Newspapers To Disappear By 2040?

ALeqM5iAPPYRjlbQRCvzYsPh4kFxa2Ro4wTaking, for example, the New York Times’ inability or unwillingness to properly cover the Occupy Wall Street protests, maybe this news isn’t all that bad. AFP reports:

Newspapers will disappear and be replaced by digital versions by 2040, the UN intellectual property agency’s chief said in an interview published on Monday.

Francis Gurry, who heads the World Intellectual Property Organisation told the daily La Tribune de Geneve that “in a few years, there will no longer be printed newspapers as we know it today.”

“It’s an evolution. There’s no good or bad about it. There are studies showing that they will disappear by 2040. In the United States, it will end in 2017,” he said.

Gurry noted that in the United States there are already more digital copies sold than paper copies of newspapers. In cities, there are also fewer bookshops.

A key problem is the revenue system.

“How can editors find revenues to pay those who write these articles?” asked Gurry, noting that “the copyright system must be safeguarded as a mechanism to pay these writers.”

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  • Mr Willow

    Makes sense for newspapers—printing twenty or forty pages worth of analyses, reports, and observations that will (for the most part) be entirely useless the following day. It’s wasteful in terms of production of paper, setting of type, etc. etc. 

    But, call me anachronistic if you must, I will always prefer books to a tablet or e-reader. There is something more pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper, the binding that simply is not attainable when holding a piece of plastic. Certainly there is merit in the argument of space—being able to carry ten thousand books with you everywhere is intriguing, and for many it will probably be desirable especially for people who simply don’t have the physical limitations for a library—but I think that speaks more to people’s dismally short attention spans and our fickle culture. Bored with one thing? Put it down and pick up something else. 

    Plus, if you have the right book, you can read it until it turns to dust and want to read it again. 

  • Mr Willow

    Makes sense for newspapers—printing twenty or forty pages worth of analyses, reports, and observations that will (for the most part) be entirely useless the following day. It’s wasteful in terms of production of paper, setting of type, etc. etc. 

    But, call me anachronistic if you must, I will always prefer books to a tablet or e-reader. There is something more pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper, the binding that simply is not attainable when holding a piece of plastic. Certainly there is merit in the argument of space—being able to carry ten thousand books with you everywhere is intriguing, and for many it will probably be desirable especially for people who simply don’t have the physical limitations for a library—but I think that speaks more to people’s dismally short attention spans and our fickle culture. Bored with one thing? Put it down and pick up something else. 

    Plus, if you have the right book, you can read it until it turns to dust and want to read it again. 

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    This is going to save heaps of trees. Can you imagine all the forests that are destroyed for all of our books, newspapers, and physical documents. All because some people think there is something “pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper” doesnt mean we should keep going down the road of unsustainable environmental practices. Especially when we have the technology to transcend such practices.

    • Mr Willow

      All because some people think there is something “pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper”

      I was only talking about books. I acknowledge it as a natural progression for newspapers and magazines. 

      And paper can be made of other materials, and it can be recycled.

      • Monkey See Monkey Do

        I guess its wise to store all the most important information in some sort of hard copy as a back up. Give that its possible to lose all computer data in any number of scenarios ie: Magnetic Pole Shift. Wouldn’t want another loss of information like the burning of the Alexandria library.
                      
         “And paper can be made of other materials, and it can be recycled.” – I know, we should be using hemp for our paper and we could use it for clothing and industrial material etc etc. Its just crazy that our civilization doesn’t use it.

        • Gergith

          As hard as it is to believe, the pulp paper industry is one of the best recyclers, and in fact one of the only products that gets recycled that actually makes sense. The energy required to recycle the paper is less then getting new paper, which ISN’T the case with plastics. It’s the main reason we do recycle.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    This is going to save heaps of trees. Can you imagine all the forests that are destroyed for all of our books, newspapers, and physical documents. All because some people think there is something “pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper” doesnt mean we should keep going down the road of unsustainable environmental practices. Especially when we have the technology to transcend such practices.

  • Mr Willow

    All because some people think there is something “pleasing about the smell, the weight, the tactility of the paper”

    I was only talking about books. I acknowledge it as a natural progression for newspapers and magazines. 

    And paper can be made of other materials, and it can be recycled.

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    I guess its wise to store all the most important information in some sort of hard copy as a back up. Give that its possible to lose all computer data in any number of scenarios ie: Magnetic Pole Shift. Wouldn’t want another loss of information like the burning of the Alexandria library.
                  
     “And paper can be made of other materials, and it can be recycled.” – I know, we should be using hemp for our paper and we could use it for clothing and industrial material etc etc. Its just crazy that our civilization doesn’t use it.

  • Gergith

    As hard as it is to believe, the pulp paper industry is one of the best recyclers, and in fact one of the only products that gets recycled that actually makes sense. The energy required to recycle the paper is less then getting new paper, which ISN’T the case with plastics. It’s the main reason we do recycle.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/CIWELQC2XYYHKBG3IVT3F25DBQ Tomas M

    We’re setting ourselves up for big trouble.  Pretty soon nobody’s going to “shop”.  Everything’s going to be done on the internet.  We’re going to rely too much on technology. 

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/CIWELQC2XYYHKBG3IVT3F25DBQ Tomas M

    We’re setting ourselves up for big trouble.  Pretty soon nobody’s going to “shop”.  Everything’s going to be done on the internet.  We’re going to rely too much on technology. 

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