Presenting Earth 2.0

kepler22b-0Is this where humankind will be living in a couple millenia? In a solar system 600 light years away spins the newly-spotted Kebler 22-b, a rocky planet with oceans covering two-thirds of its surface, and balmy temperatures approximating 70 degrees. The Herald Sun reports on the greatest hope for a replacement Earth:

A newly discovered planet about 600 light years from our little rock has scientists around the world in a spin, with many heralding it as the best chance yet of containing alien life.

The find, announced early last week by NASA, was uncovered by the US space agency’s Kepler spacecraft, launched on a planet-hunting mission in 2009.

The planet, Kepler-22b, is 2.4 times bigger than Earth, orbits a star slightly smaller than our sun and has an average temperature of 22C. It is also closer to its sun-like star, giving it a “year” of 290 days.

What makes this discovery so exciting is that it is the smallest planet right in the middle of what has been dubbed the Goldilocks zone, where it’s not too hot and not too cold to either boil or freeze water, vital for life as we know it.

“It’s very exciting,” said University of Sydney astronomer Dennis Stello, who works on the Kepler project. “This is the first time we have actually found such a small planet in the habitable zone.”

51 Comments on "Presenting Earth 2.0"

  1. Resource zombie. | Dec 14, 2011 at 9:24 pm |

    The movie Independence day makes sense now.

  2. Resource zombie. | Dec 14, 2011 at 5:24 pm |

    The movie Independence day makes sense now.

  3. Sweet, when do we get to go? 

  4. Sweet, when do we get to go? 

  5. DeepCough | Dec 14, 2011 at 10:15 pm |

    Agent Smith is right: we humans are like a virus: we’re just looking to infect another celestial body with our filthy, filthy DNA.

  6. DeepCough | Dec 14, 2011 at 6:15 pm |

    Agent Smith is right: we humans are like a virus: we’re just looking to infect another celestial body with our filthy, filthy DNA.

    • Mind you, we’re looking about 600 years into the past. For all we know, the conditions on that planet 600 years ago may have been conducive for the development of an advanced civilization within several centuries from then. If so, earth might be in its inhabitant’s sights. Our planet may be seen as a “second home” by another species looking to spread its “filthy DNA.”

      • *Earth*

      • well said. amazing they just assume there isn’t already abundant life there as I would bet everything there is. Life is everywhere you stupid bastard scientists, quit pretending you don’t know that.

      • The most counterintuitive/unusual remarks I’ve ever heard on alien life are by this guy Nick Bostrom who’s apparently a genius of the sort that other geniuses think is pretty damn clever. He says discovering un-advanced life might mean it is common but that’s bad news because it likely means that since we’ve not yet discovered or come into contact with advanced life that higher intelligent species go extinct fairly quickly.

        If curious type in the words — “Nick Bostrom on the Fermi Paradox” on YouTube

        • I appreciate the sobering prospective he offers. However, on a personal note, I hope he’s wrong. I like the idea of there being an abundance of advanced intelligent life permeating the galaxy.

      • mysophobe | Dec 15, 2011 at 1:56 am |

        What if we met that planet’s occupants, out in space, headed toward our planet with the same idea because they ruined their home too. The ensuing head-scratching “what now?” moment would be hilarious to watch on YouniverseTube.

  7. Anonymous | Dec 15, 2011 at 12:14 am |

    I like the fake picture of the planet. I looks like an inhospitable gas giant. Good job.

  8. I like the fake picture of the planet. I looks like an inhospitable gas giant. Good job.

  9. Mind you, we’re looking about 600 years into the past. For all we know, the conditions on that planet 600 years ago may have been conducive for the development of an advanced civilization within several centuries from then. If so, earth might be in its inhabitant’s sights. Our planet may be seen as a “second home” by another species looking to spread its “filthy DNA.”

  10. *Earth*

  11. It is in fact Neptune. Completely unrelated gas giant.

  12. We have to prevent interstellar colonialism and imperialism!

  13. We have to prevent interstellar colonialism and imperialism!

  14. well said. amazing they just assume there isn’t already abundant life there as I would bet everything there is. Life is everywhere you stupid bastard scientists, quit pretending you don’t know that.

  15. Earth is not a “solid rock” either btw…

  16. Anonymous | Dec 15, 2011 at 1:02 am |

    Ah. Well I guess people would have recognized Uranus.

  17. Earth is not a “solid rock” either btw…

  18. Anonymous | Dec 15, 2011 at 2:49 am |

    Nick
    Bostrom on the Fermi Paradox

  19. Suddenly Spam! | Dec 15, 2011 at 4:12 am |

    We’ll be dumbfounded when we land, wake up from cryosleep… and find our ship being ransacked and carted off to alien area 51.

