High Fructose Corn Syrup Can Make You Dumb

Corn_syrupYou have been warned (via AFP/Yahoo News):

Eating too much sugar can eat away at your brainpower, according to US scientists who published a study Tuesday showing how a steady diet of high-fructose corn syrup sapped lab rats’ memories.

Researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) fed two groups of rats a solution containing high-fructose corn syrup — a common ingredient in processed foods — as drinking water for six weeks. One group of rats was supplemented with brain-boosting omega-3 fatty acids in the form of flaxseed oil and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), while the other group was not.

Before the sugar drinks began, the rats were enrolled in a five-day training session in a complicated maze. After six weeks on the sweet solution, the rats were then placed back in the maze to see how they fared. “The DHA-deprived animals were slower, and their brains showed a decline in synaptic activity,” said Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA…

[continues at via AFP/Yahoo News]

majestic

Majestic is gadfly emeritus.

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16 Comments on "High Fructose Corn Syrup Can Make You Dumb"

  1. Jin The Ninja | May 16, 2012 at 1:26 pm |

    the ubiquity of it- in nearly all processed food (or a cane sugar analogue) is deeply disturbing.

  2. Why do they always seam to compare humans with rats? Not being a wise a** I seriously do not know. 

    • Jin The Ninja | May 16, 2012 at 2:06 pm |

      calypso may be better equiped intellectually to answer, but i believe it is because rats are quite physiologically similar and their biological systems process things like food, medicinal ingredients, and toxins not unlike human beings. also it makes for an interesting socio-political analogy.

      • Calypso_1 | May 16, 2012 at 2:30 pm |

        That and for some reason we’re not allowed to breed humans, give them untested drugs and slice them up. 

        • Jin The Ninja | May 16, 2012 at 3:00 pm |

           there is also that!

        • Monkey See Monkey Do | May 17, 2012 at 4:19 am |

          Aside from breeding humans in a laboratory. I don’t see anything ethically wrong with testing drugs on consenting terminally ill adults. It’s true many untested drugs can be highly toxic, the pharmaceutical industry will have to move away from the highly industrialized petro-chemicals and synthetics that dominate the health industry. Those chemicals only dominate the industry for capitalistic purposes anyhow.

  3. So the Supernatural tv series was right?! Is this means that we are gona all be eaten by Monsanto’s right-wing monsters?

  4. I wonder if we would have heard about this study if they found that the high fructose corn syrup made the rats smarter.

  5. Yet I see the human subjects finding their way to the Quicky mart to recharge their  72 ounce thirsts with ease.

  6. Well now, did you think it made you smarter..? People need to be a little more open to these conspiracy theories floating around. I’m starting to believe they really are trying to poison us by putting this shit in everything. It’s actually hard for me to find food and drinks without HFCS in it. 

  7. just curious | May 16, 2012 at 7:37 pm |

    I dont think that was a fair test .. one set of rats were given a brain booster while the other one was given corn syrup …… why the brain booster ??? if you are testing to see the results of corn syrup then just use corn syrup on some and plain water on the others … that test was unjust …

  8. DeepCough | May 17, 2012 at 3:12 pm |

    Thank you, High Fructose Corn Syrup, for making Pepsi and Coca Cola are such popular and profitable products.

  9. John Myers | May 17, 2012 at 7:31 pm |

    Bariatric physicians now refer to Alzheimer’s disease as ‘type 3 diabetes’. Increased insulin levels over time gums up the brain’s signaling mechanism.

  10. 6Blackie6 | May 31, 2012 at 6:01 am |

    I don’t need a rat to tell me that… Just go look in a McDonald’s or a Wal-Mart. Full of smart people!
    But I guess if they were smart to begin with they wouldn’t eat all that crappy processed garbage in the first place.

  11. lol, you people commenting are so hilarious.  Not one of you noticed the line that said the DHA deprived animals were slower and had decreased synaptic activity.  The whole story is crap because it’s not about what the rats are fed, like the title would have you believe, but what they are not being fed.  Where is the independent variable, the sugar or the DHA?  They should have established a baseline where the control got regular drinking water and the experimental got the corn syrup in place of water.  Adding the DHA is bad science in this case and proves nothing.  Not to mention the fact that HFCS contains water fructose and glucose, 2 basic sugars, one of which is the preferred “fuel” of our brains, guess which one.

  12. 1776Mariner | Feb 27, 2014 at 9:52 pm |

    Forget the brain studies. This is what we do know already: I learned from an endocrinologist that HFC is metabolized in the liver just like ethanol, the alcohol in beer and liquor. Our livers can take a little bit of ethanol, as in enjoying a couple of beers or glasses of wine occasionally, but if you drink lots of it everyday, as with alcoholics, it scars the liver causing “cirrhosis of the liver” as well as a disease called “fatty liver”. Well, we have HFC in everything it seems. It is in jelly, jams, soda, ketchup, chocolate syrup, yogurt, pancake syrup, breads, etc. So, if you drink a can of soda every day and also consume the HFC in all the other foods, it is easy to exceed the safe level of HFC and start doing liver damage. This is why you will have patients with diagnosis of “cirrhosis of the liver (non alcoholic)” now whereby decades ago this was not the case. So don’t consume HFC in high amounts. Cut the soft drinks to start with and start reading labels. We were always told HFC is not good for us but until that doctor gave out that info, I had no clue as to what it did.

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