When Pollution Grows Terrible, The Elite Breathe Purified Air

gty_beijing_pollution_nt_111101_wblogIt has recently been noted that in the Chinese capital of Beijing, the air quality has grown so bad as to be off the charts of measurability. But the New York Times reports that the elite breathe special air thanks to purification systems — is this the global future, in which a breath of fresh air is a luxury item?

Ordinary Beijingers could take some comfort in the knowledge that the soupy air they breathe on especially polluted days also finds its way into the lungs of the privileged and pampered. Such assumptions, it seems, are not entirely accurate.

As it turns out, the homes and offices of many top leaders are filtered by high-end devices, at least according to a Chinese company, the Broad Group, which has been promoting its air-purifying machines in advertisements that highlight their ubiquity in places where many officials work and live.

The company’s vice president, Zhang Zhong, said there were more than 200 purifiers scattered throughout Great Hall of the People, the office of China’s president, Hu Jintao, and Zhongnanhai, the walled compound for senior leaders and their families. “Creating clean, healthy air for our national leaders is a blessing to the people,” boasts the company’s promotional material.

News that Chinese leaders are largely insulated from Beijing’s famously foul air comes at a time of unusually heavy pollution in the capital. In recent weeks, the capital has been continuously shrouded by a beige pall and readings from the United States Embassy’s rooftop air monitoring device have repeatedly registered unsafe levels of particulate matter.

36 Comments on "When Pollution Grows Terrible, The Elite Breathe Purified Air"

  1. nathan willard | Nov 7, 2011 at 10:19 pm |

    And we were worried they would exceed our success, how could they ever get real far when the driving force their work force is being continuously poisoned, and stupefied by toxic air and food, a system like that can not sustain itself for very long, the poor living conditions will bring plagues of issues upon the people as well as lead the masses to either revolt or die out. 

  2. nathan willard | Nov 7, 2011 at 6:19 pm |

    And we were worried they would exceed our success, how could they ever get real far when the driving force their work force is being continuously poisoned, and stupefied by toxic air and food, a system like that can not sustain itself for very long, the poor living conditions will bring plagues of issues upon the people as well as lead the masses to either revolt or die out. 

    • Anarchy Pony | Nov 7, 2011 at 8:21 pm |

      Its cute that you think they care. A lot of that pollution is thanks to the good old US of A, thanks to all of the outsourced manufacturing. The US has semi breathable air in urban areas because they no longer have nearly as many factories and the like, that’s what’s called an externality.

      • You’re really blaming the US for what is obviously their issue? You act like people don’t buy our manufactured goods. They do, but our air isn’t poor. It’s poor governing, not the market, that’s to blame.

        • Mr Willow | Nov 7, 2011 at 10:56 pm |

          You act like people don’t buy our manufactured goods.

          What goods does the US manufacture again? Drug cartels and terrorist cells (to say nothing of foreign militaries) buy our weapons (generally hand-guns and rifles)—or are sometimes gifted them—and there’s still Zippo, but many of the previous staples (cars) and the majority of the things that are bought today (clothes, appliances, toys, electronics) are manufactured in places like China, Singapore, Vietnam, Belgium, Germany, the Philippines, Korea, and Japan. 

          There are outliers—Wahl products, for example, and portions of Whirlpool—but for the most part, everything has been shipped off, and in many cases, several parts used to build American-manufactured products are imported. 

          Anymore, ‘the market’ is there simply to move money from one hand to another.

        • Anarchy Pony | Nov 8, 2011 at 1:39 am |

          What the fuck are you babbling about?

    • Reptoids | Nov 7, 2011 at 8:32 pm |

      That same spectre of revolution and such that is haunting Europe for the last 200 years appears to be nothing but a poltergeist.  Revolt is not inevitable.  Sadly enough, authoritarian societies are the rule in history, not democracy.

      • Anarchy Pony | Nov 7, 2011 at 9:00 pm |

        Yes, so they should be accepted without question, NOW GET BACK TO WORK, PROLE!

        • Hence the ‘sadly enough’.  I don’t live in a dualistic universe mind you.

  3. Johnnyutah | Nov 7, 2011 at 11:08 pm |

    Hail President Skroob and Dark Helmet!!!

  4. Johnnyutah | Nov 7, 2011 at 7:08 pm |

    Hail President Skroob and Dark Helmet!!!

  5. Yeah! If we run low on clean air we can just steal it from Planet Druidia!

  6. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 12:21 am |

    Its cute that you think they care. A lot of that pollution is thanks to the good old US of A, thanks to all of the outsourced manufacturing. The US has semi breathable air in urban areas because they no longer have nearly as many factories and the like, that’s what’s called an externality.

