Graham Hancock Announces Sequel to ‘Fingerprints of the Gods’

Picture: Cpt. Muji (CC)

Good news for fans of alternative history writer Graham Hancock: The author has announced a sequel to his 1995 book Fingerprints of the Gods. As yet, the book has no title, but details can be found on his official Facebook page. Here’s an excerpt:

Emerging from mainstream science – which has so often ridiculed and dismissed my work – the first piece of evidence that made me realise there was a new story to be told was proof that north America was struck by several pieces of a giant fragmenting comet 12,900 years ago (i.e. 10,900 BC), causing an extinction-level event all around the planet, radically changing global climate and initiating the sudden and hitherto unexplained thousand-year deep-freeze right at the end of the Ice Age that geologists call the Younger Dryas.

The second early clue was the discovery in Turkey of an extraordinary 12,000-year old megalithic site called Gobekli Tepe, which is on the scale of Stonehenge but 7,000 years older than any of the other great stone circles known to history anywhere else in the world. Furthermore the best megalithic work at Gobekli Tepi is the oldest and the site was deliberately buried 10,000 years ago only to be rediscovered, and to have its importance and mysterious nature recognised long after the publication of Fingerprints of the Gods.

Keep reading here.

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  • lazy_friend

    First book on alternative history that I got a chance to read. My mom didn’t want me to buy it, so of course I went there and bought it. It was a pretty nice initiation.

    • symbiont

      Hahahhhh,thats always the sign

  • echar

    This is good news. I am excited to read it once it is available.

  • symbiont

    Graham Hancock is such a genuine guy and his books are always fascinating and very logically thought out. I only got into his work after reading tony wrights book left in the dark, and realizing how much sense all of hancocks research makes in light of this. They both compliment each other perfectly and almost don’t make sense without the other.

    • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

      “and almost don’t make sense without the other.” I think that’s a bit of a stretch.

      Hancock is a way better writer. Way better at logically arguing is points.

      • symbiont

        I’m not sure what point there is even responding to you but your comment is too ironic to ignore. I’ve seen you resort to arrogantly trolling posts about Wright’s work, since your obviously too dim-witted to come up with any logical refutations of his theory yourself. You then resort to shit-brained illogical arguments and anecdotal evidence…Then later even posted an ego-maniacal rant about how amazing you are, shirt-less pictures included. LOL

        • symbiont

          Hancock frequently refers to humans as a species with amnesia btw

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            Have you been awake for 200 days straight or something? You sound irritable.

          • Calypso_1

            Indeed let us visit those memorable times lest we forget.

            Flout your man meat so the mockery may come to full fruition.

            My beard awaits in hoary splendor o milk maid of the pontic steppes.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            In retrospect I can see how posting a picture of myself flexing my muscles might have come off as douchey, but anyway, in another context, I think it could be inspiring for some to see the results of what an active outdoor lifestyle, and an organic omnivorous diet can do for a 41 year old body.

            I can see why fruitarians wouldn’t want to do the same, though. Maybe its their sophistication, maybe its because the look like anemic homunculae. Opinions differ.

          • Calypso_1

            Anemic homunculae I like that!

            Always in search of new visions of the pain within.

            The darkness needs companionship in such strange ways.

          • Calypso_1

            Indeed let us visit those memorable times lest we forget.

            Flout your man meat so the mockery may come to full fruition.

            My beard awaits in hoary splendor o milk maid of the pontic steppes.

    • Kevin Leonard

      I have never read Tony Wright.
      Yet, Graham Hancock makes perfect sense to me.

    • Kevin Leonard

      I have never read Tony Wright.
      Yet, Graham Hancock makes perfect sense to me.

      • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

        to summarize Wright basically:

        we should eat fruit and live in the trees
        because that is where we were when we became human(doubtful)
        it will make us smarter and less aggro.
        the right brain is all you need
        left brain is evil

        one of the problems i see is that chimps live in trees and eat mostly fruit and their brains are 1/3 the size of ours plus they are wicked aggro

        • symbiont

          Sorry, but thats completely incorrect. Once again, you’ve done nothing but display how completely fucking ignorant and flat out oblivious you are.

