Legal Bullying: Bridgeport, CT Police Taser and then Kick Defenseless Man

I hope all of the officers who assaulted this man face the stiffest penalty available for such brazen aggression and cowardice.

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  • lazy_friend

    Wow. Kicks like that when someone is down can kill.

    • Calypso_1

      and in many jurisdictions be considered use of deadly force. It can turn a battery charge into attempted murder.

      • Monkey See Monkey Do

        Not if your a cop.

  • emperorreagan

    The stiffest penalty available for a cop? So 2 weeks administrative leave with pay followed by a denial of wrongdoing?

    • Apathesis

      Maybe even a promotion down the road…

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

    When the police realize they’ve already lost their pensions, we’ll see the violence go a little bit further up the food chain.

    • http://www.facebook.com/eric.fischer.73 Eric Fischer

      That’s not gonna happen. They can just put it on the saves’ tab indefinitely.
      One of Machiavelli’s primary points in “The Prince,” keep your army happy.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

        Yeah, that may have been possible in 16th century Italy, with a scant population and expanding imperialism, but last time I checked they don’t have any colonies on Mars. They’ve succeeded in raping the Entire Earth, and growth is now done. That can’t be hidden forever. The fact that you and I both know that there are serious problems with the financial system and can talk about it over the interwebs should speak volumes about what’s slowly (and agonizingly) unfolding before our eyes. Money is trust; fiat currency is money, plus violence-dervied legitimacy. When the trust part collapses, the only thing remaining is the violent part, and there’s more of us than them. Just a matter of time. “To the mind that is still, the universe surrenders.” Lao Tzu

        • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

          So what is your argument? Is it that all economic growth is based on resource extraction, such as oil, coal and gas, and that that’s peaked and now growth is over?

          What if its true, that our world economy has been based on a premise of perpetual Growth, and that growth has been based largely on unsustainable exploitation of resources. Is that to say that growth can ONLY be based on unsustainable extraction of resources? Is there absolutely no money in creating wealth? I.e. creating things of real value, that improve quality of life for everyone?

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            What about this kind of growth?

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBLZmwlPa8A

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

            That looks like a brilliant documentary. Thanks. I’ll watch it tomorrow night. As for the kind of growth permaculture encourages, that’s apples and oranges to the kind of growth that is done now. The most highly rated Youtube comment lauds a quote in the film at 38:43 (I skipped to that part to give it a listen) that just reinforces the point that this kind of ‘growth’ (I hate to use semi-quotes there) in permaculture just can’t be compared to the kind of GDP (money/debt) growth that is finished. I just wish I could whip up some debt strike fever to force the banks into submission, so we can collectively regain our autonomy/consciousness and start permaculture growing. (I am experimenting with permaculture practices on my 4-acre small hold here in Eastern Ontario).

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            That’s cool. I did permaculture this past summer for room and board, in the Adirondacks.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

            OK. That’s a can of worms, but I’ll try to be brief. Growth (expansion of arable land, development of technology, general bettering of living conditions) of our species, like any natural system, is made possible through energy. The flow rate of a major portion of our species’ energy stock (oil) seems to be in decline or presently will be. By way of its convenient chemical properties, this particular type of energy stock also accounts for 90% of the fuel stock for mechanized travel. In our current vulnerable social system, where every economic transaction that utilizes interest-bearing debt-based fiat currency as a medium avails a portion to be systemically harvested by commercial and central banks, growth is a mandatory part of participating in society. This is so, because said banks are always on our heels to turn a profit or lose what we own via what we owe to them. However, the system is bound to fail, because the interest (usury) part is always accumulating and pushing society to go ever farther afield to acquire more wealth to convert into their currency to pay them back. That’s not sustainable on a finite planet. I’m not sure when this became the case (Bill Still argues in the Secret of Oz [youtube it] that it has been happening on and off in America since 1811), but the current political and economic system has remained stuck in this downward spiral for almost 100 years. We’re coming to a head pretty soon, though. That trust is beginning to erode is obvious, but the point of criticality is anyone’s guess; much like a volcano or earthquake. We’re just another natural system waiting for a punctuation point in our equilibrium. Good luck!

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            Yeah, I understand all that. Austrian school of economics, fractional reserve, fiat currency, Federal reserve creating money through debt, petro dollars, yada yada yada. I just think that its possible to tie money making into wealth creation. There is a long history of people doing just that. They have always done it alongside people making money through war, extortion, extraction etc. Since so many natural systems are degraded and since restoring them would create wealth. I think there could possibly be a new economy based on investing in the environment and making it more productive in a sustainable way. For example if you used permaculture principles to turn desert into productive farm land, this would create wealth. There are people around the World doing that. Its basically creating wealth through applied wisdom and knowledge.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

            Yeah. I get what you mean. I just don’t like the idea of wealth. The concept of accumulating wealth through development of arid land seems tied into the current mentality. It’s a notion that will be impossible to graft onto everyone–which is to say, I think we are heading towards a diversity of practices (must like permaculture teaches) across populations and geographic areas. People are going to be doing really different things to survive in different climates and terrains, and the ‘economy’ as a homogenous, identifiable entity won’t be discernible at that point. So the whole accumulating wealth (whether it be based off of growing food/building materials/fuel in nature or something else) won’t transfer easily across regions like it does now. Oil homogeneizes our practices so that the current ‘economy’ can be measured as a simple, universal practice of exchange, and wealth is a singular, universally-fungible idea that can be redeemed for anything at any point in the world. That global trust is eroding. That time is done, as I see it anyways. What’s next is a big world of spontaneity. I like it, and I think my kids will like it too; but, I’m not sure if most of the First World has the mental pliability for it. (You sure as hell seem like you do!)