  7. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 12:21 am |

    Its cute that you think they care. A lot of that pollution is thanks to the good old US of A, thanks to all of the outsourced manufacturing. The US has semi breathable air in urban areas because they no longer have nearly as many factories and the like, that’s what’s called an externality.

  8. That same spectre of revolution and such that is haunting Europe for the last 200 years appears to be nothing but a poltergeist.  Revolt is not inevitable.  Sadly enough, authoritarian societies are the rule in history, not democracy.

  9. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 12:59 am |

    Don’t want to breath it? Then don’t pump it out of your factories mother fuckers. They should be forced to breath deep over the openings those smokestacks for an hour or two.

  10. Anarchy Pony | Nov 7, 2011 at 8:59 pm |

    Don’t want to breath it? Then don’t pump it out of your factories mother fuckers. They should be forced to breath deep over the openings those smokestacks for an hour or two.

    • BuzzCoastin | Nov 7, 2011 at 10:06 pm |

      > Then don’t pump it out of your factories mother fuckers.

      It’s not the factories
      it’s the insentient construction
      and the blow-off from the Gobi desert.

      I live in Beijing
      in the last three years
      35 buildings
      25 stories tall
      have been built in my hood.

      Last night while waiting for a cab
      I noticed the air was thick with dust
      it looked like fog and smelled like shit.

      I’m outa here in 12 months
      and I won’t miss the air.

  11. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 1:00 am |

    Yes, so they should be accepted without question, NOW GET BACK TO WORK, PROLE!

  12. You’re really blaming the US for what is obviously their issue? You act like people don’t buy our manufactured goods. They do, but our air isn’t poor. It’s poor governing, not the market, that’s to blame.

  13. > Then don’t pump it out of your factories mother fuckers.

    It’s not the factories
    it’s the insentient construction
    and the blow-off from the Gobi desert.

    I live in Beijing
    in the last three years
    35 buildings
    25 stories tall
    have been built in my hood.

    Last night while waiting for a cab
    I noticed the air was thick with dust
    it looked like fog and smelled like shit.

    I’m outa here in 12 months
    and I won’t miss the air.

  14. Mr Willow | Nov 8, 2011 at 2:30 am |

    “Creating clean, healthy air for our national leaders is a blessing to the people,” boasts the company’s promotional material.

    They say that as if they expect the vitality of the rulers will trickle-down to the rest of the populace. Where does that sound familiar?. . . 

  15. Mr Willow | Nov 7, 2011 at 10:30 pm |

    “Creating clean, healthy air for our national leaders is a blessing to the people,” boasts the company’s promotional material.

    They say that as if they expect the vitality of the rulers to trickle-down to the rest of the populace. Now, where does that sound familiar?. . .

  16. Mr Willow | Nov 8, 2011 at 2:56 am |

    You act like people don’t buy our manufactured goods.

    What goods do the US manufacture again? Drug cartels and terrorist cells (to say nothing of foreign militaries) buy our weapons (generally hand-guns and rifles)—or are sometimes gifted them—and there’s still Zippo, but many of the previous staples (cars) and the majority of the things that are bought today (clothes, appliances, toys, electronics) are manufactured in places like China, Singapore, Vietnam, Belgium, Germany, the Philippines, Korea, and Japan. 

    There are outliers—Wahl products, for example, and portions of Whirlpool—but for the most part, everything has been shipped off, and in many cases, several parts used to build American-manufactured products are imported. 

    Anymore, ‘the market’ is there simply to move money from one hand to another.

  17. I always wondered when Scrooge McDuck’s fantasy of patenting the air and installing meters on people’s chests to charge them by the breath would transform from fiction into reality. At least I have the peace of knowing that that time has finally come.

  18. I always wondered when Scrooge McDuck’s fantasy of patenting the air and installing meters on people’s chests to charge them by the breath would transform from fiction into reality. At least I have the peace of knowing that that time has finally come.

  19. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 5:39 am |

    What the fuck are you babbling about?

  20. Anti-Citizen1 | Nov 8, 2011 at 5:39 am |

    What the fuck are you babbling about?

  21. Well fuck me! Were all goin ta choke..another tick on the ‘End of Days’ box, so long bros & sisters. Its been great

  22. Well fuck me! Were all goin ta choke..another tick on the ‘End of Days’ box, so long bros & sisters. Its been great

  23. Reptoids | Nov 8, 2011 at 2:15 pm |

    Hence the ‘sadly enough’.  I don’t live in a dualistic universe mind you.

  24. I don’t think it’s been that great, frankly.

  25. Anonymous | Nov 8, 2011 at 3:40 pm |

    This reminds me of the movie Brazil.

  26. This reminds me of the movie Brazil.

Comments are closed.