emails in response, for I am not an expert in these things; simply ponder Herman has to say, read some of Herman’s original work if you wish, and draw your own conclusions on your own )

    Here goes:

    What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but
    I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is
    a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my
    experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw
    completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or
    world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is
    where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote
    earlier this year in a larger article:

    Constellations

    Besides ascribing to the Theory of Selective
    Glacial Intelligence, one other fatal mistake some adherents of archeoastronomy make is to compare
    western constellations, those subjective dot-to-dot patterns one can make with stars in
    the night sky, to shapes the American Indians saw or interpreted.  This is not only Eurocentric,
    it just plain wrong.  It is true that to both cultures the constellations are steeped in
    mythology and legends, but

    that is where the similarities end.  The word constellation comes from the Latin literally meaning
    “stars together”.87  How long human beings have been ‘connecting the dots’ amongst the
    stars is not certain,

    but certainly something on the order of 6000 years and likely far
    more.88  There is conjecture that it may even go back 30,000 – 50,000 years to the
    days of the cave bear cult.  If so, it is linked to the number seven and Ursa Major, a
    reoccurring element in a number of cosmologies spread, like the circumpolar bear cult,
    across the northern hemisphere.89  Ursa Major, the Great Bear or Big Dipper is one of
    the only constellations that shares similarities with both Indo-European and some American
    Indian cosmologies.  Only a select few tribes or cultures saw Ursa Major as a bear.
      Amongst the Plains people Ursa Major was seen, with seasonal variations, as a ladle, funeral
    procession and bier, a place where the Blue Woman dwells or even the “Hairy Elephant”!90  The western constellation convention that we call Taurus the bull
    is another example of the subjective view of connecting dots and seeing what the mind
    conjures.  The bull’s head came down to us from Greek and Roman sources.  But in
    Indonesia it is seen as a nut cracker based on a culturally important food source and tool
    that may indicate a seasonal use; a crocodile skull in New Guinea; a wolf’ head in
    Germany; a tapir’s head in South America and a bull’s jaw in Babylonia, perhaps the place
    where the ancient Greek’s bull association with Taurus actually originated.91  Here
    in our corner of North America, what we call Taurus may well have been envisioned as an
    atlatl wielding, bison-headed giant man (Figure 11).92  86 Mlodinow 2008:45.  87 Asimov 1990:17.  88 Cornelius 1997:10-11, Gurshtein 1995:28-33.  89 Gurshtein 1997:50.   Also discussed in the power point
    presentation for the international Circumpolar Bear Cult exhibit in Pinerolo, Italy, November, 2009. 90   See Lakota Star Knowledge and other references on the Lakota or
    Sioux celestial view. Loela One Feather, personal communication.  91 Asimov 1990:17.  20

    One constellation, Orion, is overwhelmingly confused by those
    thinking only with the western mind with the Greek and Roman association of stars grouped
    into an image of the hunter.  Before the ancient Greeks co-opted it, the stellar
    ideal of Orion almost certainly represented Osiris, likely originating in ancient
    Egypt.93  True, it is probably the best known constellation other than the Big Dipper, Ursa Major,
    but let us not confuse apples with oranges.  It was not seen anywhere in North America as
    a giant hunter.  To the Lakota or Sioux, it was “the hand” or a giant bison depending
    again on the season of the year.94  The Tsistsista saw only parts of it, the bright stars
    Betelgeuse as a red wolf and Rigel as a blue kit fox.95  Others looked at the three stars of
    what we call Orion’s

    ‘belt’ and related them to deer, antelope or sheep.96   The problem of confusing the ancient, club-wielding hunter Orion
    with what the American Indians saw is something to keep in mind before roaming
    the countryside

    looking for any three boulders appearing to be in a row and then
    claiming they are an ancient alignment representing Orion’s belt.  To make these
    amateurish claims is just more Eurocentric thinking with little or no understanding of the
    complexity of indigenous cultures or their cosmological view.  It also illustrates a lack of
    any real astronomical knowledge beyond what is taught in a grade school astronomy class. 
    A serious student of archeoastronomy should expect and express far more.