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            I don’t necessarily mean accumulation. Wealth can mean a lot of things, for example, parks and attractive public spaces are wealth. Clean air and water is wealth. So yeah, it looks like we agree on a lot of things. Scandinavian Countries are wealthier than the US in terms of quality of life. RAW wrote about wealth in “Prometheus Rising” as being something that is created as people learn to use their brains better. I think he was quoting Karl Popper speaking about negative entropy.

            Yeah, I am looking forward to more diversity and spontaneity also. I think the current system is holding a lot of natural spontaneity and creativity back. So I don’t think it will be a Mad Max scenario. Looks like you don’t either. Thanks for sharing your thoughts

        • http://www.ContraControl.com/ Zenc

          “They’ve succeeded in raping the Entire Earth”

          I’d like to add that They haven’t just stolen nearly everything on the planet.

          No, that wasn’t enough for them.

          They have stolen all there is now and an amazing amount from “the Future”.

          National Debts and Derivatives/Futures Markets are where this theft from the future is accounted for. The numbers found there beggar belief.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

            Agreed. I’ve heard numbers anywhere between $700 trillion to $1 quadrillion being tossed around for the derivatives market alone. It’s so absurd that the guys on the inside who see these numbers must not give a fuck…total nihilists. They’re just passing around this flaming bag of dog shit hoping they aren’t going to be the one that catches nothing but hot squish as the bag makes its rounds.

        • http://www.facebook.com/eric.fischer.73 Eric Fischer

          Oh they haven’t finished with the Earth by a long shot. There’s still the Arctic, much of Africa, and plenty of open space still in North and South America just waiting to be “developed.”

          Then there’s the fact that, with exponentially developing surveillance technologies, the job can be down with ever fewer bodies. When Jay Gould said “I can always hire one half of the poor to kill the other half,” they couldn’t even dream of the methods and tool that exist today. Every populist uprising in history had the common element of a surplus of young disenfranchised males, who today are the most likely to be imprisoned or otherwise snared in the criminal “justice” system.

          And while We may be able to freely talk about the systemic problems freely on the interwebs, that just tells me that doing so is no threat whatsoever to the power structure; it hasn’t been called by terms such as “web” and “net” for nothing.

          Now while printing money to pay the goon squads, among other things, can cause massive inflation; so what? Sure many people will go hungry and some of the poorest will go through life half starved and without medical care of any kind. Average life expectancy will decrease. But why should the rulers care as long as their bodyguards are content? The only economic factor that could threaten their power would be if the cost of fuel got so high that no one would be in the business of transporting consumer goods where they need to go, and you can always subsidize that.

          I hope I’m wrong, but I see no reason why the current power structure won’t be able to maintain its grip for centuries to come.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=742104313 Adam Goodwin

            I understand your pessimism, and I identify with it. It’s interesting that near the end of your post you mention that the only economic factor that threaten the rulers is an interruption in the supply chain by high fuel prices, because that’s exactly what we’re facing. The supply chain is dependent on credit to function smoothly. So in the most practical sense freighters that don’t have signed bills of lading don’t leave port. Read the FEASTA report Trade-Off…that’s always bedtime reading that gives me nightmares. http://www.feasta.org/2012/06/17/trade-off-financial-system-supply-chain-cross-contagion-a-study-in-global-systemic-collapse/

  • “Big” Richard Johnson

    How dare they beat a white person!

    • Andrew

      Racist.

      • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

        Are you playing along on his use of irony or are you missing his irony?

      • Matt Staggs

        Sarcasm detector needs recalibration.

    • TennesseeCyberian

      I personally found it refreshing to watch the portly black officer lumber up to whitey and get a good head kick in. At first I thought he was coming to put a stop to the needless violence, but soon my disappointment became sheer joy.

      Is it racist for a black cop to kick an immobilized white suspect? Or just good clean fun?

  • Apathesis

    http://leaksource.wordpress.com/2013/01/29/3-bridgeport-ct-cops-caught-on-video-beating-stun-gunned-man/

    Video was recorded in 2011. How can cops get away with STOMPING on a prone & handcuffed individual? Gotta love corrupt police unions.

  • BuzzCoastin

    give a fat moron a gun & a title and this stuff soon follows

    • moremisinformation

      Don’t forget a nice costume.

  • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

    what if these guys became cops just so they can do stuff like this? What if that was why most people become cops?

    • symbiont

      you ask an aweful lot of questions lol

  • Apathesis

    At what point does it become acceptable to attack people officers who act in this manner, and what level of force is justifiable?

    • Noah_Nine

      i don’t think people ever get away with it…

  • Noah_Nine

    …dude must’ve been mouthin’ off…. in my experience pigs don’t like that…

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