Troy Davis Executed in Georgia

Troy DavisReports the AP via CBS News:

Georgia executed Troy Davis on Wednesday night for the murder of an off-duty police officer, a crime he denied committing right to the end as supporters around the world mourned and declared that an innocent man was put to death.

Defiant to the end, he told relatives of Mark MacPhail that his 1989 slaying was not his fault. “I did not have a gun,” he insisted. “For those about to take my life,” he told prison officials, “may God have mercy on your souls. May God bless your souls.”

Davis was declared dead at 11:08 ET. The lethal injection began about 15 minutes earlier, after the Supreme Court rejected an 11th-hour request for a stay. The court did not comment on its order, which came about four hours after it received the request and more than three hours after the planned execution time.

Though Davis’ attorneys said seven of nine key witnesses against him disputed all or parts of their testimony, state and federal judges repeatedly ruled against granting him a new trial. As the court losses piled up Wednesday, his offer to take a polygraph test was rejected and the pardons board refused to give him one more hearing.

More on the AP via CBS News

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  • Wanooski

    He was on trial for killing a cop(I have no idea if he actually did it, and witness testimony points to him not doing it), and he is black. In the South. Given those circumstances, was there any other way this could have turned out? 

  • Anarchy Pony

    He was on trial for killing a cop(I have no idea if he actually did it, and witness testimony points to him not doing it), and he is black. In the South. Given those circumstances, was there any other way this could have turned out? 

    • Bwoodriver

      Yes///he could have been found not guilty!

    • Tessa Brock

      That is a lot of prejudice in such a small statement.

      • Redacted

        Lots of prejudice in the South.

      • Jin The Ninja

        not really. racism in the south is easily verifiable by the meagerest of statistics and the most cursory knowledge of american history.

        • Tuna Ghost

          I’m not doubting that racism is common in the south, but I’ve found the north to have just as much prejudice and discrimination.  

          http://www.sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/rd_stateratesofincbyraceandethnicity.pdf

          These statistics seem to indicate, unless I’m reading them wrong, that the South does not have a higher incarceration rate for black people.  

          • emperorreagan

            No doubt that the entire judicial system is slanted against African-Americans, with the popular example of disparate drug sentencing laws being one of the more blatant used to illustrate that point.

            The death penalty, too, is disproportionately sought in cases where the defendant is black and in particular cases where the defendant is black and the victim(s) are white.  And convictions also, unsurprisingly, show the same racial bias.  There are also complicating issues with respect to the competence of legal council for the defense, mental health issues, etc. in many of these cases.

            The biggest issue with this being in the south is that 80%+ of all executions conducted since the death penalty was reinstated have occurred in the south.  There seems to be a rush to kill in the south – Texas is only in the middle of the pack in death penalty sentencing rates, but leads the nation in actually carrying out executions.  The governments in the rest of the country seem somewhat more reluctant to put people to death and/or have more laborious legal processes to get to that point.  In the south, though, it seems that you’d need Jesus to appear to the governor and prison boards to demand that an execution be stopped.  And MAYBE they’d listen to Jesus, but he’d also have to tell them that he wasn’t willing to forgive this particular sin.

          • Tuna Ghost

            The biggest issue with this being in the south is that 80%+ of all executions conducted since the death penalty was reinstated have occurred in the south.  There seems to be a rush to kill in the south – Texas is only in the middle of the pack in death penalty sentencing rates, but leads the nation in actually carrying out executions.  

            I’m wondering how much Texas skews the stats.  I could research it, but I’m pretty damn lazy.

          • emperorreagan

            Since it’s still in my browsing history when I looked it up yesterday to verify my information before posting:

            There have been 1,269 executions since the death penalty was reinstated.  475 have been in Texas.

            So the skew isn’t quite as enormous when you exclude Texas.  However, Virginia has executed 109, which is in the ballpark of the next closest region (the midwest at 149).

            Here’s the total breakdown by region:
            South – 1042
            Midwest – 149
            West – 74
            Northeast – 4

            If you exclude Texas and Virginia’s combined 584 executions from everything, the south still accounts for 458 executions (still over 60% of the remaining executions).

