The Codex Aleppo Mystery

This New York Times Magazine story by Ronen Bergman reads like a real-life Dan Brown novel (the background parts where our hero laboriously explains the significance of an historical artifact, anyway):

One day this spring, on the condition that I not reveal any details of its location nor the stringent security measures in place to protect its contents, I entered a hidden vault at the Israel Museum and gazed upon the Aleppo Codex — the oldest, most complete, most accurate text of the Hebrew Bible. The story of how it arrived here, in Jerusalem, is a tale of ancient fears and modern prejudices, one that touches on one of the rawest nerves in Israeli society: the clash of cultures between Jews from Arab countries and the European Jews, or Ashkenazim, who controlled the country during its formative years. And the story of how some 200 pages of the codex went missing — and to this day remain the object of searches carried out around the globe by biblical scholars, private investigators, shadowy businessmen and the Mossad, Israel’s intelligence agency — is one of the great mysteries in Jewish history.

As a small group of us stood in a circle inside the vault in which the codex now resides, Michael Maggen, the head of the museum’s paper-conservation lab, donned a pair of gloves and carefully lifted one of its unbound pages, covered with three columns of beautiful calligraphy, for us to see. The pages were made from animal hides that were stretched and bleached and cut to make parchment; the scribe’s ink was made of powdered tree galls mixed with iron sulfate and black soot. “Considering the difficult conditions that the manuscript suffered over a great many years,” James Snyder, the museum’s director, said, “it is in remarkably excellent condition.” Snyder was happy to talk about how fortunate the museum was to be able to display the codex alongside the 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls and about the painstaking restoration that has taken place. But he refused to speculate on the sensitive question of where the missing pages, which constitute about 40 percent of the codex and whose value is estimated to be in the many millions of dollars, might be and how they might have disappeared.

To talk to the many individuals who are obsessed with finding the missing portions of the codex or solving the mystery of who stole them, or whose histories are somehow bound up with the story of the book, is to get a glimpse of the power it has held over people for more than a thousand years…

[continues in the New York Times Magazine]

, , , , ,

  • Calypso_1

    “It was said that women who looked upon it would become pregnant.”
     
    What is it with this Yahweh character?!

    • lifobryan

      O Cum All Ye Faithful

    • http://buzzcoastin.posterous.com BuzzCoastin

      Yahweh, like Big Homelander
      is a watcher
      but their watching has consequences

  • http://buzzcoastin.posterous.com BuzzCoastin

    since it’s a NYT article
    the story is designed to serve some elite purpose
    probably designed to support Israel in some way
    as well as keep the god thing going
    and god knows we couldn’t live without god watching over his mess