Honduras Signs Deal To Allow Investors To Build Three Privately Run Cities

Well, corporations have nothing but contempt for local laws, people, or cultures, so their pursuing this extranational private city-colony model makes sense. The Washington Post reports:

Investors can begin construction in six months on three privately run cities in Honduras that will have their own police, laws, government and tax systems now that the government has signed a memorandum of agreement approving the project. An international group of investors and government representatives signed the memorandum Tuesday for the project that some say will bring badly needed economic growth to this small Central American country and that at least one detractor describes as “a catastrophe.”

The project “has the potential to turn Honduras into an engine of wealth,” said Carlos Pineda, president of the Commission for the Promotion of Public-Private Partnerships.

The project is opposed by civic groups as well as the indigenous Garifuna people. Oscar Cruz, a former constitutional prosecutor, filed a motion with the Supreme Court last year characterizing the project as unconstitutional and “a catastrophe for Honduras.”

“The cities involve the creation of a state within the state, a commercial entity with state powers outside the jurisdiction of the government,” Cruz said.

33 Comments on "Honduras Signs Deal To Allow Investors To Build Three Privately Run Cities"

  1. Anarchy Pony | Sep 11, 2012 at 11:48 am |

    Where’s Robocop when you need him?

  2. Hadrian999 | Sep 11, 2012 at 11:59 am |

    a real life bioshock

    • Jin The Ninja | Sep 11, 2012 at 1:13 pm |

       when i found out that game was based on ‘objectivist’ philosophy i resolved myself (not too difficult in any case)  not to play it.

  3. How is this “international group of investors” going to profit from this?

    • MadHierophant | Sep 11, 2012 at 12:41 pm |

      Maybe by having what FoxConn does be totally legal in their own territory without using the pretense of “internships”. Or legally enforced “corporate culture.”

      Gross… 

    • Hadrian999 | Sep 11, 2012 at 1:13 pm |

      all kinds of ways, set it up as a tax haven, base of research that would be illegal other places, use it as some sort of giant psychology experiment. all sorts of things they could do to make money off of a no law no extradition treaty zone

    • TapMeYouFascists | Sep 11, 2012 at 5:27 pm |

      Imagine the most base, vile thing you can bare to comprehend, These people will do what it takes to make money, including and not limited to that. The vultures of humanity can use their lawless cities to transport slaves, drugs and launder money; just to name a few things.

    • Privatizing government services is VERY profitable. Prices to taxpayers go up, profit enhanced by reducing service quality, win-win. 

    •  One word ‘sexploitation’.

  4. Neo-Neo-Colonialism?

    • Jin The Ninja | Sep 11, 2012 at 1:13 pm |

      i think they call that ‘post modern’ neo-colonialism with dystopian features.

  5. Infvocuernos | Sep 11, 2012 at 2:27 pm |

    Wonder how long they had to search until they found an indigenous people that hadn’t been taken advantage of some how.  Good old fashioned colonial evil in the 21st century. 
      

  6. Economic growth is unnecessary.

    • Handful of Soil | Sep 11, 2012 at 3:15 pm |

      That’s the bravest thing anyone can say today. I’m not brave enough to say it myself.

      Well done.

    • In Latin America when you hear the sentence “has the potential to turn (…) into an engine of wealth”, you know there is a scam coming.

  7. Auto5734955 | Sep 11, 2012 at 4:26 pm |

    Agreements in Honduras are subject to Honduran courts….After the cities are built and Honduras likes the looks of them they could decide to re neg on their contract* and retake possession of the cities.  Who’s to stop them, the police in the cities?  Honduras will have the army on their side and the ability to block the ingress of re-enforcements (for the city police) and supplies.  They cannot claim aid from other countries military is they are autonomous and if they do call for and accept help from some other country they could then be deemed responsible for back taxes to that country. This could backlash real good for them. 
    *They re negged  on the election of their president and made it stick, do you not think these “multi-national investors” were not involved in that?  Do you really think three cities were planned in the space of just two short years, with along with the compromise of sovereignty of the land, and the laws of the country.

    • One assumes the investor groups bought enough politicians and bribed enough members of the native elite to make this a nonissue.

  8. “The project “has the potential to turn Honduras into an engine of
    wealth,” said Carlos Pineda, president of the Commission for the
    Promotion of Public-Private Partnerships.”

    Uh, more like a river of shit.

  9. > three privately run cities in Honduras that will have their own
    police, laws, government and tax systems

    How is this different from the present system in the US?
    Except for the terms “privately run cities”
    it sounds exactly the same as the US.

    To my knowledge there are no cities under the direct control of the central gov
    except D.C., one the best of the privately run corporate cities in Amerika.

  10. Manuel Zelaya was overthrown several years ago,back to the bad old days for Honduras! The wealth will all go into the pockets of a few oligarchs just like always!!

  11. Ted Heistman | Sep 12, 2012 at 11:40 am |

    In some ways I think it would be fun to build a “privately owned city” I am into Urban planning and Green Design, and have read all these cool books about the subject. I kind of like the idea of starting with a blighted depopulated landscape and restoring it to ecological health. Then attracting people to come and live there once its been transformed.

    I don’t know if building things by consensus is always the best way. There are some examples in China, where a type of technocratic elite of biologists and geologists restored a huge swath of desert into a veritable cornucopia. The people in the area thought they were retarded and that it would never work but they went along with it because they were offered shares in it or something like that. So it was more of a top down thing but it really worked.

  12. Ted Heistman | Sep 12, 2012 at 12:31 pm |

    Anyone interested in this subject should read “the Market State”

  13. Cytotoxic | Sep 18, 2012 at 11:41 pm |

    Hell yeah! It’s time we started tearing down authority. We will replace it with our individuality.

    • A “commercial entity with state powers outside the jurisdiction of the government” with it’s “own police, laws, government and tax systems” is not individuality without authority.

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