    • Clever Screenname

      “What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but

      I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is

      a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my

      experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw

      completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or

      world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is

      where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote

      earlier this year in a larger article:

      From the above quote and from the portions of the article you cite it doesn’t appear that he is saying anything relevant to Graham’s actual research or theories.  Perhaps if he were to actually cite a claim of Graham’s and then seek to refute it would better serve the process of constructive dialog.  At this point it just appears to be a seeming gross oversimplification, and misunderstanding, of the scientific evidence defining the precessional motion of or our planet and the numerous sacred temples, mounds, etc which mathematically encode this knowledge within their structures.  Stone textbooks of Astronomical knowledge which also serve to mark out celestial motion.  Hardly a coincidence.

      This is the crux of Graham’s argument and it is not in dispute outside of Egyptologists who apparently also do not understand precession or geology well enough to make effective refutation. 

  • Constructivedialog

    Let me add this, as well:  In my view, Hancock is right about having sovereignty over our own consciousness. 

    And perhaps many of his other ideas are correct, as well.

    Though I do feel no one person, nor any one group of people, have all the answers.  In fact, all of humanity’s knowledge as whole, collectively, is severely incomplete.  But a drop in the bucket, so to speak.

    Peace!

  • Constructivedialog

    Let me add this, as well:  In my view, Hancock is right about having sovereignty over our own consciousness. 

    And perhaps many of his other ideas are correct, as well.

    Though I do feel no one person, nor any one group of people, have all the answers.  In fact, all of humanity’s knowledge as whole, collectively, is severely incomplete.  But a drop in the bucket, so to speak.

    Peace!

  • Constructivedialog

    Let me add this, as well:  In my view, Hancock is right about having sovereignty over our own consciousness. 

    And perhaps many of his other ideas are correct, as well.

    Though I do feel no one person, nor any one group of people, have all the answers.  In fact, all of humanity’s knowledge as whole, collectively, is severely incomplete.  But a drop in the bucket, so to speak.

    Peace!

  • phreakwhenseas

    Really great interview, still listening to it now

    I’ve always loved listening to Graham, he’s just fascinating. The only thing i don’t agree with is what he said about not ordering ayahuasca ingredients and doing it yourself. Of course its not for everyone, and i would LOVE to go to the amazon, but many people like me simply can’t afford it or don’t have the opportunity in our life situation. To me ayahuasca is reaching its vines out to the world for a reason- the world needs it. These dimensions are all of our birthright, not just the shamans in the amazon or the people who can afford to go to the amazon.. myself and many many western people have taken it dozens of times by ourselves or with others in a good context and built a beautiful and positive relationship with it.

    • Monkey See Monkey Do

      I hear ya on that. Having used dmt quite often and being involved in the culture it does seem there is a viable psychedelic culture emerging within the west. On the other hand i see where Graham Hancock is coming from, he needs to be responsible in what he says so he doesn’t promote reckless behaviour. The MAOI ingredient in DMT can be quite deadly if taken with the wrong food or medication.

      Ayauscha and DMT are extremely powerful and deserve great respect. Shamanic cultures that never disconnected from the plant teachers have thousands of years of knowledge and spiritual practice over cultures that have disconnected with them. I dont know if DMT is for everyone, but i do know that DMT and the rituals around it need to be protected and only offered to those seeking it.

      • Monkey See Monkey Do

        Correction = The MAOI ingredient in Ayahuaca* eh, im tired.

  • phreakwhenseas

    Really great interview, still listening to it now

    I’ve always loved listening to Graham, he’s just fascinating. The only thing i don’t agree with is what he said about not ordering ayahuasca ingredients and doing it yourself. Of course its not for everyone, and i would LOVE to go to the amazon, but many people like me simply can’t afford it or don’t have the opportunity in our life situation. To me ayahuasca is reaching its vines out to the world for a reason- the world needs it. These dimensions are all of our birthright, not just the shamans in the amazon or the people who can afford to go to the amazon.. myself and many many western people have taken it dozens of times by ourselves or with others in a good context and built a beautiful and positive relationship with it.

  • Big_easy213

    The most insightful conversation to have ever taken place with a fleshlight in the background.