          • emperorreagan

            Also interesting – Virginia is #1 since 1608, with ~1385.
            Texas is #2, with ~1,221.
            New York is #3, with ~1,130 (0 in the modern era).
            Pennsylvania is #4, with ~1,043 (3 in the modern era).
            Georgia is #5, with ~999.

            Numbers were through March of this year, so they have obviously gone up in the case of Texas, Virginia, and Georgia.  I don’t recall hearing about any in PA.  Texas is clearly trying to overtake #1, and that’s with the eastern states having a head state – the data for TX starts in 1819, while Virginia goes back to 1608.

          • Jin The Ninja

            you know i’d never claim racism is less severe in northern reaches, i am just referring to the tradition and history of racism in the south which is very overt.

            and while a good measure-incarceration rates are only one statistic, my thoughts in writing the above were statistics about poverty which is also another indicator.

            http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/new-economy/2011/0913/South-bears-the-brunt-of-America-s-rising-poverty-rate

            http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/oct/07_0091.htm

            If you take data A, and overlap it on data B- it forms a clear picture that poverty in the US is highly concentrated in the south, and in the south there is a very distinct inequality between PoCs and “white” people.

          • Tuna Ghost

            you know i’d never claim racism is less severe in northern reaches, i am just referring to the tradition and history of racism in the south which is very overt.

            On the plus side, the race discussion is very front-and-center (as is the racism), rather than subdued as in the north.

            and while a good measure-incarceration rates are only one statistic, my thoughts in writing the above were statistics about poverty which is also another indicator.

            Hmm touche sir

          • Jin The Ninja

            I agree that there is a ‘benefit’ to having racism overt, rather than subtle. I live in the land of passive aggressive and subtle racism and it lends itself quite problematically to the supposed multiculturalism of our national discourse.

      • Anarchy Pony

        How so? That there is institutionalized racism in the south? Of course there is, you’d have to be blind not to see it. Does it mean all white people in the south are racist? Of course not, but there is in general a higher incidence of racism there than in most of the rest of the country, that does not mean the rest of the country is immune though.

  • Bwoodriver

    Yes///he could have been found not guilty!

  • Tessa Brock

    That is a lot of prejudice in such a small statement.

  • Anonymous

    Lots of prejudice in the South.

  • Anonymous

    not really. racism in the south is easily verifiable by the meagerest of statistics and the most cursory knowledge of american history.

  • Anonymous

    not really. racism in the south is easily verifiable by the meagerest of statistics and the most cursory knowledge of american history.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Jeez, dont you just love the death penalty? I’m sure there will be people who oppose this execution but support the death penalty because their still under the delusion that maybe one day we can have ‘perfect rulers’ the only ever execute the guitly and the worst offenders. pffft gimme a break.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    Jeez, dont you just love the death penalty? I’m sure there will be people who oppose this execution but support the death penalty because their still under the delusion that maybe one day we can have ‘perfect rulers’ the only ever execute the guitly and the worst offenders. pffft gimme a break.

  • iPINCH

    they used him as an example to any other would be cop killers because of the publicity hes was getting. innocent or not they think it helps to maintain order.

  • iPINCH

    they used him as an example to any other would be cop killers because of the publicity hes was getting. innocent or not they think it helps to maintain order.

  • Tuna Ghost

    I’m not doubting that racism is common in the south, but I’ve found the north to have just as much prejudice and discrimination.  

    http://www.sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/rd_stateratesofincbyraceandethnicity.pdf

    These statistics seem to indicate, unless I’m reading them wrong, that the South does not have a higher incarceration rate for black people.  

  • http://www.ContraControl.com/ Zenc

    I’m sure he’s got family and if they have any kind of stones, they’ll get revenge.

  • http://www.ContraControl.com/ Zenc

    I’m sure he’s got family and if they have any kind of stones, they’ll get revenge.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

      Yeah hopefully they’ll take it out on your sister.

      • http://www.ContraControl.com/ Zenc

        Since she’s laying in the hospital right now recovering from a stage 3 cancer inspired total hysterectomy and probably won’t live anyhow (2nd recurrence) I suppose maybe it’s better her than someone with a full life ahead of them.

        But trust me, I do understand.

