Muammar Gaddafi Is Dead

GaddafiReuters reports that Libya’s longstanding leader has been killed in the NATO-sponsored revolution:

Former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi died of wounds suffered on Thursday as fighters battling to complete an eight-month-old uprising against his rule overran his hometown Sirte, Libya’s interim rulers said.

His killing, which came swiftly after his capture near Sirte, is the most dramatic single development in the Arab Spring revolts that have unseated rulers in Egypt and Tunisia and threatened the grip on power of the leaders of Syria and Yemen.

“He (Gaddafi) was also hit in his head,” National Transitional Council official Abdel Majid Mlegta told Reuters. “There was a lot of firing against his group and he died.”

Mlegta told Reuters earlier that Gaddafi, who was in his late 60s, was captured and wounded in both legs at dawn on Thursday as he tried to flee in a convoy which NATO warplanes attacked. He said he had been taken away by an ambulance.

There was no independent confirmation of his remarks.

An anti-Gaddafi fighter said Gaddafi had been found hiding in a hole in the ground and had said “Don’t shoot, don’t shoot” to the men who grabbed him…

[continues at Reuters]

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  • S Sweetland

    Why am I so disbelieving?

    • Myc Docomo

      “An anti-Gaddafi fighter said Gaddafi had been found hiding in a hole in
      the ground and had said “Don’t shoot, don’t shoot” to the men who
      grabbed him… ”

      This quote from above doesn’t feature in the Reuters article. Is majestic deliberately Saddamizing this story to remind us to be wary of disinformation being spread, even here on.. Disinfo?

      • http://disinfo.com/ Majestic

        Nope, that’s what was on Reuters when I cut and pasted the block quote. As is quite common with breaking news stories, Reuters later edited the story.

    • V.

      he is just being satirical because its usually how history goes. But people here from what i seen are some of the most hopeful and realistic around

  • S Sweetland

    Why am I so disbelieving?

  • Heath

    phase one complete…phase two install puppet regime exploit Libya’s oil industry.. Phase three expose the new puppet regime as a terrorist threat, phase four  “Lets have a war!”

    • Calypso_1

      addendum
      Phase 2.1  Sell massive amount of arms to puppet regime.  Paid for by their oil ‘profits’. 
                2.2  Have puppet regime invade nearby country we don’t like – say Sudan. 
                2.3  Spin as humanitarian R2P for Darfur. 

    • Nunzio X

      Phase Five:

      Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

  • Heath

    phase one complete…phase two install puppet regime exploit Libya’s oil industry.. Phase three expose the new puppet regime as a terrorist threat, phase four  “Lets have a war!”

  • sinclair_babbitt

    I am fearful for Libya’s future… A civil war tears a country apart. And do you have any idea how much money NATO-countries have poured into this war? Even with no boots on the ground, they will claim their share. The Democracy Now! news hour has offered some varied voices on the Libya situation, in particular talking to several guests who were critical of the role NATO has played. They also have a correspondent in Libya who has reported from the front lines – talking to many rebels themselves. Probably worth checking out some of their reports:

    http://www.democracynow.org/tags/libya

    • Xenobia_mia

      I have faith in the NTC..

  • Anonymous

    I am fearful for Libya’s future… A civil war tears a country apart. And do you have any idea how much money NATO-countries have poured into this war? Even with no boots on the ground, they will claim their share.  Democracy Now! has offered some varied voices on the Libya situation, in particular talking to several guests who were critical of the role NATO has played. They also have a correspondent in Libya who has reported from the front lines – talking to many rebels themselves. Probably worth checking out some of their reports:

    http://www.democracynow.org/tags/libya

  • Anonymous

    I am fearful for Libya’s future… A civil war tears a country apart. And do you have any idea how much money NATO-countries have poured into this war? Even with no boots on the ground, they will claim their share. The Democracy Now! news hour has offered some varied voices on the Libya situation, in particular talking to several guests who were critical of the role NATO has played. They also have a correspondent in Libya who has reported from the front lines – talking to many rebels themselves. Probably worth checking out some of their reports:

    http://www.democracynow.org/tags/libya

  • Myc Docomo

    “An anti-Gaddafi fighter said Gaddafi had been found hiding in a hole in
    the ground and had said “Don’t shoot, don’t shoot” to the men who
    grabbed him… ”

    This quote from above doesn’t feature in the Reuters article. Is majestic deliberately Saddamizing this story to remind us to be wary of disinformation being spread, even here on.. Disinfo?