          • Kevin Leonard

            Could you provide your own summary? and how, exactly he relates to Hancock?
            I perused the wiki on Wright and didn’t get much more than what Ted said (though with less sass, ;-)

            I can certainly argue on the side of promoting any practices which support creative thought processes. It is certainly something that is lacking in most facets of our culture, starting with the education system. But a “species amnesia” can be much more than simply a dominance of left-brained thinking imposed on the masses. And my impressions of Hancock is that he uses the phrase to refer to the gap in recorded history back to the truly ancient civilizations that are evident through his work.

            My first take on reading the wiki on Wright was that he is essentially referring to what Wilber would call “pre-personal” consciousness evolving to a “personal” consciousness, which would ultimately evolve to a trans-personal consciousness. And I would argue that shedding many, if not most, of the modern cultural “sophistications” (read: traps) is fundamental to moving in that direction.

            Is this on the same track? or please give me a pitch. I’m trying to decide if I want to read more.

          • Kevin Leonard

            Could you provide your own summary? and how, exactly he relates to Hancock?
            I perused the wiki on Wright and didn’t get much more than what Ted said (though with less sass, ;-)

            I can certainly argue on the side of promoting any practices which support creative thought processes. It is certainly something that is lacking in most facets of our culture, starting with the education system. But a “species amnesia” can be much more than simply a dominance of left-brained thinking imposed on the masses. And my impressions of Hancock is that he uses the phrase to refer to the gap in recorded history back to the truly ancient civilizations that are evident through his work.

            My first take on reading the wiki on Wright was that he is essentially referring to what Wilber would call “pre-personal” consciousness evolving to a “personal” consciousness, which would ultimately evolve to a trans-personal consciousness. And I would argue that shedding many, if not most, of the modern cultural “sophistications” (read: traps) is fundamental to moving in that direction.

            Is this on the same track? or please give me a pitch. I’m trying to decide if I want to read more.

          • symbiont

            Its pretty different than that. Its hard to break down into a headline but basically him and many other researchers are concluding that the human brain no longer fully develops. It looks at what the brain was built and fueled by for tens of millions of years (an unimaginably complex cocktail of plant hormones and DNA-transcripting biochemistry) and how this influenced its development. It then goes into how loosing this ever more entangled symbiotic relationship with the forest resulted in a reversion back to a more typical mammallian brain.

            Some stuff i found written by others online “If you change the materials you use to build and fuel any of our material technologies then the functionality of that thing will obviously change. Katherine Milton has found that the brains build materials and fuel now contain only 5% of the things that were constantly present, 24/7, in high amounts, for tens of millions of years in the african rainforests.

            The brain is the most complex and chemically sensitive thing in the known universe- so do we really think it will still develop and function as it did without hardly any of its most basic requirements? Apply this basic engineering logic to a car and it is obvious, but for some reason we never apply it to ourselves- that place where all these contradictions flow together.

            Obviously, if we truly are deluded on a physiological level then there will be no lack of evidence or behavioral/psychological symtpoms….But as with any case of delusion or dementia, there will be humungus difficulty in perceptually recognizing the problem even when its staring us in the face, and psychological difficulties accepting the diagnosis.”

            Heres the free book and links to his sites: http://leftinthedark.org.uk/sites/default/files/Left%20in%20the%20Dark%20free%20edition.pdf

            Theres also lots of interviews with him on youtube.

          • Kevin Leonard

            Thanks for the link. I also did a quick search on disinfo and found the long interview (now cued for viewing) with all of the comments and Ted’s audition pose for the Men of the Paleo Diet Calendar. Nice Ted.

          • Kevin Leonard

            Thanks for the link. I also did a quick search on disinfo and found the long interview (now cued for viewing) with all of the comments and Ted’s audition pose for the Men of the Paleo Diet Calendar. Nice Ted.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            I do what I can.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            yeah, our brains were bigger back when we ate mammoth meat back in the Pleistocene and women had bigger tits and asses. (just going by the art of the era) So that’s why I eat a lot of red meat. Eating a fruit diet is a good way to develop diabetes.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            That means a lot to me coming from a guy that eats eats bananas all day and spends all his time on the toilet.

        • lazy_friend

          Bonobos (pygmy chimps) are not so aggro, and it’s because they have more food to go around than the common chimp, which lives across the river from them. Their behavior has adapted overtime to such abundance of resources. I’ve dealt with Wrights work and it makes sense to a point, before becoming extreme on the fruit intake. In my opinion, a balanced diet is best, and a lot of people need to up their fruit intake to get the vitamins, minerals and a little energy boost from natures candy. But I would not go just on fruits without acclimating the body first, and I’ve heard it can take up to 8 years to do that. I don’t like extreme views on diets, too much to one end of the spectrum to the other is incorrect for most in my opinion. Now the split brain physiology has been observed by many other writers and researchers, I am still studying it and can’t really debate on it yet.