        There is a certain allowable amount of collateral damage in the revenge biz.

  • Malk

    maybe it was just a TV line when I used to watch TV as a kid, but I always thought you were “innocent until proven guilty” in America…. I haven’t actually believed that for about 15 years because of the way they kill people left and right in south, but…. how do you kill someone based on word of mouth? you know like semen in the vagina, or finger prints on the neck, gun powder on the palm, etc…. that kind of stuff is called evidence… how do you jail people without evidence? let alone KILL them??

    fucked up America. fucked up.

  • Malk

    maybe it was just a TV line when I used to watch TV as a kid, but I always thought you were “innocent until proven guilty” in America…. I haven’t actually believed that for about 15 years because of the way they kill people left and right in south, but…. how do you kill someone based on word of mouth? you know like semen in the vagina, or finger prints on the neck, gun powder on the palm, etc…. that kind of stuff is called evidence… how do you jail people without evidence? let alone KILL them??

    fucked up America. fucked up.

    • Malkiyahu

      If you’re innocent until proven guilty, then why do they put you in jail before you’re proven guilty? If Americans are innocent until proven guilty, then there are a hell of a lot of innocent people in jail. “Innocent until proven guilty” is just BS propaganda. The reality is you’re guilty until proven innocent.

      • E.B. Wolf

        Innocent until proven guilty only applies to those who can buy that privilege.

    • Devil’s Advocate

      It is a different world than it was in 1990s when he was convicted of murdering a police officer and shooting someone in the face earlier that night.  Before the rise of CSI and the fictionalization of forensic science people had to use the testimony of witnesses in crimes.

      Are you saying if the murder weapon is not found and there is no forensic evidence linking the accused to the crime then the prosecution should ignore witness statements?

      I recommend to everyone read Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets by David Simon.  It gives an accurate and realistic look at homicide investigations.
      https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Homicide:_A_Year_on_the_Killing_Streets

  • emperorreagan

    No doubt that the entire judicial system is slanted against African-Americans, with the popular example of disparate drug sentencing laws being one of the more blatant used to illustrate that point.The death penalty, too, is disproportionately sought in cases where the defendant is black and in particular cases where the defendant is black and the victim(s) are white.  And convictions also, unsurprisingly, show the same racial bias.  And there’s also complicating issues with respect to the competence of legal council for the defense, mental health issues, etc. in many of these cases.The biggest issue with this being in the south is that 80% of all executions conducted since the death penalty was reinstated have occurred in the south.  There seems to be a rush to kill in the south – Texas is only in the middle of the pack in death penalty sentencing rates, but leads the nation in actually carrying out executions.  The governments in the rest of the country seem somewhat more reluctant to put people to death and/or have more laborious legal processes to get to that point.  In the south, though, it seems that you’d need Jesus to appear to the governor and prison boards to demand that an execution be stopped.  And MAYBE they’d listen to Jesus, but he’d also have to tell them that he wasn’t willing to forgive this particular sin.

  • emperorreagan

    No doubt that the entire judicial system is slanted against African-Americans, with the popular example of disparate drug sentencing laws being one of the more blatant used to illustrate that point.The death penalty, too, is disproportionately sought in cases where the defendant is black and in particular cases where the defendant is black and the victim(s) are white.  And convictions also, unsurprisingly, show the same racial bias.  And there’s also complicating issues with respect to the competence of legal council for the defense, mental health issues, etc. in many of these cases.The biggest issue with this being in the south is that 80% of all executions conducted since the death penalty was reinstated have occurred in the south.  There seems to be a rush to kill in the south – Texas is only in the middle of the pack in death penalty sentencing rates, but leads the nation in actually carrying out executions.  The governments in the rest of the country seem somewhat more reluctant to put people to death and/or have more laborious legal processes to get to that point.  In the south, though, it seems that you’d need Jesus to appear to the governor and prison boards to demand that an execution be stopped.  And MAYBE they’d listen to Jesus, but he’d also have to tell them that he wasn’t willing to forgive this particular sin.

