More Than 50 Countries Collaborated With CIA On Extraordinary Rendition Torture Program

Torturing: it brought the United States together with Iran, Syria, Libya, and Zimbabwe. Wired reports:

A new report from the Open Society Foundation details the CIA’s effort to outsource torture since 9/11. Known as “extraordinary rendition,” the practice concerns taking detainees to and from U.S. custody without a legal process and handing detainees over to countries that practiced torture.

The report found that 136 people went through the post-9/11 extraordinary rendition, and 54 countries were complicit in it. Some were official U.S. adversaries, like Iran and Syria, brought together with the CIA by the shared interest of combating terrorism.

The most famous case involves Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen snatched in 2002 by the U.S. at JFK Airport before the CIA sent him to Syria under the mistaken impression he was a terrorist. In Syrian custody, Arar was “imprisoned for more than ten months in a tiny grave-like cell, beaten with cables, and threatened with electric shocks by the Syrian government.”

The full 54 countries that aided in post-9/11 renditions: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Finland, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Libya, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Yemen, and Zimbabwe.

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  • Calypso_1

    Such a shame that the Glorious Leaders of the Free World lost a stellar opportunity to reach out and find rare common ground with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

    • BuzzCoastin

      I’d be surprised if the CIA didn’t have a North Korea operation
      seriously

      • Calypso_1

        I’d be surprised if North Korea itself wasn’t an op.

        Have you read ‘The Sword & the Abacus: The Japanese Penetration of Korea, 1895-1910′

        • BuzzCoastin

          nope, haven’t
          but reading some reviews at Amazon
          it reminded me that colonialism is only considered heinous
          when a non-Western country is the colonizer

          how would you connect the Japanese occupation with the CIA in the DPRK?

        • BuzzCoastin

          nope, haven’t
          but reading some reviews at Amazon
          it reminded me that colonialism is only considered heinous
          when a non-Western country is the colonizer

          how would you connect the Japanese occupation with the CIA in the DPRK?

          • Calypso_1

            http://www.academia.edu/692306/Internationalist_Culture_in_North_Korea_1945-1950

            this has some good perspectives on the jap/DPRK postwar relationship

            this on CIA involvement in postwar jap

            http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/09/world/cia-spent-millions-to-support-japanese-right-in-50-s-and-60-s.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

            the book i listed goes a great deal into japan’s views regarding Korea in relationship to russo-japanese dynamics.

            There is so much coming out on US reconstruction of postwar Japan. They ‘took over’ the Japanese colonial interests & dynamics. The geopolitics did not change.

            Japan had seen their ‘forced modernization’ of Korea as a necessary bulwark to protect themselves & all of asia against the west (incursions by france, US, russia). It was these endeavors that allowed them to reach the level of industrialization to fight their way into the ‘Civilized’ world of nation-states.

          • Calypso_1

            http://www.academia.edu/692306/Internationalist_Culture_in_North_Korea_1945-1950

            this has some good perspectives on the jap/DPRK postwar relationship

            this on CIA involvement in postwar jap

            http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/09/world/cia-spent-millions-to-support-japanese-right-in-50-s-and-60-s.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

            the book i listed goes a great deal into japan’s views regarding Korea in relationship to russo-japanese dynamics.

            There is so much coming out on US reconstruction of postwar Japan. They ‘took over’ the Japanese colonial interests & dynamics. The geopolitics did not change.

            Japan had seen their ‘forced modernization’ of Korea as a necessary bulwark to protect themselves & all of asia against the west (incursions by france, US, russia). It was these endeavors that allowed them to reach the level of industrialization to fight their way into the ‘Civilized’ world of nation-states.

          • BuzzCoastin

            They ‘took over’ the Japanese colonial interests & dynamics.
            The geopolitics did not change.

            that makes sense, however
            the Koreans are the proverbial Monkey in the Middle
            (Monkey {Sun Wukong} being the Chinese concept of disruption)
            the Koreans are closer to the Chinese in culture & sensibility
            and South Korea especially hates, hates, hates the Japanese
            so I see the Koreans milking this for all its worth
            but ultimately aligning with the Chinese interests

          • Calypso_1

            I don’t disagree with a thing you have said. My particular interest has been Korean collaborators with the Japanese…as with any collaborator the motives are murky at best, tending towards duplicity & more complex attempts at skullduggery. My opinions are not yet well formed. It’s a fascinating case study nonetheless.

            There are also ways to maneuver a man in the middle whose chief occupation exists in a chaffed milking of rival teats.