          • symbiont

            Interesting, do you have any links for the 8 years thing? I know many who’ve transitioned in much less than half that time with no negative results but its always interesting to read info on this, since for some it can indeed take quite a while

          • lazy_friend

            Yeah I have link somewhere, I’ll look for it, it’s anecdote from a fruitarian, not with any scientific method behind it. But remember, I said “it can take” not that it will be the same for everyone. ok found it, http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/01/29/steve-jobs-fruitarian-diet-lands-ashton-kutcher-in-the-hospital/ it’s in the comments section of the article. Also I said I dealt with Wrights work and even bought the book instead of just taking the free version. It all makes great sense, but I just can’t go on fruit alone at this point in my life, maybe at an advanced age. For now I need the dense caloric fuel and the psychological comfort a juice steak brings, but I also find it important to have a constant fruit intake coupled with the rest of my diet.

          • symbiont

            Thanks. Yeah Tony definitely does not recommend everyone to just drop everything and eat a high % of fruit. He himself doesn’t eat 100% fruit if i recall correctly. We don’t know for sure what we ate exactly but the physiological argument outlined in the book makes a strong case for a high % fruit diet. The problem is, if the theory is true, then our ability to assimilate nutrients through digestion is but a dim shadow of what it was before, not to mention the problems a lot of standard american type diets bring into the picture.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            Tony Wright is a gentleman and a scholar!

            fixed!

          • Calypso_1

            and the intransigent idiocy in which you abide should serve as an inspiration? The previous episode of exhibitionist titillation alone should have informed you of the course this continued stance would provoke. and as I recall your own declaration was an ability to survive on cigars & sausages while excreting grade-A humanure.

            You are too intelligent of a man to proceed with this refrain of such an ignominious display. Pinch it off & have a beer dude.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            Fruit has been selectively bred over the years to have a higher fructose content. Hunter gatherers in Europe and the Northern Lattitudes ate berries, seasonally and things like rose hips, not tropical fruits all year long.

            In Chinese Medicine, you need warming foods in a cold area, not cooling foods. There is a lot of tradition behind this. This eating of tropical fruit all year long(probably shipped in from all around the globe using fossil fuels) while living in New Jersey, is only somthing that could happen in modern times.

            If you want to connect more with the earth, try eating the foods in your local area that indigenous people lived on. You will eand up eating different foods depending on the season and will be much happier and grounded and adapted to your bio-region.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            well, in all seriousness, they are still have way smaller brains than a person. Symboiont wants to get all nasty about it without being rational, but you seem sincere, so I will just say There is way more evidence our brains developed through hunting on the Savannah.

            I don’t think it something to simply gloss over as to why chimps AND bonobos have smaller brains than modern humans if fruit is brain food. I’m all for people coming up with novel theories, but his stuff just isn’t well researched or written.

          • lazy_friend

            Its not the size of their brains that I am concerned with, that’s besides the point and has to do with many factors, like their general DNA makeup and that they are from a different species etc etc. Blue whales have huge brains and I don’t see them inventing smart phones, or spilling philosophy it all depends on the ratio to body size as well. I am more concerned with the health of their brains. We developed in the Savanah most likely due to the fact that we needed to outsmart the animals we were hunting. Fruits are healthy, that is obvious for anyone to see and so is a l bit of meat if not taken overboard. The humans of the Savanah who run just on meat also do not have a highly developed culture and look kinda fugly even if they score high on general health due to their constant exercise regimen. My point is that a balanced diet is best for humans, which includes fruits. We don’t know what causes animals to evolve big brains. Eating what is found locally is good for logistics, I agree with that, but saying its the ideal diet is a bit simplistic in regards to how complex nutrition and the human body are. I want what the pro athletes are eating, they are doing it right from what I see. Athletes eat a balanced diet. If anything, I would go for the paleo diet (which includes fruits) but I would tweak it to include some carbs when I am recovering from physical activity, as you need to get your blood sugar up after burning it for energy during demanding activities. Simple carbs have a high glycemic index and are easy to digest, while most fruits have a moderate to low glycemic index even if they are sweet. Glucose is the type of sugar in the blood and the faster the sugar in the food you eat gets to the blood is how the glycemic index is determined. If it’s a different type of sugar, the bodys catabolic process has to occur first, if the sugar is not glucose and harder to digest, that means it will have a lower glycemic index raising blood sugar at a moderate rate . Eating high GI foods is what causes diebetes, because it strains the pancreas from activating it all the time to release insulin, creating problems there, and creates insulin resistance at the cells creating problems as well at that scale. This is my last post on this, you white devils can argue more if you want. Good day. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycemic_index

