They’ve Found Genghis Khan’s Tomb…Maybe

Picture: Portrait of Genghis Khan, anonymosu court painter (PD)

A team of American and Mongolian scholars may have discovered the final resting place of one of history’s greatest warriors, Genghis Khan. The discovery, if confirmed to be true, could prove to be problematic for a variety of reasons. Khan is still revered in Mongolia, and disturbing his tomb in the name of science would upset many Mongolians. The Chinese government fear that the site could be a touchstone for troublesome political action.

Via Daily Beast:

Altan Khuyag, a 53-year-old herder and forest ranger, offers us a cup of warm milky tea, insisting that we stay the night, in a typical display of Mongol friendliness. Among the nomads, reciprocal hospitality is a vital part of life on the steppe. When I ask about Genghis, he dips his ring finger into a bowl of vodka, flicking a drop to the sky, towards Tengri, the god of the blue heaven. Two more dips, two more flicks, two more ritual offerings. In Mongolia, superstition still surrounds Genghis Khan, and the hunt for his tomb often stirs heated debate. Even his name is a touchy subject. In Mongolia, Genghis Khan is known as Chinggis Khaan and is considered by many almost a god.

“He watches over us. He is why we have our good lives today,” says Khuyag, hunching his shoulders as if feeling the presence from above. He, like many locals, thinks Genghis Khan is buried on a mountain in the Khentii range—a belief shared by both ancient and contemporary historians but unsupported by science or physical evidence until the discoveries made by Lin and his Mongolian partners.

Khuyag has scaled the range twice, but he believes the conqueror’s grave should be left in peace. “I don’t think people should search for his tomb, because if it is opened, the world will end.”

Keep reading.

, , ,

  • mihail.ya.mihail@yandex.ru

    Unfortunately, in the official history there are many pro-Chinese falsifications about the “wild nomads”, “incredible cruelty of nomadic mongol-tatar conquerors”, and about “a war between the Tatars and Genghis Khan” etc.

    So probably not there looking for the tomb of Genghis Khan – that’s it, and cannot find it.
    Very most likely, it is in other part of Eurasia. Like most of the descendants
    of Genghis Khan and his native nation, living now among the Bashkirs, Kazakhs, Tatars, Uighurs and other Turkic peoples. Read a book “Forgotten Heritage of Tatars” (by Galy Yenikeyev) about the hidden real history of Tatars and their fraternal Turkic peoples. This e-book you can easily find on Smashwords company website: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/175211

    There are a lot of previously little-known historical facts, as well as 16 maps and illustrations in this book.

    On the cover of this book you can see the true appearance of Genghis Khan. It is his lifetime
    portrait.

    Notes to the portrait from the book says: “…In the ancient Tatar historical source «About the clan of Genghis-Khan» the author gives the words of the mother of Genghis-Khan: «My son Genghis looks like this: he has a golden bushy beard, he wears a white fur coat and goes on a white horse» [34, p. 14]. As we can see, the portrait of an unknown medieval artist in many ways corresponds to the words of
    the mother of the Hero, which have come down to us in this ancient Tatar story.
    Therefore, this portrait, which corresponds to the information of the Tatar source and to data from other sources, we believe, the most reliably transmits the appearance of Genghis-Khan…”.

21
More in Archaeology, Asia, China
Engraved Stone Discovered in China May Suggest Complex Language Existed 30,000 Years Ago

An artifact unearthed in north China may suggest that complex language systems may have existed in the area as early as 30,000 years ago. The item is a stone engraved...

Close