  20. We’ll be dumbfounded when we land, wake up from cryosleep… and find our ship being ransacked and carted off to alien area 51.

  21. if we send the politicians and the banksters first
    and we send them tomorrow
    we can enjoy several thousand years of peace and quite
    before they figure out
    that we got rid of them

  22. BuzzCoastin | Dec 15, 2011 at 1:13 am |

    if we send the politicians and the banksters first
    and we send them tomorrow
    we can enjoy several thousand years of peace and quite
    before they figure out
    that we got rid of them

  23. Anonymous | Dec 15, 2011 at 5:56 am |

    What if we met that planet’s occupants, out in space, headed toward our planet with the same idea because they ruined their home too. The ensuing head-scratching “what now?” moment would be hilarious to watch on YouniverseTube.

  24. I appreciate the sobering prospective he offers. However, on a personal note, I hope he’s wrong. I like the idea of there being an abundance of advanced intelligent life permeating the galaxy.

  25. Lmnop_nis | Dec 15, 2011 at 8:59 am |

    600 light years away, huh? And yet they know what this planet looks and feels like? Right. How would mankind even reach it if it even was what they supposed? Gimme a break. We as a species are doomed to die on this rock.

  26. Lmnop_nis | Dec 15, 2011 at 8:59 am |

    600 light years away, huh? And yet they know what this planet looks and feels like? Right. How would mankind even reach it if it even was what they supposed? Gimme a break. We as a species are doomed to die on this rock.

  27. Lmnop_nis | Dec 15, 2011 at 4:59 am |

    600 light years away, huh? And yet they know what this planet looks and feels like? Right. How would mankind even reach it if it even was what they supposed? Gimme a break. We as a species are doomed to die on this rock.

    • Well, obviously they’re not proposing this anytime soon… That’s why if you use your eyes and look at the first sentence, it says this “Is this where humankind will be living in a couple millenia?” … Yea, eyes do wonders for you man if you use em.

  28. Acidninja | Dec 15, 2011 at 10:18 am |

    That looks like a picture of Neptune

  29. Acidninja | Dec 15, 2011 at 6:18 am |

    That looks like a picture of Neptune

    • Isreal Lawrence | Dec 16, 2011 at 9:59 am |

      im pretty sure it is. i know i used the exact same photo in a piece i wrote on the ‘black knight satellite’ on my own blog a year or two ago.

  30. YayFascism | Dec 15, 2011 at 5:01 pm |

    Let’s send some fascist corporatists over there to fuck up that planet too!  Go humans!!

  31. YayFascism | Dec 15, 2011 at 1:01 pm |

    Let’s send some fascist corporatists over there to fuck up that planet too!  Go humans!!

  32. Anonymous | Dec 15, 2011 at 6:06 pm |

    The only thing I find disturbing about fantasies to colonize that planet is the implication that humans will somehow be involved.

    Anyhow, between now and the time we end up cr*pping that planet up, too, we can at least enjoy one indisputable fact; with 290 day years, the average individual can look forward to living 20% longer.

    Provided that a Keppler 22b day is still 24 hours long.

  33. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 15, 2011 at 2:06 pm |

    The only thing I find disturbing about fantasies to colonize that planet is the implication that humans will somehow be involved.

    Anyhow, between now and the time we end up cr*pping that planet up, too, we can at least enjoy one indisputable fact; with 290 day years, the average individual can look forward to living 20% longer.

    Provided that a Keppler 22b day is still 24 hours long.

  34. Isreal Lawrence | Dec 16, 2011 at 1:59 pm |

    im pretty sure it is. i know i used the exact same photo in a piece i wrote on the ‘black knight satellite’ on my own blog a year or two ago.

  35. Lmnop_nis | Dec 16, 2011 at 7:12 pm |

    Shut up. Fucktard.

  36. Lmnop_nis | Dec 16, 2011 at 7:13 pm |

    Well played, sir.

  37. Well, obviously they’re not proposing this anytime soon… That’s why if you use your eyes and look at the first sentence, it says this “Is this where humankind will be living in a couple millenia?” … Yea, eyes do wonders for you man if you use em.

  38. Lmnop_nis | Jan 24, 2012 at 6:23 am |

    Hey, dickface. My point is that we as a very destructive, hostile species are not gonna live another couple of millennia. We are doomed by our own stupidity to kill the planet and ourselves along with it. Yea,that’s why if you use your brain you might be able to pick up on other peoples meanings instead of making retarded remarks out of your own stupidity. Yea, brains do wonders for you man if you use em.

  39. isnt that pic of neptune??

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