• DeepCough

    Voltaire (1694-1778) “This is no time to make new enemies.”
    (When asked on his deathbed to forswear Satan.)

  • DeepCough

    Voltaire (1694-1778) “This is no time to make new enemies.”
    (When asked on his deathbed to forswear Satan.)

  • Sickntired

    RIP dude, you were awesome, didn’t agree on your stance on the Irak war, but you always made me think…contrarians are good for society…

  • Sickntired

    RIP dude, you were awesome, didn’t agree on your stance on the Irak war, but you always made me think…contrarians are good for society…

  • StillAtMyMoms

    He’s full of shit.  Originally I was a staunch atheist after reading the wondrous world of quantum mechanics, etc., but it turns out that very field suggests the possibility of an afterlife more so than spirituality and religion I think.  Plus I notice people who are atheist are usually upper middle-class or at the very least live a life of comfort.  What about the people who experienced a demise early in their life?  What about the people who are currently suffering?  Oh sorry you had the misfortune of living a miserable life , but you’re just going to be buried in the ground and decompose; game over.  I’m going the Buddha route with this one, but it is really a valid point.  We don’t know shit.  I’m not saying there is a God, but there is something out there that we cannot pick up due to the limits of our senses.  Maybe alien; maybe not, but who knows.  But hopefully I can meet Hitchens sometime and call him out on it.  As Hicks said, “It’s just a ride.”

    • Mahajohn

      A mystical atheist myself, and a student of human behavior (“there’s definitely definitely definitely no logic”), I am genuinely curious to understand more about your contention that your readings concerning quantum physics opened you up to the idea of an afterlife and the reality of what we might term “supernaturality.”

      I am especially curious because the more I learn about quantum realms and the macrocosmic reality of the universe in which we live, the more and more I come to believe that this is all just a manifestation of inertial natural forces.  That isn’t to say that I am totally comfortable dismissing the entire anecdotal human experience with what I’m referring to as supernaturality.  By that I mean that I am comfortable with dismissing it, but not wholly.  What do I know?  Nothing.  Beyond that, I am assuming that Nature comprises everything that exists, that nothing exists outside the realm of Nature, that was is real is REAL, and what isn’t real IS NOT REAL, and that anything that exists – be if faeries, the Greys, ghosts, angels, whatever – exists as a natural phenomenon no more or less numinous than stars or Elvis or poop or General Tso’s chicken. 

      I think Hitchens is spot-on about our notions of the afterlife though.  The I-am-me-and-will-continue-to-be-so-but-in-a-slightly-different/cooler/more-eternal-way-when-I-die is among the most asinine, childish and human-centric absurdities that we’ve developed.     

      • StillAtMyMoms

        “The I-am-me-and-will-continue-to-be-so-but-in-a-slightly-different/cooler/more-eternal-way-when-I-die is among the most asinine.”

        Then why are humans capable of feeling emotion, empathy, and morality through neural processes?  If evolution is correct, then why are living organisms capable of feeling uncertainty, curiosity, and most importantly: fear of their mortality?  If the human consciousness (or other species for that matter that we have yet to study) questions, let alone become aware, the end of life, it’s apparently crucial for the survival of our very species considering the big tenet of the theory is that in order for a species to survive, it must adapt.  Otherwise what’s the point of having that awareness and curiosity?  I guess you can only argue that we’re still a work in progress?  Soon that imagination and ability to reason rather than just reaching a dreary and bleak conclusion of an absolutist stance will merely taper off after a few million years (given that we exist for that long)?  If that’s the case, I embrace nihilism for the fullest; for there is no point in life.  The whole concept of being just a mathematical probability, and that life is merely a game of chance is bullshit.  And I would personally like to bitch slap the creator, the extraterrestrial, or whatever had the power to wield life on this planet.  It seems to me that you’re advocating existence is just a rigged game based on chance; and that we will never know why exactly how some had it better than others.  Well fuck that!  We had no control how we came to be at this particular place and time.  It just happened and that’s all we really know (or ever know).    What’s the point of it if some privileged, stuffy intellect can advocate the banishment of “fairy tales”?   Before I elaborate any further, let me state right now that I am not inevitably going a religious-filled rhetoric route.  I guess there is two sides to every coin after all.  Quantum mechanics and other related fields propose that everything is a probability; nothing is absolute.  On the flip side, however, it does suggest the possibility of parallel worlds, other dimensions, etc. (Hence my argument for a possible afterlife).  I know some Christians used the conservation of energy as a base argument for the existence of their God, but what if it’s indeed true in the organism form?  That we are all dynamic waves of energy existing (living) perpetually in the vast cosmos and untapped dimensions unrestricted by time.  (Read Biocentrism by Robert Lanza; a scientific argument for solipsism nonetheless).

