Looking For A ‘Doomsday Date’?

Survival Under Atomic AttackAlice Bell writes in the Guardian:

“Doomsday dating” really does exist: websites designed to match those with particular skills and resources for dealing with disaster, be it nuclear attack, extreme weather or economic collapse. Only in the US, perhaps, but with the petrol panics of last week (not to mention that “well from hell” off the coast of Scotland) maybe we could do with a version for dear old Blighty.

If you prefer fictional romance to the point-and-click experience of internet dating, Daniel Kramb has a book about love and climate change activism out next month, complete with the tagline “They want the burning to stop. She wants hers to begin”. He’s not the first author to explore the new politics of love in a changing climate either. I’ve come across the issue in the course of my academic research on children’s science literature. Take, for example, Saci Lloyd’s Carbon Diaries; a teenager’s diary set in a near future where Britain has implemented strict carbon rationing (think Adrian Mole crossed with An Inconvenient Truth).

Alongside having to cope with growing their own food and changing gap-year plans, the young characters explicitly discuss “carbon dating”, finding themselves drawn to engineering types who can make, fix, predict and understand things rather than the cool, pretty kids in the band. A warning though: in the end the nerdy boyfriend heartlessly leaves our heroine to study at an energy futures lab in Germany.

Read More: Guardian

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  • Shiva Recoil

    This doomsday dating seems like the secular equivalent of Rapture Ready.