          • lazy_friend

            Its not the size of their brains that I am concerned with, that’s besides the point and has to do with many factors, like their general DNA makeup and that they are from a different species etc etc. Blue whales have huge brains and I don’t see them inventing smart phones, or spilling philosophy it all depends on the ratio to body size as well. I am more concerned with the health of their brains. We developed in the Savanah most likely due to the fact that we needed to outsmart the animals we were hunting. Fruits are healthy, that is obvious for anyone to see and so is a l bit of meat if not taken overboard. The humans of the Savanah who run just on meat also do not have a highly developed culture and look kinda fugly even if they score high on general health due to their constant exercise regimen. My point is that a balanced diet is best for humans, which includes fruits. We don’t know what causes animals to evolve big brains. Eating what is found locally is good for logistics, I agree with that, but saying its the ideal diet is a bit simplistic in regards to how complex nutrition and the human body are. I want what the pro athletes are eating, they are doing it right from what I see. Athletes eat a balanced diet. If anything, I would go for the paleo diet (which includes fruits) but I would tweak it to include some carbs when I am recovering from physical activity, as you need to get your blood sugar up after burning it for energy during demanding activities. Simple carbs have a high glycemic index and are easy to digest, while most fruits have a moderate to low glycemic index even if they are sweet. Glucose is the type of sugar in the blood and the faster the sugar in the food you eat gets to the blood is how the glycemic index is determined. If it’s a different type of sugar, the bodys catabolic process has to occur first, if the sugar is not glucose and harder to digest, that means it will have a lower glycemic index raising blood sugar at a moderate rate . Eating high GI foods is what causes diebetes, because it strains the pancreas from activating it all the time to release insulin, creating problems there, and creates insulin resistance at the cells creating problems as well at that scale. This is my last post on this, you white devils can argue more if you want. Good day. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycemic_index

          • Kevin Leonard

            I’m now advocating a diet composed entirely of krill.

          • Kevin Leonard

            I’m now advocating a diet composed entirely of krill.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            Or maybe a Giant squid diet..

          • Calypso_1

            Squid is magnificant & provides such great culinary knife play.

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            but alas it “has a face” and thus leads to brain damage…

          • Calypso_1

            Come now, what savant doesn’t enjoy a nice buccinator brochette?

          • Calypso_1

            Come now, what savant doesn’t enjoy a nice buccinator brochette?

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            MMMM!

          • http://twitter.com/TedHeistman Ted Heistman

            MMMM!

  • http://www.sacredgeometryinternational.com/ Camron Wiltshire

    Very excited to see what Graham has in store for the World. I hope some of the recent discoveries by fellow alternative historian and independent scholar Randall Carlson might be included :) Our perception of history will again be permanently altered by these upcoming revelations.

  • smooth_operator

    Good. I love Hancock’s well-researched, analytical writings and I think the majority of his energy should be spent in this area. His works of fiction don’t even come close to his research-based material.

  • Antediluviancurrent

    Hancock has always initiated radical changes in my own personal life with his books. So this new release is a definite sign for me that I’m going to go through a new transformation then, haha.
    He turns me from skeptic apathy to a certain set of ideas, to a sudden engagement/experimentation with it. Hancock turned me to the wonders of history at the age of 10 or so, leading me to actually studying it and making my career out of the discipline. I closed high school with a paper dealing with the Templars, mostly using his book on the Arc of the Covenant. And at the age of 19, starting with studying history, I got hooked on his book Supernatural. That year I experimented the hell out of psychedelics and I’ve never been the same again. He always knows how to convince me and thus alter my life.
    Even if you disagree with him, you gotta give it to this man, he turns people ( not only me, but many others as I’ve heard from personal experience ) onto fields in existence they haven’t considered before. We need people like this.

  • Mombasa69

    Nice one, Graham, will look forward to it, you’ve been a little side-tracked for the last few years.

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