February 2013

The above video is a brilliant piece. In a sense it’s already very much of its time but this works as a reminder of the fast moving nature of the interbutts.

For me this video hammers home the fact we live in an era where the “New Media” is now outgrowing the old. You are unlikely to understand most of the references in it, if you’re not part of the internet’s growing subculture, and frankly that’s what I love about it.

Nick Margerrison (my twitter)

FURTHER VIDEOS HERE: RAP NEWS History is happening

I’ve been a fan of Krystle Cole for a while now. She’s well known for her numerous informational videos about psychedelics. Her website, Neurosoup.com, provides information for a broad spectrum of entheogens,…

If you’ve never seen the film Wild in the Streets, a lost classic of trashy hippie-sploitation, it’s well worth a viewing. Released in 1968, it envisions a dystopian near future in which counterculture-loving young people, fed up with the older generations, take over the government and rewrite the laws to center around youth and hedonism.

Under the new order, at age 35, all adults are permanently imprisoned in psychedelic re-education “mercy centers” where, as revolutionary leader Max Frost explains, “in groovy surroundings, we’re going to psyche ’em all out on LSD.” Is it a nightmare, or a future model for a humane and fun form of euthanasia?

Justin Gillis tries to unscramble the conspiracy culture surrounding climate change for the New York Times: When I first met the NASA climate researcher Gavin Schmidt a few years ago, we discussed…

People who know me know I love to read and during the holidays I look forward to the books I’m inevitably gifted almost as much as I look forward to the fun,…

Want to know something horrifying? The Air Force has a “drone birdhouse” filled with tiny, lethal, buzzing robotic creatures. In a few years, the doors will open and the drone bugs will be released upon the world. Via National Geographic, John Horgan reveals:

DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, has challenged researchers to build drones that mimic the size and behavior of bugs and birds. Cobb’s answer is a robotic hawk moth, with wings made of carbon fiber and Mylar. Piezoelectric motors flap the wings 30 times a second, so rapidly they vanish in a blur.

The Air Force has nonetheless already constructed a “micro-aviary” for flight-testing small drones. In an animated demonstration video, the drones swarm through alleys, crawl across windowsills, and perch on power lines. One of them sneaks up on a scowling man holding a gun and shoots him in the head.

When we think about the psychedelic 60s we often fall back on the folk-jam stoners like The Grateful Dead, the guitar theatrics of Jimi Hendrix, and the ubiquitous “White Rabbit” of Jefferson…