          • BuzzCoastin

            collaboration & self serving capitulation
            have long been viable tactics in Asia
            usually adopted as a tactic of last resort

            culturally the Amerikans are out of their league
            when it comes to intrigue and Machiavellian machinations
            at a high level
            Jiāng Zǐyá predates Machiavelli by ~1000 years
            and Edward Bernays knows jackshit about Asia

          • BuzzCoastin

            collaboration & self serving capitulation
            have long been viable tactics in Asia
            usually adopted as a tactic of last resort

            culturally the Amerikans are out of their league
            when it comes to intrigue and Machiavellian machinations
            at a high level
            Jiāng Zǐyá predates Machiavelli by ~1000 years
            and Edward Bernays knows jackshit about Asia

          • Calypso_1

            I don’t know about the review contents, but from my perspective it doesn’t paint the picture that way at all. It is a very rational, well written history and provides reasoned & multi-sided views for Japan’s course of actions & their desires to enter western-style imperialism. In fact the insights into imperialism as a system are fascinating when seen from an outside nation attempting to join the club for their own survival and benefit in the cold realization of the nature of powerful nations in the world around them.

          • BuzzCoastin

            yeah, I have to admit I’ve not considered Japan’s colonialism in that light before, and it makes sense, especially considering that a few hundred years prior they were isolationists & xenophobes

          • Calypso_1

            From my readings the Japanese leadership were initially content to allow the old order of Chinese supremacy to reign.
            It was only after discovering how weak China was in the face of western powers, esp. post-opium wars, & in conjunction with their own difficulties in managing renegotiations of unequal treaties did they decide the necessity of pursuing a course of imperial dominance in the Asian sphere.

          • BuzzCoastin

            that’s my understanding too
            plus China had not been in the empire building business
            since Kublai Khan and the annexation Tibet

            now Japan is merely a US Colony
            with very little room to maneuver on it’s own
            and isolated from the rest of Asia by their Nippon arrogance
            Oh & BTW:
            people of Chinese ancestry
            make up a significant proportion of all SE Asian countries

          • Calypso_1

            In response to your BTW: I had an anthro prof years ago who considered the chinese diaspora in SEA to be a strategy of soft imperialism that had facilitated chinese trade interests & helped to relocate ethnicities & families out of favor with the emperor for many centuries.

          • BuzzCoastin

            the phenomenon is known as “The Overseas Chinese” in China
            it’s a tradition that goes back thousands of years, not a conscious stratagem
            once Chinese always Chinese is the underlying idea
            almost all Overseas Chinese keep ties with their family in China
            but personal interests always prevail over national interests
            old proverb
            Kingdoms come & go, but Family is forever
            Overseas Chinese are the entrepreneurial class of China
            for example:
            I know a Chinese couple, he was born in Japan, she was born in Thailand
            both came from successful Overseas Chinese families
            they both returned to China after the revolution
            both still have family connections in Japan & Thailand

        • BuzzCoastin

          Oh & when I eat in DPRK restaurants in Beijing
          I always pass myself off as something other than American
          on the other hand
          I’ve had quite a few breakfasts with CIA contractors in Cambodia
          where US dollars spew from cash machines
          & Cambodian money is used instead of coins

        • BuzzCoastin

          Is the DPRK a CIA client state?
          yeah, probably
          Is the DPRK a PRC client state?
          yeah, probably
          Is the DPRK run by a bunch of self-serving crooks like America?
          yeah, probably

  • Raz

    Who is in Hong Kong that the US wants “arrest”?

  • Raz

    Who is in Hong Kong that the US wants “arrest”?

    • Ittabena

      A friend of mine’s father who had to leave Hawaii because because he got caught ripping off the US in a Medical Supply scam. He is banished to Hong Kong now. Don’t know if he can even return to his Philippine homeland or not. But that’s the only one I know of…

    • BuzzCoastin

      the countries listed helped with CIA torture prisons
      Hong Kong, supposedly under PRC control
      has long been under the control of the US/UK
      (MegaUpload servers were seized in Hong Kong by the FBI)
      the fact that the FBI & CIA can operate freely in Hong Kong
      shows the PRC has only nominal control of the island

  • Ittabena

    Well this adds a whole new dimension to the motto “Coalition of the Willing” doesn’t it?

  • BuzzCoastin

    notable by their absence from the list
    Israel, France, Japan, Singapore, Cambodia, Vietnam, Burma
    in fact, it would be easier to list those not on the payroll of the CIA