  • V.

    he is just being satirical because its usually how history goes. But people here from what i seen are some of the most hopeful and realistic around

  • Moi

    Awww. I’ll miss his wardrobe. Why couldn’t he just surrender and become a fashion designer instead? he’d be maah-vellous daahlings…

  • Moi

    Awww. I’ll miss his wardrobe. Why couldn’t he just surrender and become a fashion designer instead? he’d be maah-vellous daahlings…

  • Kev

    good night sweet prince

  • Kev

    good night sweet prince

  • Fred Stjohnsengen

    Of course. Have they already buried him at sea?

  • Fred Stjohnsengen

    Of course. Have they already buried him at sea?

    • Xenobia_mia

      Proper Islamic burial most probably.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-Robinson/100000587056213 Patrick Robinson

    Regardless of what Muammar Gadaffi did to his people, he should never have been murdered. There was no need – it would be ridiculous to describe a 69 year old man as being any sort of threat. He was carrying a pistol, but he still begged his captor not to shoot him. We can clearly see that he was shown no quarter in the interim. He deserved trial, just like Osama did. For as long as we continue to seek vengeance through bloodshed we will never rise up from this ugly quagmire

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-Robinson/100000587056213 Patrick Robinson

    Regardless of what Muammar Gadaffi did to his people, he should never have been murdered. There was no need – it would be ridiculous to describe a 69 year old man as being any sort of threat. He was carrying a pistol, but he still begged his captor not to shoot him. We can clearly see that he was shown no quarter in the interim. He deserved trial, just like Osama did. For as long as we continue to seek vengeance through bloodshed we will never rise up from this ugly quagmire

    • Reasor

      I can’t find fault with your reasoning.  On the other hand, fuck that bastard. 

    • Adam

      I doubt Gaddafi was assassinated by U.S. Special Forces or some other Euro-American covert ops team as was (supposedly) the case with Bin Laden; he was very probably immediately executed by whatever group of Libyan rebels found him after the firefight.  As reviled as he was by the majority of the population (the non-Gaddafi loyalists), there is no way that Gaddafi would have ever seen a trial if he was found by any of his own people; just think of what would have happened to Saddam Hussein if Muqtada Al Sadr’s Mahdi Army would have located Saddam before the U.S. military did.  What went down here was good ol’ fashioned populist vengeance.
      By the way, I’m not really arguing against your moral point, I think it’s a good one, I’m just saying this death was not the West, this was likely just the Libyans.

      “Hey look, isn’t that the asshole dictator who has brutally oppressed us and exploited our country for decades? Maybe we should hold him for trial at the Hague so America and the U.N. can tell us what to do…Actually, you know what, fuck that, let’s just shoot him in the head.”

  • Calypso

    addendum
    Phase 2.1  Sell massive amount of arms to puppet regime.  Paid for by their oil ‘profits’. 
              2.2  Have puppet regime invade nearby country we don’t like – say Sudan. 
              2.3  Spin as humanitarian R2P for Darfur. 

  • Nunzio X

    Phase Five:

    Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

  • Anonymous

    I can’t find fault with your reasoning.  On the other hand, fuck that bastard. 

  • Dbrasan
  • Dbrasan
  • http://disinfo.com Majestic

    Nope, that’s what was on Reuters when I cut and pasted the block quote. As is quite common with breaking news stories, Reuters later edited the story.

  • V.
  • V.
  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.aviles Joe Aviles

    big win for the world bank and imf . . . i bet who ever comes next will magically need loans for infrastructure projects. next up 3rd world debt inspires global resource grab.

  • Adam

    I doubt Gaddafi was assassinated by U.S. Special Forces or some other Euro-American covert ops team as was (supposedly) the case with Bin Laden; he was very probably immediately executed by whatever group of Libyan rebels found him after the firefight.  As reviled as he was by the majority of the population (the non-Gaddafi loyalists), there is no way that Gaddafi would have ever seen a trial if he was found by any of his own people; just think of what would have happened to Saddam Hussein if Muqtada Al Sadr’s Mahdi Army would have located Saddam before the U.S. military did.  What went down here was good ol’ fashioned populist vengeance.
    By the way, I’m not really arguing against your moral point, I think it’s a good one, I’m just saying this death was not the West, this was likely just the Libyans.