  • Anonymous

    you know i’d never claim racism is less severe in northern reaches, i am just referring to the tradition and history of racism in the south which is very overt.

    and while a good measure-incarceration rates are only one statistic, my thoughts in writing the above were statistics about poverty which is also another indicator.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/new-economy/2011/0913/South-bears-the-brunt-of-America-s-rising-poverty-rate

  • Wanooski

    How so? That there is institutionalized racism in the south? Of course there is, you’d have to be blind not to see it. Does it mean all white people in the south are racist? Of course not, but there is in general a higher incidence of racism there than in most of the rest of the country, that does not mean the rest of the country is immune though.

  • Malkiyahu

    If you’re innocent until proven guilty, then why do they put you in jail before you’re proven guilty? If Americans are innocent until proven guilty, then there are a hell of a lot of innocent people in jail. “Innocent until proven guilty” is just BS propaganda. The reality is you’re guilty until proven innocent.

  • Anonymous

    All I know is that he is in a better, much more just, place–and I’m an atheist. 

  • StillAtMyMoms

    All I know is that he is in a better, much more just, place–and I’m an atheist. 

  • Devil’s Advocate

    It is a different world than it was in 1990s when he was convicted of murdering a police officer and shooting someone in the face earlier that night.  Before the rise of CSI and the fictionalization of forensic science people had to use the testimony of witnesses in crimes.

    Are you saying if the murder weapon is not found and there is no forensic evidence linking the accused to the crime then the prosecution should ignore witness statements?

    I recommend to everyone read Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets by David Simon.  It gives an accurate and realistic look at homicide investigations.
    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Homicide:_A_Year_on_the_Killing_Streets

  • Devil’s Advcate

    The same day Lawrence Russell Brewer was executed on Texas’ death row.  He was accused of dragging James Byrd, Jr along 2 miles of road with 2 other accomplices in which Mr. Byrd was decapitated and died.  Brewer was convicted of the crime and sentenced to execution.

    I don’t see anyone protesting the execution of Brewer.

    An interesting note.  Taking the statistics of prisoners on death row in the state of Texas ( found http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/stat/racial.htm ) and running the numbers in a Chi-square test to test for significance between the groups of races shows that there is no significant difference between the number of blacks, hispanic, and whites that are on Death Row in Texas.

    There is a significant difference between the number of men and women sentenced to execution in Texas.  Does that mean there is a feminist and sexist agenda that sentences men to execution more likely than women?  No, using statistics as causation is a slippery slope.

  • Devil’s Advcate

    The same day Lawrence Russell Brewer was executed on Texas’ death row.  He was accused of dragging James Byrd, Jr along 2 miles of road with 2 other accomplices in which Mr. Byrd was decapitated and died.  Brewer was convicted of the crime and sentenced to execution.

    I don’t see anyone protesting the execution of Brewer.

    An interesting note.  Taking the statistics of prisoners on death row in the state of Texas ( found http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/stat/racial.htm ) and running the numbers in a Chi-square test to test for significance between the groups of races shows that there is no significant difference between the number of blacks, hispanic, and whites that are on Death Row in Texas.

    There is a significant difference between the number of men and women sentenced to execution in Texas.  Does that mean there is a feminist and sexist agenda that sentences men to execution more likely than women?  No, using statistics as causation is a slippery slope.

  • Tuna Ghost

    The biggest issue with this being in the south is that 80%+ of all executions conducted since the death penalty was reinstated have occurred in the south.  There seems to be a rush to kill in the south – Texas is only in the middle of the pack in death penalty sentencing rates, but leads the nation in actually carrying out executions.  

    I’m wondering how much Texas skews the stats.  I could research it, but I’m pretty damn lazy.

  • Tuna Ghost

    you know i’d never claim racism is less severe in northern reaches, i am just referring to the tradition and history of racism in the south which is very overt.

    On the plus side, the race discussion is very front-and-center (as is the racism), rather than subdued as in the north.

    and while a good measure-incarceration rates are only one statistic, my thoughts in writing the above were statistics about poverty which is also another indicator.

    Hmm touche sir

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Congratulations GA…I’m sure a dead guy is much easier to bury than a meaningful examination of the flaws in the system that made it impossible to accept a change of verdict after the fact.

