The (Unexplained) Death of Bats

BatVia New Times:

The abandoned iron mine at Mine Hill in Roxbury used to provide a winter home for 3,000 bats — the largest bat hibernaculum in the state. The last time Jennie Dickson, a wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, counted, there were about 100 bats there.

“That’s not good,” she said. For the past five years, the bats of the eastern United States have been dying in like numbers — one of the worst environmental catastrophes in recent years.

What biologists like Dickson knew was that the dying bats could be found with an off-white fungus on their nose and wings. What was causing the die-off was uncertain …

More: New Times

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6 Responses to The (Unexplained) Death of Bats

  1. Anti-Citizen1 November 1, 2011 at 5:01 am #

    What do you mean unexplained? It’s white nose syndrome, which is caused by a european fungus that american bats are unable to defend against. Thanks again international trade.

  2. Anarchy Pony November 1, 2011 at 1:01 am #

    What do you mean unexplained? It’s white nose syndrome, which is caused by a european fungus that american bats are unable to defend against. Thanks again international trade.

  3. Gort November 1, 2011 at 2:28 pm #

    Additional consideration may be given to the release of genetically modified mosquitoes in 2009.

    Humans are clearly known to work in the laboratory with recklessness and disregard.

  4. Gort November 1, 2011 at 10:28 am #

    Additional consideration may be given to the release of genetically modified mosquitoes in 2009.

    Humans are clearly known to work in the laboratory with recklessness and disregard.

  5. justagirl November 1, 2011 at 7:18 pm #

    the sad thing about bats is they are missing their tails.  they used to be so cuuute.  sigh.

  6. justagirl November 1, 2011 at 3:18 pm #

    the sad thing about bats is they are missing their tails.  they used to be so cuuute.  sigh.

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