Goatman Sightings In Several States

Bigfoot has been hogging the spotlight of late, leading to a sad neglect of other cryptids we should be searching for, including the goat man, who has been spotted in various locales across the United States. Before It’s News explains:

The Goat man is a hominid cryptid most commonly associated with Louisiana, Maryland and Texas. It is described as a hybrid creature; part man and part goat. The urban legends often tell of it killing young lusting couples in parked cars or scouring neighborhoods killing family pets. There are also tales of them breaking into people’s houses and usually the raping of its victims. Most goat men are reported to make high-pitched squealing noises when agitated. Goat men have also been reported in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, and Michigan.

Numerous sightings in July 1969 led to the belief of a half-man, half-goat creature living in Lake Worth in Texas. Terry Deckard, a reporter, wrote an article about it in the newspaper, which made the front page. The headline read: “Fishy Man-Goat Terrifies Couples Parked at Lake Worth.” The couples that reported the sightings described it as a half-man, half-goat, with fur and scales. The following night, reports came in of the creature hurling a tire from a bluff at overlooking bystanders, which was reportedly witnessed by up to 10 individuals.

According to author Mark Opsasnick in a Washington Post interview, “There were basically three aspects to the Goatman legend [in Maryland], as described by early newspaper accounts. Number one is that they described a creature that was half-man, half-animal, walking on two feet. The other aspect of the legend was that it was a mad scientist — a scientist who worked in the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center who was experimenting on goats, and the experiment went astray, and he started attacking cars with an ax. [He’d attack] anyone who would roam the back roads of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. The third aspect of the legend was that it was just an old hermit who retreated to the woods and would be seen walking alone at night along Fletchertown Road, and when anyone would come around, he’d just run away.”

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  • http://www.facebook.com/eric.fischer.73 Eric Fischer

    “Goatboy is here to please you!”

    “how?”

    Evil laughter: “hohohoho” “Tie me to your headboard. Throw your legs over my shoulders and let me wear you like a feedbag”

    *Sexual noises*

    “aaaaaaaah”

    “hold on to my horns.”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpEy-LYo3vg

  • Hadrian999

    flashing back to the SNL skits

  • zombieslapper

    My most recent ‘shroom trip had me seeing a Goat-man, among other oddities.

    • Monkey See Monkey Do

      It was probably Pan.

  • “Big” Richard Johnson

    Beware of drunken satyrs.

  • BuzzCoastin

    > The Goat man is a hominid cryptid most commonly associated with Louisiana, Maryland and Texas.

    Maryland does have a hillbillyesque quality that is not widely known.
    However, everyone knows Goatman has been Governor of Louisiana for decades.

  • Calypso_1

    Who doesn’t run around in the woods at night wearing a goat head?

    • http://www.facebook.com/eric.fischer.73 Eric Fischer

      I personally prefer a bear’s head, but to each their own.

      • Calypso_1

        I like the way randy goat musk drips down their beards.

  • Anne Funke

    Can we please get back to level minded discussions about how Cheney and the other Republicans are responsible for the biggest con in world history, how they perpetrated the most heinous terrorist attack in history, and bought off all co-conspirators with monies through Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae?

    • Matt Staggs

      infowars.com is that way ->. Ask Goatman or Bigfoot nicely and they may lead you out of the labyrinth.

  • http://twitter.com/elphud Pfad Rhamses XV

    Funny. Satyrs have been spotted for millennia and written about. A spirit of the wild may present itself when threatened. Although it can do nothing in the material world.

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