Ten Great Reasons to Kill America’s Ban on Growing Hemp

Aleks (CC)

Alternet’s Scott Thill writing at Wake Up World:

America’s industrial ban on hemp is “a poster child for dumb regulation,” argues lazy ass pothead! Wait, sorry, scratch that. Make that Senator Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, introducing an amendment last week to the densely contested 2012 Farm Bill, which is either a subsidies and sustainability savior or callous food austerity, depending on who you ask. But if you ask Wyden, “the best possible Farm Bill” is one that repeals a ban on industrial hemp the United States is already quite busy, and expensively, importing from the few feet it takes to cross the Canadian border.

“I will be urging my colleagues to support this amendment,” Wyden announced last week on the Senate floor, reminding the assembled elected that his plan won’t cost American taxpayers a dime. “I want [them] to know I will be back at this again until there are smarter regulations in place.”

“America needs to get real about hemp, and fast, even if the country continues to fight about ending cannabis prohibition,” National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) executive director Allen St. Pierre told AlterNet. “There is virtually no one on earth who intellectually opposes farmers cultivating industrial hemp, other than anti-cannabis bureaucracies, politicians, drug testing companies and the U.S. law enforcement community.”

That’s some stacked opposition. But the list below provides more than enough firepower for encouraging an overdue repeal of the ban on industrial hemp, cannabis sativa’s low-THC strain.

1. America buys hemp from Canada anyway.

Maybe we should just burn money, too? “We’re already importing a crop that the U.S. farmer could be profitably growing right here at home, if not for government rules prohibiting it,” Wyden argued, reminding listeners that in 2010, Canada subsidized its hemp industry with over $700,000 more in funding, increased crop sizes and “fortified the inroads the Canadians are making in U.S. markets at the expense of our farmers.” All while our hemp imports have grown 300 percent in the last decade, and 35 percent since 2009…

[continues at Wake Up World]

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  • Anarchy Pony

    Because it is way better than cotton for one. It can fairly easily be grown in a number of different environments. Perfect as a source of fiber during and after transition to a low energy society. It can also be used as a source of paper. Biofuels, I can take or leave.

    • Monkey See Monkey Do

      Seems like a fucking super-plant.
      Hemp oil is a super food. – Very efficient Biomass fuel. – makes carbon-negative concerete.(hempcrete) – It can replace the oil in plastic. – Makes far more efficient paper, pulp and clothing (we can save the forests)- It can make building materials (structures etc.). Its extremely environmentally friendly (it actually repairs the environment around it far better than most plants known). It can act as a mental or physical medicine for a whole array of illnesses and diseases.

      And it’s illegal in most places of the world……

      • Heath

        Indeed, but the constant factor in all of this is “water”. Which is a whole other discussion.

        • Anarchy Pony

          True enough.

        • Monkey See Monkey Do

          It’s not really a whole other discussion, please, discuss.

          • Heath

            Essentially the “super plant” requires water to grow, and land, resources. Bio fuel fermentation requires water, fuel, resources. Currently bio-fuels are huge water consumers. Hemp wouldn’t be any different. For the most part any manner of manufacturing hemp as a product requires water. Is it more efficient I would agree with that. How ever is it going to save use from consumption, and the current state of the worlds water supply’s. Honestly I see a money maker, but for whom? 

          • Redacted

            I like the idea of hempcrete. Maybe it can be used in playgrounds.

          • Heath

            Essentially the “super plant” requires water to grow, and land, resources. Bio fuel fermentation requires water, fuel, resources. Currently bio-fuels are huge water consumers. Hemp wouldn’t be any different. For the most part any manner of manufacturing hemp as a product requires water. Is it more efficient I would agree with that. How ever is it going to save use from consumption, and the current state of the worlds water supply’s. Honestly I see a money maker, but for whom? 

  • http://buzzcoastin.posterous.com BuzzCoastin

    hemp has been illegal in the Land of the Free since 1937
    which is why they call that place
    The Land of the Free

  • guest

    The idea that this renewable energy resource could be a significant game-changer by uprooting hydrocarbon and synthetics industries and threaten these interlaced economies is probably a huge reason behind its prohibition.       

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