  • Big_easy213

    The most insightful conversation to have ever taken place with a fleshlight in the background.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    I hear ya on that. Having used dmt quite often and being involved in the culture it does seem there is a viable psychedelic culture emerging within the west. On the other hand i see where Graham Hancock is coming from, he needs to be responsible in what he says so he doesn’t promote reckless behaviour. The MAOI ingredient in DMT can be quite deadly if taken with the wrong food or medication.

    Ayauscha and DMT are extremely powerful and deserve great respect. Shamanic cultures that never disconnected from the plant teachers have thousands of years of knowledge and spiritual practice over cultures that have disconnected with them. I dont know if DMT is for everyone, but i do know that DMT and the rituals around it need to be protected and only offered to those seeking it.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Correction = The MAOI ingredient in Ayahuaca* eh, im tired.

  • Nuggett

    Interesting post.  I am not a closet fan, though I steer clear of many of the tatted up, blood-lusting crowd.  I typically buy the more interesting fight cards and watch them on my computer.  I’ve thought a good deal about MMA and how it is implicated in mainstream media as barbaric and uncivilized.  MMA is a fascinating mix of fighting styles put to the test by real athletes.  Most fighters don’t wish enduring harm on their opponents.  The aggressive emotions sometimes displayed are a symptom of the nature of man to man combat, which tests the pride and fear of every contender.  It’s very tense, as I know that you’re aware.  Fighters, of course, sometimes get carried away, and that’s why there are strict rules in place to keep injuries at a minimum.  Truthfully, most serious injuries happen to the fighters when they are training, just as in any other sport.  

    I don’t agree that it is great because it enables people to act out their primal instincts in a controlled environment.  This may be how many uneducated fighters began when the UFC was in its humble beginnings.  It’s great because it is a true test of acumen and strength on display.  It’s honest and bare.  The most gifted fighters are both intelligent and superior physically.  There are thousands of possibilities and scenarios in each fight.  Those are some reasons why I think MMA is a legitimate sport often misinterpreted as an event that satisfies some need for violent animals to vicariously release instincts through fighting in a rules-based environment.  

  • Clever Screenname

    “What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but

    I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is

    a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my

    experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw

    completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or

    world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is

    where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote

    earlier this year in a larger article:

    From the above quote and from the portions of the article you cite it doesn’t appear that he is saying anything relevant to Graham’s actual research or theories.  Perhaps if he were to actually cite a claim of Graham’s and then seek to refute it would better serve the process of constructive dialog.  At this point it just appears to be a seeming gross oversimplification, and misunderstanding, of the scientific evidence defining the precessional motion of or our planet and the numerous sacred temples, mounds, etc which mathematically encode this knowledge within their structures.  Stone textbooks of Astronomical knowledge which also serve to mark out celestial motion.  Hardly a coincidence.

    This is the crux of Graham’s argument and it is not in dispute outside of Egyptologists who apparently also do not understand precession or geology well enough to make effective refutation. 

  • Clever Screenname

    “What Graham Hancock says makes for good reading and excites the imagination, but

    I don’t place a lot of stock in it.  The problem to me is that it is

    a ‘one size fits all’ way of looking at things, and it has been my

    experience that different cultures looked at the same stars and saw

    completely different images, if any.  There is no pan astronomy or

    world-wide way of viewing the celestial realm.   To me, that is

    where Graham and many have gone wrong.  Below is what I wrote

    earlier this year in a larger article:

    From the above quote and from the portions of the article you cite it doesn’t appear that he is saying anything relevant to Graham’s actual research or theories.  Perhaps if he were to actually cite a claim of Graham’s and then seek to refute it would better serve the process of constructive dialog.  At this point it just appears to be a seeming gross oversimplification, and misunderstanding, of the scientific evidence defining the precessional motion of or our planet and the numerous sacred temples, mounds, etc which mathematically encode this knowledge within their structures.  Stone textbooks of Astronomical knowledge which also serve to mark out celestial motion.  Hardly a coincidence.

    This is the crux of Graham’s argument and it is not in dispute outside of Egyptologists who apparently also do not understand precession or geology well enough to make effective refutation. 

