Brazil Announces National System Of Mandatory Radio-Frequency ID Chips For Vehicles

Brazil’s new roadway surveillance system, the administration of which apparently involves private contractors, is dubbed SINIAV, and involves installing antennae at strategic points across the country to detect details of all passing cars via windshield-mounted RFID chips. On Boing Boing, Cory Doctorow explains:

In Brazil, a new regulation requires drivers to add radio ID tags to their car windshields, which broadcast “vehicle year or fabrication, make, model, combustible, engine power and license plate number.” This will be read by checkpoints throughout the country, and centrally processed and retained, in a system called Siniav.

The administration claims that this system will be “confidential and secure” because its contractors will sign confidentiality agreements.

29 Comments on "Brazil Announces National System Of Mandatory Radio-Frequency ID Chips For Vehicles"

  1. Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 2:35 pm |

    One more reason to walk on feet or bicycle.

  2. Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 2:35 pm |

    One more reason to walk on feet or bicycle.

    • Umm walking and bikes are not the answer, thats going backwards. We need smaller cars all around, put a limit on how big your car can be and how much power it has in a high traffic area. Leave the SUV’s and trucks to people that live in remote areas or need an open bed for work, a special class of vehicles. Sophisticated public transportation also helps. But this RFID crap is fishy and cheap and will probably just be used for marketing and to bring more money to the government and their contractors via imposed traffic violations. 

    • Umm walking and bikes are not the answer, thats going backwards. We need smaller cars all around, put a limit on how big your car can be and how much power it has in a high traffic area. Leave the SUV’s and trucks to people that live in remote areas or need an open bed for work, a special class of vehicles. Sophisticated public transportation also helps. But this RFID crap is fishy and cheap and will probably just be used for marketing and to bring more money to the government and their contractors via imposed traffic violations. 

      • Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 4:21 pm |

         By walking I (kind of) meant public transportation too… but here in Brazil it works like shit, so everyone who has money to do so, buys a car. Only to get stuck in traffic. Small cars are good for the enviroment, but they get stuck in traffic the same, and riding a motorbike is like signing your own death sentence.

      • Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 4:21 pm |

         By walking I (kind of) meant public transportation too… but here in Brazil it works like shit, so everyone who has money to do so, buys a car. Only to get stuck in traffic. Small cars are good for the enviroment, but they get stuck in traffic the same, and riding a motorbike is like signing your own death sentence.

        • Ive been to brazil I know how it works. Public transport works fine but there needs to be money invested to make it great. Walking and biking across town or into the suburbs is not practical nor safe. Well the only way to fix traffic is to make wider roads or new cities.

        • Fruit Fly | Oct 8, 2012 at 10:15 pm |

          smaller cars would help traffic for sure just would not get rid of it completely . The space saved multiplied by thousands and millions would make a difference, plus smaller car accelerate much faster and also break much faster and that time difference multiplied by thousands or millions would make a difference. Don’t worry I ponder this stuff, but I still can’t find the a good reason for constant tracking, its just fishy. Bad government bad. 

        • Fruit Fly | Oct 8, 2012 at 10:15 pm |

          smaller cars would help traffic for sure just would not get rid of it completely . The space saved multiplied by thousands and millions would make a difference, plus smaller car accelerate much faster and also break much faster and that time difference multiplied by thousands or millions would make a difference. Don’t worry I ponder this stuff, but I still can’t find the a good reason for constant tracking, its just fishy. Bad government bad. 

      • Progress,TheMyth | Oct 8, 2012 at 7:29 pm |

        Conceptions of going “forwards” or “backwards” are the way idiots think of the world around them.

      • Progress,TheMyth | Oct 8, 2012 at 7:29 pm |

        Conceptions of going “forwards” or “backwards” are the way idiots think of the world around them.

        • Try walking a few miles to work everyday and then you can call me an idiot you useless troll. 

        • Try walking a few miles to work everyday and then you can call me an idiot you useless troll. 

        • First of all I am talking backwards on the timeline of inventions which to most humans follows a straight timeline, so dont take that shit out of context. Bikes and Foot are not going to fix anything you hippie.  Something better, new needs to come into the works and there are better alternatives out there that will replace the internal combustion engine in the future but the technology is not widespread yet due to numerous factors but their time will come. Only idiots call others idiots. 