    “Hey look, isn’t that the asshole dictator who has brutally oppressed us and exploited our country for decades? Maybe we should hold him for trial at the Hague so America and the U.N. can tell us what to do…Actually, you know what, fuck that, let’s just shoot him in the head.”

  • Jarel

    Gaddafi demanded Libyan oil be paid for in gold instead of US dollars. That is why he is dead now.

  • Jarel

    Gaddafi demanded Libyan oil be paid for in gold instead of US dollars. That is why he is dead now.

  • Xenobia_mia

    Proper Islamic burial most probably.

  • Xenobia_mia

    I have faith in the NTC..

  • Panic Lazar

    Former MI5 agent Annie Machon says that the US wants to reinforce the
    myths that public has been told about NATO’s ‘humanitarian’
    intervention, while Libya is being bombed beyond the point of no return.

    During
    her visit to Libya, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has used
    unusually blunt terms to describe what the United States wants to see
    happen in Libya, namely former dictator Muammar Gaddafi being killed or
    captured.

    Machon says even though Gaddafi was an odious dictator
    and a thorn in the side of Western countries for three decades, for the
    majority of Libyans their quality of life was perfectly fine.

    “They’ve
    had free education, free health, they could study abroad. When they got
    married they got a certain amount of money. So they were rather the
    envy of many other citizens of African countries. Now, of course, since
    NATO’s humanitarian intervention the infrastructure of their country has
    been bombed back to the Stone Age. They will not have the same quality
    of life. Women probably will not have the same degree of emancipation
    under any new transitional government. The national wealth is probably
    going to be siphoned off by Western corporations. Perhaps the standard
    of living in Libya might have been slightly higher than it perhaps is
    now in America and the UK with the recession,” she said.

    • Raz

      Let’s see ten years from now  how many americans will support this initiative against Lybia.

  • Panic Lazar

    Former MI5 agent Annie Machon says that the US wants to reinforce the
    myths that public has been told about NATO’s ‘humanitarian’
    intervention, while Libya is being bombed beyond the point of no return.

    During
    her visit to Libya, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has used
    unusually blunt terms to describe what the United States wants to see
    happen in Libya, namely former dictator Muammar Gaddafi being killed or
    captured.

    Machon says even though Gaddafi was an odious dictator
    and a thorn in the side of Western countries for three decades, for the
    majority of Libyans their quality of life was perfectly fine.

    “They’ve
    had free education, free health, they could study abroad. When they got
    married they got a certain amount of money. So they were rather the
    envy of many other citizens of African countries. Now, of course, since
    NATO’s humanitarian intervention the infrastructure of their country has
    been bombed back to the Stone Age. They will not have the same quality
    of life. Women probably will not have the same degree of emancipation
    under any new transitional government. The national wealth is probably
    going to be siphoned off by Western corporations. Perhaps the standard
    of living in Libya might have been slightly higher than it perhaps is
    now in America and the UK with the recession,” she said.

  • Raz

    Let’s see ten years from now  how many americans will support this initiative against Lybia.

  • Inpt19

    The world wanted an end to
    Gaddafi’s  rule. Now what? Gaddafi has
    finally fallen on his own sword. Is the Arab world pleased?

    One battle is over. Gaddafi is
    gone. But the multiple battles are going to start.  Conflicts between NATO’s men and the fighters
    and their supporters on the ground, and conflicts between the foreign forces
    that have spent billions in the war on Gaddafi:

    The vacuum created by Gaddafi’s
    departure is now filled by a sharp polarisation between the rival Libyan camps
    between pro-Gaddafi and anti Gaddafi Libyans

    It is a contest between an
    independent Libyan economic nationalism and one dominated as we see in all Arab
    lands by the West. Will the west allow this?

    These conflicts are part of the
    wider scene in the region, which is characterised by polarisation between the
    internal dynamics of the revolution and the foreign powers’ logic of
    containment and calculated economic control and political domination as we see
    in KSA

    These foreign powers’ strategy
    is to change  the old players with new
    ones. The neo-colonisation game rules  are
    intact. The West will as usual initiate  proxy wars manned via allied local elites,
    thus packing the same wine in a new bottle as they have been doing in Tunisia and Egypt.