  • Masflojo

    I really enjoyed this. I will only say one thing, Hancock talks about the brain only receiving consciousness, not generating it and how him and many like him, believe we will continually exist in different realms after our physical bodies die; I think that its interesting and fun to think about, however, I think like all religions its just man wanting to live forever, not be confined to this short life as a mortal and I think its all bunk. I think we have this life and that’s it, so make the best of it. 

    • Archielito07

      You need to open up your mind…. I dont understand how you put so much belief in life being just a meaningless accident. The chances of us being alive are astonomical. Everyday the universe is in a perfect constant balance. Think about it…. If the moon wasnt there or if it was a little to far we wouldnt exist, if the earth didnt have a magnetic field we would get fried, if the earth was just a little farther or closer to the sun we wouldnt be able to have liquid water…. If the earth differed more then 2 degrees on its axis  we wouldnt exist, do I have to keep going? If plants didnt exale oxygen and inhale co2 we wouldnt exist….. Its very evident to me that the universe is working for us, everyday of our lives thanks to God himself. Its simply not all an accident if you believe it is then you are just naive and are no different.

      • Elmyr23

        Don’t be scared of the choas. One would think that your god gave up on the dinosaurs then. If the past had not added up to the present something else would be here more than likely , considering the large numbers of varying life on earth. Earth is not as rare as we may think and DNA is traveling through space right now. I think the chances of us being a live aren’t as crazy as you might think, but then again I think they found fossils of bacteria on a rock from mars.

  • Masflojo

    I really enjoyed this. I will only say one thing, Hancock talks about the brain only receiving consciousness, not generating it and how him and many like him, believe we will continually exist in different realms after our physical bodies die; I think that its interesting and fun to think about, however, I think like all religions its just man wanting to live forever, not be confined to this short life as a mortal and I think its all bunk. I think we have this life and that’s it, so make the best of it. 

  • Oneloveinus

    “…but i just had to look, having read the book” and a tremendous book it is, “Fingerprints of the God’s.” It’s guys like the ones in this room having this discussion that give me hope, that the fuck up’s in the world who destroy everything for personal gain..the Earth, cultures, structures….and so forth is just a phase of primordial unconsciousness that will undoubtedly be outgrown and washed away through the passage of time and the growth of the collective consciousness will eradicate the closed minded anti-spiritual tendencies currently dominating the world because at some point not too long ago we had to start over from scratch..and it only takes a few asshole’s to wake up…and then everyone’s awake….and I’m using the term “asshole’s” in this instance in the most decent way.

  • Oneloveinus

    “…but i just had to look, having read the book” and a tremendous book it is, “Fingerprints of the God’s.” It’s guys like the ones in this room having this discussion that give me hope, that the fuck up’s in the world who destroy everything for personal gain..the Earth, cultures, structures….and so forth is just a phase of primordial unconsciousness that will undoubtedly be outgrown and washed away through the passage of time and the growth of the collective consciousness will eradicate the closed minded anti-spiritual tendencies currently dominating the world because at some point not too long ago we had to start over from scratch..and it only takes a few asshole’s to wake up…and then everyone’s awake….and I’m using the term “asshole’s” in this instance in the most decent way.

  • http://twitter.com/piphd Pi PhD PiALOGUE

    The erosion of the Sphinx could have been from “sand” blowing instead of “water” flowing which would have a similar effect.  Or, it could be a combination of both.  My point being that sand would erode rock a LOT faster than water would.

  • http://twitter.com/piphd Pi PhD PiALOGUE

    The erosion of the Sphinx could have been from “sand” blowing instead of “water” flowing which would have a similar effect.  Or, it could be a combination of both.  My point being that sand would erode rock a LOT faster than water would.

    • Clever Screenname

       You may want to study the work of Robert Schoch.  As an eminent geologist he would beg to differ with you on that point.  http://www.robertschoch.com/sphinxcontent.html

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Thanks for the interesting insight. I remember listening to a Jiu Jitsu practitioner (cant remember his name) who was getting ready for a fight in the UFC, and he said that his goal in every fight was to finish his opponent by doing as less harm to him as possible, and ideally no harm at all. I thought that was pretty interesting and against the grain.