    The real cruelty here is that despite overwhelming evidence that the initial case was botched and that the verdict was rendered with inaccurate facts that were later contradicted…the state technically had every right to kill Troy Davis…and proved it legally time and again…almost solely because the ‘bar’ for overturning his verdict was set so insanely high that even recanted witnesses, allegations of witness intimidation and false testimony…and even an alleged confession by another person…were still not enough to meet the states criteria for reversing a standing verdict.

    So never mind the inherent flaws in happily killing off someone as a punishment with no fallback position for little accidents like innocence…the real flaw is the ENTIRETY of the GA legal system and its fully insane criteria for rectifying errors…and its fairly obvious that GA and no small number of fed appointees murdered Troy Davis to avoid a painful discussion about their serious issues.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Congratulations GA…I’m sure a dead guy is much easier to bury than a meaningful examination of the flaws in the system that made it impossible to accept a change of verdict after the fact.

    The real cruelty here is that despite overwhelming evidence that the initial case was botched and that the verdict was rendered with inaccurate facts that were later contradicted…the state technically had every right to kill Troy Davis…and proved it legally time and again…almost solely because the ‘bar’ for overturning his verdict was set so insanely high that even recanted witnesses, allegations of witness intimidation and false testimony…and even an alleged confession by another person…were still not enough to meet the states criteria for reversing a standing verdict.

    So never mind the inherent flaws in happily killing off someone as a punishment with no fallback position for little accidents like innocence…the real flaw is the ENTIRETY of the GA legal system and its fully insane criteria for rectifying errors…and its fairly obvious that GA and no small number of fed appointees murdered Troy Davis to avoid a painful discussion about their serious issues.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

      Uh, dumbass, there were like thirty witnesses and most of them were black.  The jury that sent the asshat to death row was majority black.  This guy should have died over twenty years ago.  The real crime is that the police officer’s family had to wait decades to get justice,

  • emperorreagan

    Since it’s still in my browsing history when I looked it up yesterday to verify my information before posting:

    There have been 1,269 executions since the death penalty was reinstated.  475 have been in Texas.

    So the skew isn’t quite as enormous when you exclude Texas.  However, Virginia has executed 109, which is in the ballpark of the next closest region (the midwest at 149).

    Here’s the total breakdown by region:
    South – 1042
    Midwest – 149
    West – 74
    Northeast – 4

    If you exclude Texas and Virginia’s combined 584 executions from everything, the south still accounts for 458 executions (still over 60% of the remaining executions).

  • emperorreagan

    Also interesting – Virginia is #1 since 1608, with ~1385.
    Texas is #2, with ~1,221.
    New York is #3, with ~1,130 (0 in the modern era).
    Pennsylvania is #4, with ~1,043 (3 in the modern era).
    Georgia is #5, with ~999.

    Numbers were through March of this year, so they have obviously gone up in the case of Texas, Virginia, and Georgia.  I don’t recall hearing about any in PA.  Texas is clearly trying to overtake #1, and that’s with the eastern states having a head state – the data for TX starts in 1819, while Virginia goes back to 1608.

  • Anonymous

    I agree that there is a ‘benefit’ to having racism overt, rather than subtle. I live in the land of passive aggressive and subtle racism and it lends itself quite problematically to the supposed multiculturalism of our national discourse.

  • E.B. Wolf

    Innocent until proven guilty only applies to those who can buy that privilege.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

    Uh, dumbass, there were like thirty witnesses and most of them were black.  The jury that sent the asshat to death row was majority black.  This guy should have died over twenty years ago.  The real crime is that the police officer’s family had to wait decades to get justice,

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

    Uh, dumbass, there were like thirty witnesses and most of them were black.  The jury that sent the asshat to death row was majority black.  This guy should have died over twenty years ago.  The real crime is that the police officer’s family had to wait decades to get justice,

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

    Yeah hopefully they’ll take it out on your sister.

  • http://www.ContraControl.com/ Zenc

    Since she’s laying in the hospital right now recovering from a stage 3 cancer inspired total hysterectomy and probably won’t live anyhow (2nd recurrence) I suppose maybe it’s better her than someone with a full life ahead of them.

    But trust me, I do understand.

    There is a certain allowable amount of collateral damage in the revenge biz.