• wfzlsster

    This could be handy if we could only read the chart provided.

  • DrDavidKelly

    Don’t follow this in Australia, you don’t have these rights Downunder. For example, police may search your vehicle based on ‘reasonable suspicion’ – in other words, if they want to.

  • http://slrman.wordpress.com/ James Smith

    These things might have been legal at one time, but today, the USA is a police state and none of this applies. The police can stop anyone at anytime and any refusal to answer question or fail to cooperate in any way can be used as “reasonable suspicion” to do whatever they choose.

  • nubwaxer

    name, rank and serial number. then STFU, except you can’t afford a lawyer when they arrest or detain you out of spite.
    when i was twenty cops never were able to search you or your vehicle without strong positive cause. then twenty years later that was standard approved procedure backed by the courts. now after another twenty years i respect the police less every day when you would imagine that a person would respect the police more the older they were.
    call it nostalgia but i think the fifties and sixties were the best decades ever and we’ve declined ever since.

  • Anthony Neilsen

    Well, my advice to anyone who has nothing to hide is comply with the police in every way you can (within reason, of course.) What do you think you will achieve by being rude or just plain obstinate? You will only make your own trouble.

  • Anthony Neilsen

    Well, maybe my words were a bit too generous towards police. What I perhaps should have said is don;t approach them with an antagonistic, abusive or insulting attitude. Sure, you can assert you rights and say I don;t wish to answer or no – you can’t search my car, stuff like that, but i would not go looking for trouble. That is my point, because a) with a decent cop who only trying to do the right thing, you will make him suspicious of you and b) with a dirty cop, you will give him an excuse to harass you, book you or arrest you.

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