  • Clever Screenname

     You may want to study the work of Robert Schoch.  As an eminent geologist he would beg to differ with you on that point.  http://www.robertschoch.com/sphinxcontent.html

  • MileHigh420

    “We need to have the right to make our own mistakes.” Right on!

  • MileHigh420

    “We need to have the right to make our own mistakes.” Right on!

  • MileHigh420

    “We need to have the right to make our own mistakes.” Right on!

  • MileHigh420

    “We need to have the right to make our own mistakes.” Right on!

  • Archielito07

    You need to open up your mind…. I dont understand how you put so much belief in life being just a meaningless accident. The chances of us being alive are astonomical. Everyday the universe is in a perfect constant balance. Think about it…. If the moon wasnt there or if it was a little to far we wouldnt exist, if the earth didnt have a magnetic field we would get fried, if the earth was just a little farther or closer to the sun we wouldnt be able to have liquid water…. If the earth differed more then 2 degrees on its axis  we wouldnt exist, do I have to keep going? If plants didnt exale oxygen and inhale co2 we wouldnt exist….. Its very evident to me that the universe is working for us, everyday of our lives thanks to God himself. Its simply not all an accident if you believe it is then you are just naive and are no different.

  • russell maycumber

    That cycle of creativity appears to mirror phases of chemicals under catalysts like heat.  I guess I am talking about alchemy.

  • russell maycumber

    That cycle of creativity appears to mirror phases of chemicals under catalysts like heat.  I guess I am talking about alchemy.

  • Iuniussmith

    He is very Great Experience with Graham Hancock.
    http://www.gamedevid.org/forum/member.php?u=11191

  • Anonymous

    He is very Great Experience with Graham Hancock.
    http://www.gamedevid.org/forum/member.php?u=11191

  • you deserve it

    you get mad about little stuff on this site all the time, trolling people and acting the sliced bread. Martial arts is kool well some styles but it also has its disadvantages. Over confidence being one of them and arrogance that even grand masters grapple with. I practiced martial arts as a kid. Now its on to sports with no such direct violence. Like soccer or basketball or even well designed video games. I’m all set with having to grapple with sweaty doods to get my exercise on like you. You should try having sex with a hot woman, trust me its way better then sparring with some dood.

  • iPINCH

    Finger prints of the gods!!! READ IT 

  • iPINCH

    Finger prints of the gods!!! READ IT 

  • Elmyr23

    Don’t be scared of the choas. One would think that your god gave up on the dinosaurs then. If the past had not added up to the present something else would be here more than likely , considering the large numbers of varying life on earth. Earth is not as rare as we may think and DNA is traveling through space right now. I think the chances of us being a live aren’t as crazy as you might think, but then again I think they found fossils of bacteria on a rock from mars.

  • E.B. Wolf

    Holy shit, you can sense the emotional reaction in my posts just by reading what I typed? You must have studied under some serious masters to be able to pick up the emotions of commentors through the ether!

    Did you ever consider the possibility that I enjoy a mental sparring match as much as a physical one? 

    For example, I could respond to your post with a statement like, “Choke on a dick and die.” That doesn’t necessarily mean that I’m feeling angry; (I am EB’s Zen-like emotional detachment) I may simply be amused by someone’s piss-poor attempt at a straw man argument- enjoying full contact sparring with a friend= doesn’t get laid- That’s the best you’ve got? Seriously? Really?

    Lastly, I have strong opinions on a lot of topics and I’m not shy about expressing them. If that means that I “act like sliced bread” (???) well then I guess I’m guilty. Congratulations, now go make me a sammich.

  • Guest

    Rogan’s gotta be WHACKED out on this. I can’t blame him, I’d be too if I were having a one on one with Graham Hancock. It’d probably “extra” blow your mind.

  • Guest

    Rogan’s gotta be WHACKED out on this. I can’t blame him, I’d be too if I were having a one on one with Graham Hancock. It’d probably “extra” blow your mind.

21
More in Alternatives, Consciousness, Drugs, Graham Hancock, Joe Rogan, Podcasts, Spirituality
Cleaning up the Religion Debate

Lately there have been a few articles on Disinfo that eventually, either immediately or after a few days, spurred an argument that rears its head fairly often here. The debate...

Close