    In the end the people of Libya are the losers.  The masses should never support a regime
    change that is backed by Western powers as it does not create the necessary
    change from the point of independent economic nationalism.

     

  • Inpt19

    The world wanted an end to
    Gaddafi’s  rule. Now what? Gaddafi has
    finally fallen on his own sword. Is the Arab world pleased?

    One battle is over. Gaddafi is
    gone. But the multiple battles are going to start.  Conflicts between NATO’s men and the fighters
    and their supporters on the ground, and conflicts between the foreign forces
    that have spent billions in the war on Gaddafi:

    The vacuum created by Gaddafi’s
    departure is now filled by a sharp polarisation between the rival Libyan camps
    between pro-Gaddafi and anti Gaddafi Libyans

    It is a contest between an
    independent Libyan economic nationalism and one dominated as we see in all Arab
    lands by the West. Will the west allow this?

    These conflicts are part of the
    wider scene in the region, which is characterised by polarisation between the
    internal dynamics of the revolution and the foreign powers’ logic of
    containment and calculated economic control and political domination as we see
    in KSA

    These foreign powers’ strategy
    is to change  the old players with new
    ones. The neo-colonisation game rules  are
    intact. The West will as usual initiate  proxy wars manned via allied local elites,
    thus packing the same wine in a new bottle as they have been doing in Tunisia and Egypt.

    In the end the people of Libya are the losers.  The masses should never support a regime
    change that is backed by Western powers as it does not create the necessary
    change from the point of independent economic nationalism.

     

  • mohamedpameen

    The world wanted an end to
    Gaddafi’s  rule. Now what? Gaddafi has
    finally fallen on his own sword. Is the Arab world pleased?

    One battle is over. Gaddafi is
    gone. But the multiple battles are going to start.  Conflicts between NATO’s men and the fighters
    and their supporters on the ground, and conflicts between the foreign forces
    that have spent billions in the war on Gaddafi:

    The vacuum created by Gaddafi’s
    departure is now filled by a sharp polarisation between the rival Libyan camps
    between pro-Gaddafi and anti Gaddafi Libyans

    It is a contest between an
    independent Libyan economic nationalism and one dominated as we see in all Arab
    lands by the West. Will the west allow this?

    These conflicts are part of the
    wider scene in the region, which is characterised by polarisation between the
    internal dynamics of the revolution and the foreign powers’ logic of
    containment and calculated economic control and political domination as we see
    in KSA

    These foreign powers’ strategy
    is to change  the old players with new
    ones. The neo-colonisation game rules  are
    intact. The West will as usual initiate  proxy wars manned via allied local elites,
    thus packing the same wine in a new bottle as they have been doing in Tunisia and Egypt.

    In the end the people of Libya are the losers.  The masses should never support a regime
    change that is backed by Western powers as it does not create the necessary
    change from the point of independent economic nationalism.

     

  • mohamedpameen

    The world wanted an end to
    Gaddafi’s  rule. Now what? Gaddafi has
    finally fallen on his own sword. Is the Arab world pleased?

    One battle is over. Gaddafi is
    gone. But the multiple battles are going to start.  Conflicts between NATO’s men and the fighters
    and their supporters on the ground, and conflicts between the foreign forces
    that have spent billions in the war on Gaddafi:

    The vacuum created by Gaddafi’s
    departure is now filled by a sharp polarisation between the rival Libyan camps
    between pro-Gaddafi and anti Gaddafi Libyans

    It is a contest between an
    independent Libyan economic nationalism and one dominated as we see in all Arab
    lands by the West. Will the west allow this?

    These conflicts are part of the
    wider scene in the region, which is characterised by polarisation between the
    internal dynamics of the revolution and the foreign powers’ logic of
    containment and calculated economic control and political domination as we see
    in KSA

    These foreign powers’ strategy
    is to change  the old players with new
    ones. The neo-colonisation game rules  are
    intact. The West will as usual initiate  proxy wars manned via allied local elites,
    thus packing the same wine in a new bottle as they have been doing in Tunisia and Egypt.

    In the end the people of Libya are the losers.  The masses should never support a regime
    change that is backed by Western powers as it does not create the necessary
    change from the point of independent economic nationalism.

     

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