Dau: The Biggest, Most Insane Movie In Cinema History

movie-set-ate-itself-628From GQ, Michael Idov visits the cult-like set of the Ukrainian film Dau — an enclosed bubble where thousands of actors have been living the lives of their characters 24 hours a day, ever since production began in 2006, using Soviet passports and money, in a world that is exactly as things were in the 1950s, while their real lives recede into the past:

Five years ago, a relatively unknown (and unhinged) director began one of the wildest experiments in film history. Armed with total creative control, he invaded a Ukrainian city, marshaled a cast of thousands and thousands, and constructed a totalitarian society in which the cameras are always rolling and the actors never go home.

The rumors started seeping out of Ukraine about three years ago: A young Russian film director has holed up on the outskirts of Kharkov, a town of 1.4 million in the country’s east, making…something. A movie, sure, but not just that. If the gossip was to be believed, this was the most expansive, complicated, all-consuming film project ever attempted.

A steady stream of former extras and fired PAs talked of the shoot in terms usually reserved for survivalist camps. The director, Ilya Khrzhanovsky, was a madman who forced the crew to dress in Stalin-era clothes, fed them Soviet food out of cans and tins, and paid them in Soviet money. Others said the project was a cult and everyone involved worked for free. Khrzhanovsky had taken over all of Kharkov, they said, shutting down the airport. No, no, others insisted, the entire thing was a prison experiment, perhaps filmed surreptitiously by hidden cameras.

I’m about to write the rumors off as idle blog chatter when I get to the film’s compound itself and, again, find myself ready to believe anything. The set, seen from the outside, is an enormous wooden box jutting directly out of a three-story brick building that houses the film’s vast offices, workshops, and prop warehouses. The wardrobe department alone takes up the entire basement. Here, a pair of twins order me out of my clothes and into a 1950s three-piece suit complete with sock garters, pants that go up to the navel, a fedora, two bricklike brown shoes, an undershirt, and boxers. Black, itchy, and unspeakably ugly, the underwear is enough to trigger Proustian recall of the worst kind in anyone who’s spent any time in the USSR. (I lived in Latvia through high school.)

The twins, Olya and Lena, see nothing unusual about this hazing ritual for a reporter who’s not going to appear in a single shot of the film—just like they see nothing unusual in the fact that the cameras haven’t rolled for more than a month. After all, the film, tentatively titled Dau, has been in production since 2006 and won’t wrap until 2012, if ever. But within the walls of the set, for the 300 people working on the project—including the fifty or so who live in costume, in character—there is no difference between “on” and “off.”

One of the twins admiringly touches my head. Before coming to wardrobe, I’d stopped in hair and makeup. My nape and temples are now shaved clean in an approximation of an old hairstyle called a half-box. All to help me blend in on the set. Only, from here on, I can no longer call it that. According to a glossary of forbidden terms posted right in front of me on the wall, the set is to be referred to as the Institute. Likewise, inside the Institute, there are no scenes, just experiments. No shooting, only documentation. And there is certainly no director. Instead, Ilya Khrzhanovsky, the man responsible for this madness, is to be referred to as the Head of the Institute or simply the Boss.

Read the rest at GQ.com

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  • Anti-Citizen1

    That sounds like a movie in and of itself… Is this some sort of meta marketing? I haz a confuzed.

  • Anarchy Pony

    That sounds like a movie in and of itself… Is this some sort of meta marketing? I haz a confuzed.

  • Sj

    How about some atcual marketing  here

  • msg23

    Been done already, Synecdoche, New York (2008): imdb link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0383028/

  • msg23

    Been done already, Synecdoche, New York (2008): imdb link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0383028/

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=533094502 Max Schneider

    I really want to visit the set. Sure, I’ll quit my job and go live in a mock-totalitarian society for a few years.

    Honestly, as a filmmaker, what the director is doing is making up for his lack of ability to direct actors in a social environment that no longer exists. Directing is being able to invoke emotion in your actors, but instead he has just re-invented that environment so that the emotion will come naturally. Also, I didn’t read any mention of script, so I hve no idea how there will be a coherent plot. I mean, there are microphones on every lamp post. If you want to film that kind of realism, just hack the feed to London’s CCTV network.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=533094502 Max Schneider

    I really want to visit the set. Sure, I’ll quit my job and go live in a mock-totalitarian society for a few years.

    Honestly, as a filmmaker, what the director is doing is making up for his lack of ability to direct actors in a social environment that no longer exists. Directing is being able to invoke emotion in your actors, but instead he has just re-invented that environment so that the emotion will come naturally. Also, I didn’t read any mention of script, so I hve no idea how there will be a coherent plot. I mean, there are microphones on every lamp post. If you want to film that kind of realism, just hack the feed to London’s CCTV network.

  • Matthewhubele

    haha.

  • Matthewhubele

    haha.

  • Redacted

    I’ll watch it if it makes it to the US, but I’m very excited about Iron Sky.

  • Anonymous

    I’ll watch it if it makes it to the US, but I’m very excited about Iron Sky.

  • Glasshouse

    Fascinating! Made even more interesting by the fact that I just started reading Glasshouse by Charles Stross…

  • Glasshouse

    Fascinating! Made even more interesting by the fact that I just started reading Glasshouse by Charles Stross…

  • Curtis7676

    I immediately thought of  “Synecdoche” as well, so it was easy to picture the process, however this is a bit different in that it is set in 1952 Russia, all of the outside world is kept separate, and he does have a goal of completing the film.  Where Kaufman only wrote about this: this guy is living it.

  • Curtis7676

    I immediately thought of  “Synecdoche” as well, so it was easy to picture the process, however this is a bit different in that it is set in 1952 Russia, all of the outside world is kept separate, and he does have a goal of completing the film.  Where Kaufman only wrote about this: this guy is living it.

  • Lute

    This is insane!

  • Lute

    This is insane!

  • Lute

    This is insane!