Santa Claus: Dybbuk, Tulpa, Legend

FreakingNews.com

FreakingNews.com

What is it about this time of year that melts even the hardest disinfonaut scepticism? Sure, Santa Claus might be the old shamanic magic mushroom cult incarnate repackaged to dupe us all into developing a Pavlovian response to the Baron Samedi of consumerism that he has now become, but I’ve always suspected the rabbit hole went down deeper.

And then I came across this blog post by  paranormal researcher Jeff Belanger:

My friend Al told me he was struggling with telling his four-year-old daughter about Santa Claus. “It’s the only lie I’ve ever told her,” he said. I too have a four-year-old daughter and am currently in the thick of Santa Fever at my house, where we’ve been lauding Père Noël for the last three Christmases. He’s a legend I’m honored to propagate.

I study legends for a living. Monsters, ghosts, extraterrestrials, and ancient mysteries swirl around me like smoke from a smoldering campfire. If there’s one thing that’s certain: it’s that all legends have a solid foundation in someone’s reality. From there the story grows and evolves; it becomes part of a collective human experience. Legends are real. The point can’t be argued.

His bio page proclaims him to be “the founder of the new legend tripping movement” (www.legendtripping.com), so at first glance he might know something whereof he speaks. The post is full of high and cheerful Christmas strangeness – especially his theory that Old St Nick is a benevolent dybbuk, normally a malevalent type of spirit possession from Jewish folklore – so I recommend you read it in full.

For my part, I’m haunted by the slightly different possibility that Father Christmas might be what is known in the Himalayan shamanic and Buddhist traditions as a tulpa - a being or object created through willpower, visualisation, concerted intentionality and ritual; a materialized thought that has taken physical form.

This may seem even more far fetched, but I’d be in good company. Alvin Schwartz, the man synonymous with the creation of Superman comic strips in the 1940s and ‘50s, wrote in his 1997 autobiography An Unlikely Prophet (a book that according to Neil Gaiman, who no stranger to gods old, new and American, is “one of the great Odd Books of our time”, and again he should know) that Superman had become a tulpa and that a Hawaiian kahuna told him Superman once traveled 2,000 years back in time to keep the island chain from being destroyed by volcanic activity. Schwartz went on to tell of his own encounter with Superman in a New York taxi.

I’ll leave you with Belanger’s final thoughts on the subject:

Believe in Santa … His legend is real. He’s real. He’s you. He’s me. He’s a bit of all of us. And next year he’ll be back, because we’ll never stop needing him.

If that doesn’t sound like a job for a Superman, I’ll eat my mistletoe.

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  • JohnFrancisBittrich

    Interestingly enough, Grant Morrison also claims to have actually met Superman once! They had a conversation which was instrumental in how the character is written and portrayed in “All-Star Superman”… I’ll try to find the interview and link it.

  • http://soundcloud.com/rubyridge fivetonsofflax

    Interestingly enough, Grant Morrison also claims to have actually met Superman once! They had a conversation which was instrumental in how the character is written and portrayed in “All-Star Superman”… I’ll try to find the interview and link it.

  • T Ska

    Amanita muscaria mushrooms were eaten first primarily by Siberian mushroom cults, where once at the winter solstice every year would descend into the village from there isolation dressed in red and white robes handing the mushroom out door to door so the village can experience it once with them a year. it grows only in pine trees, and reindeer have been eating them for as long as man have. they would often share trips with the reindeer, seeing visions of the fly and such. all of the christmas music you hear often speak of escape, and dreamy landscapes, and visions, even the bells related to there tone and shape and shine could be related to the experience on the mushroom. or not..

    • Artor

      The mushrooms themselves are toxic and potentially deadly, but there is a method to render them saf(er) for initiates with less hardy livers. The psychoactive alkaloids are not metabolized, but pass through the system unchanged. When a reindeer eats the Muscaria, it’s liver filters out all the toxins while Rudolph takes a flying trip around the world. Wen it urinates afterwards, a shaman can collect the effluvium and offer it to his initiates, who “enjoy” (blech!) the effects without risking permanent liver damage.

  • T Ska

    Amanita muscaria mushrooms were eaten first primarily by Siberian mushroom cults, where once at the winter solstice every year would descend into the village from there isolation dressed in red and white robes handing the mushroom out door to door so the village can experience it once with them a year. it grows only in pine trees, and reindeer have been eating them for as long as man have. they would often share trips with the reindeer, seeing visions of the fly and such. all of the christmas music you hear often speak of escape, and dreamy landscapes, and visions, even the bells related to there tone and shape and shine could be related to the experience on the mushroom. or not..

  • Anonymous

    The mushrooms themselves are toxic and potentially deadly, but there is a method to render them saf(er) for initiates with less hardy livers. The psychoactive alkaloids are not metabolized, but pass through the system unchanged. When a reindeer eats the Muscaria, it’s liver filters out all the toxins while Rudolph takes a flying trip around the world. Wen it urinates afterwards, a shaman can collect the effluvium and offer it to his initiates, who “enjoy” (blech!) the effects without risking permanent liver damage.

  • Nunya
  • Calypso_1

    A flagon of reindeer mushroom piss beer for all this merry yuletide!

  • Anonymous

    A flagon of reindeer mushroom piss beer for all the merry yuletile!

  • Gregory Wyrdmaven

    What is Santa Claus?  He’s the good, benevolent, self-sacrificing nature of our higher selves.  And in a Capitalist society, he’s only allowed to come out once a year.

  • Gregory Wyrdmaven

    What is Santa Claus?  He’s the good, benevolent, self-sacrificing nature of our higher selves.  And in a Capitalist society, he’s only allowed to come out once a year.

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