        I guess atheism is no different than fundamentalist religion, Batman and the Joker, and the yin and yang.  It’s all dualistic rubbish.  Yet I am still a self-described “atheist” in the sense that I don’t believe in any of the “big three” monotheistic Gods, but yet believe in some presence, where we create it or not.  My thoughts can be described at the closing scene of Men in Black 1.

        • StillAtMyMoms

          Err, agnostic minus the whole “bearded man in the sky” quotient I meant.

  • Anonymous

    He’s full of shit.  Originally I was a staunch atheist after reading the wondrous world of quantum mechanics, etc., but it turns out that very field suggests the possibility of an afterlife more so than spirituality and religion I think.  Plus I notice people who are atheist are usually upper middle-class or at the very least live a life of comfort.  What about the people who experienced a demise early in their life?  What about the people who are currently suffering?  Oh sorry you had the misfortune of living a miserable life , but you’re just going to be buried in the ground and decompose; game over.  I’m going the Buddha route with this one, but it is really a valid point.  We don’t know shit.  I’m not saying there is a God, but there is something out there that we cannot pick up due to the limits of our senses.  Maybe alien; maybe not, but who knows.  But hopefully I can meet Hitchens sometime and call him out on it.  As Hicks said, “It’s just a ride.”

  • Mahajohn

    A mystical atheist myself, and a student of human behavior (“there’s definitely definitely definitely no logic”), I am genuinely curious to understand more about your contention that your readings concerning quantum physics opened you up to the idea of an afterlife and the reality of what we might term “supernaturality.”

    I am especially curious because the more I learn about quantum realms and the macrocosmic reality of the universe in which we live, the more and more I come to believe that this is all just a manifestation of inertial natural forces.  That isn’t to say that I am totally comfortable dismissing the entire anecdotal human experience with what I’m referring to as supernaturality.  By that I mean that I am comfortable with dismissing it, but not wholly.  What do I know?  Nothing.  Beyond that, I am assuming that Nature comprises everything that exists, that nothing exists outside the realm of Nature, that was is real is REAL, and what isn’t real IS NOT REAL, and that anything that exists – be if faeries, the Greys, ghosts, angels, whatever – exists as a natural phenomenon no more or less numinous than stars or Elvis or poop or General Tso’s chicken. 

    I think Hitchens is spot-on about our notions of the afterlife though.  The I-am-me-and-will-continue-to-be-so-but-in-a-slightly-different/cooler/more-eternal-way-when-I-die is among the most asinine, childish and human-centric absurdities that we’ve developed.     

  • Anonymous

    “The I-am-me-and-will-continue-to-be-so-but-in-a-slightly-different/cooler/more-eternal-way-when-I-die is among the most asinine.”

    Then why are humans capable of feeling emotion, empathy, and morality through neural processes?  If evolution is correct, then why are living organisms capable of feeling uncertainty, curiosity, and most importantly: fear of their mortality?  If the human consciousness (or other species for that matter that we have yet to study) questions, let alone become aware, the end of life, it’s apparently crucial for the survival of our very species considering the big tenet of the theory is that in order for a species to survive, it must adapt.  Otherwise what’s the point of having that awareness and curiosity?  I guess you can only argue that we’re still a work in progress?  Soon that imagination and ability to reason rather than just reaching a dreary and bleak conclusion of an absolutist stance will merely taper off after a few million years (given that we exist for that long)?  If that’s the case, I embrace nihilism for the fullest; for there is no point in life.  The whole concept of being just a mathematical probability, and that life is merely a game of chance is bullshit.  And I would personally like to bitch slap the creator, the extraterrestrial, or whatever had the power to wield life on this planet.  It seems to me that you’re advocating existence is just a rigged game based on chance; and that we will never know why exactly how some had it better than others.  Well fuck that!  We had no control how we came to be at this particular place and time.  It just happened and that’s all we really know (or ever know).    What’s the point of it if some privileged, stuffy intellect can advocate the banishment of “fairy tales”?   Before I elaborate any further, let me state right now that I am not inevitably going a religious-filled rhetoric route.  I guess there is two sides to every coin after all.  Quantum mechanics and other related fields propose that everything is a probability; nothing is absolute.  On the flip side, however, it does suggest the possibility of parallel worlds, other dimensions, etc. (Hence my argument for a possible afterlife).  I know some Christians used the conservation of energy as a base argument for the existence of their God, but what if it’s indeed true in the organism form?  That we are all dynamic waves of energy existing (living) perpetually in the vast cosmos and untapped dimensions unrestricted by time.  (Read Biocentrism by Robert Lanza; a scientific argument for solipsism nonetheless).

    I guess atheism is no different than fundamentalist religion, Batman and the Joker, and the yin and yang.  It’s all dualistic rubbish.  Yet I am still a self-described “atheist” in the sense that I don’t believe in any of the “big three” monotheistic Gods, but yet believe in some presence, where we create it or not.  My thoughts can be described at the closing scene of Men in Black 1.

  • Anonymous

    Err, agnostic minus the whole “bearded man in the sky” quotient I meant.

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