        • First of all I am talking backwards on the timeline of inventions which to most humans follows a straight timeline, so dont take that shit out of context. Bikes and Foot are not going to fix anything you hippie.  Something better, new needs to come into the works and there are better alternatives out there that will replace the internal combustion engine in the future but the technology is not widespread yet due to numerous factors but their time will come. Only idiots call others idiots. 

    • Matt Staggs | Oct 8, 2012 at 4:24 pm |

      Biking and walking where and when it is safe is a great idea that I fully support. Sadly, much of America isn’t  designed with walking or biking in mind. It can be quite hazardous, or at the very least, difficult. My area is the very definition of “sprawl”, sadly. The good news is that there is an effort in some areas (budgets pending, of course) to create new trails and sidewalks to accommodate bicyclists and walkers, but it’s still a long way from truly walkable communities. All of this may change if oil becomes scarce or non-existent, but that will offer its own hardships that could make these prior concerns of little importance in comparison.

      • Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 5:32 pm |

        The oil, always the oil. It reminds me… the situation here is even more fucked up since the oil and automobile lobby managed to dismantle a huge part of our railroad system in the 60’s and 70’s, helped by the military-dictatorship-CIA-sponsored government. Now the present government is trying to re-establish a 19th century (but still energy efficient) tecnology in the 21th century, yet against the will of car/truck factories.

      • Rômulo Vieira | Oct 8, 2012 at 5:32 pm |

        The oil, always the oil. It reminds me… the situation here is even more fucked up since the oil and automobile lobby managed to dismantle a huge part of our railroad system in the 60’s and 70’s, helped by the military-dictatorship-CIA-sponsored government. Now the present government is trying to re-establish a 19th century (but still energy efficient) tecnology in the 21th century, yet against the will of car/truck factories.

      • Try walking with a bad knee or try moving 3-4 kids around to their various activities without automation, its just not practical, we would be going back to horseback if anything but walking and cycling long distances is the work of athletes not the general population.I guarantee you that when the oil finally goes dry there will still be cars around and not the dark ages unless we are decimated by war or some other cathasthrophe.

  3. Wont work | Oct 8, 2012 at 3:18 pm |

    In related news, a black market for fake RFID transmitters is born.

  4. Wont work | Oct 8, 2012 at 3:18 pm |

    In related news, a black market for fake RFID transmitters is born.

  5. alizardx | Oct 8, 2012 at 4:28 pm |

    “The administration claims that this system will be “confidential and secure” because its contractors will sign confidentiality agreements.” – nice to see a government with a sense of humor. Whatever security exists will be hacked and the vulns and exploits will posted long before the system is deployed. While the civil liberties implications with respect to intent are obvious, imagine a $100 transponder with a couple of hundred perfectly valid IDs for sale on the black market. IOW, only law-abiding citizens will get hammered.

  6. alizardx | Oct 8, 2012 at 4:28 pm |

    “The administration claims that this system will be “confidential and secure” because its contractors will sign confidentiality agreements.” – nice to see a government with a sense of humor. Whatever security exists will be hacked and the vulns and exploits will posted long before the system is deployed. While the civil liberties implications with respect to intent are obvious, imagine a $100 transponder with a couple of hundred perfectly valid IDs for sale on the black market. IOW, only law-abiding citizens will get hammered.

  7. in the US it’s known as Telematic services: OnStar, EazyPass et al
    most major trucking companies use it too
    but if you have a cellphone
    you have a tracking device with you

  8. in the US it’s known as Telematic services: OnStar, EazyPass et al
    most major trucking companies use it too
    but if you have a cellphone
    you have a tracking device with you

  9. “confidentiality agreements.”?  Yeah, right!  You know that private information won’t stay private.  Hackers [the bad ones] will get their hands on it.

    Say good-bye to privacy Brazil!

  10. “confidentiality agreements.”?  Yeah, right!  You know that private information won’t stay private.  Hackers [the bad ones] will get their hands on it.

    Say good-bye to privacy Brazil!

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