Midday Veil’s Deliciously Witchy New Video (with Interview and Tour Details)

Yep, one the cooler things I’ve ever seen, and hey, I just interviewed Emily Pothast and Steven Miller who are the freakish brainchildren behind the whole thing:

Thad: I found the concept particularly fascinating, because one of the themes that has been interpenetrating my psychic life as of late has been that of female energy consuming and feeding off the masculine — as if the previous era of humanity has shifted and now it’s time for the sacred feminine to devour the dark war mongering energy that “mankind” has created. Terence Mckenna, Whitley Strieber, and others have described encountering entities that have an almost insectile-multi-eyed-telepathic-hive-mind characteristics. I don’t know if you’re up on insect sexuality, but the feminine typically reigns supreme in that micro-verse. There are no King Bees, if you catch my drift. Thoughts?

EP: Oh wow. Well, I mentioned the inspiration of mystery religions, myths that explore the inner workings of sex and death, which definitely relate to the core processes of nature. These myths are at the root of Christianity, but while the basic mechanism of the dying/resurrecting godman is alive and well in the character of Christ, the “feminine” and erotic aspects of the eternal that were also present in early versions of the myth have been considered taboo for most of Western history.

Elsewhere in the world, the Dark Devouring Mother is acknowledged in figures like Rangda or Kali, but in the west, the worship of the sacred feminine has been driven underground, where it has nevertheless persisted in the form of esoteric practice and witchcraft…

It’s interesting that you mention bees because there is such a close association between the symbolism of beehives, the Great Goddess, and witchcraft…

SM: I’ve encountered that insectile DMT universe, but I don’t think that was at play here. It wasn’t until I saw the video completed that I recognized what I was trying to invoke. A coven of witches create a ritual that stir the women at the concert to unleash their subconscious desires to consume David AND call forth the Great Cold of the Night simultaneously: the ritual invokes both the id and superego of feminine energy. David gets buried and consumed, then reborn anew as the dark goddess’ consort. For me, the story isn’t so much about creating a matriarchy as a balancing of the energies. They walk off together hand-in-hand at the end of the story to symbolize that balancing. I’m guessing this story says more about my own subconscious; since I was a child, hermaphroditic angels have always been the enlightened beings in my dreams.

Read the rest of the interview here – do it!

Man, I’d really love to see them live but I don’t live in Seattle. Well, lucky for you, their tour’s just starting and they might be coming dangerously close.

Oh, and didn’t I hear that their Seattle Psych contemporaries Rose Windows just signed to Sub Pop? They did and I imagine you’ll be hearing a bit more about them soon. Until then, you can catch both bands for free at Redefine’s unoffical SXSW party. I’m told there will also be free beer while supplies last. If you happen to be in Austin, you know what to do tripsters.

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  • honu

    Great stuff. Thanks for posting.

  • honu

    Great stuff. Thanks for posting.

  • Matt Staggs

    I LOVE Midday Veil. The author’s old band Black Science is pretty rockin’ too.

  • Matt Staggs

    I LOVE Midday Veil. The author’s old band Black Science is pretty rockin’ too.

  • Thad McKraken

    Oh, and I failed to mention that they’re new album, The Current is amazingly rad. It’s not coming out until May and the only way you can get it at this point (I got an advance) is by going to one of their shows.

    • sOopahvi

      yeeah gurl

  • GregForest

    Pretty cool. As a musician, I wish they would learn the 2nd chord. The loops are more impressive than the humans.

  • GregForest

    Pretty cool. As a musician, I wish they would learn the 2nd chord. The loops are more impressive than the humans.

    • Thad McKraken

      They’re definitely more about atmospherics and composition than blistering musicianship. Sort of like Pink Floyd. It’s easy to forget that absolutely nothing Pink Floyd ever did was difficult to play at all from a technical standpoint. They do very trancey stuff to create a headspace.

      That being said, Timm, the guitar player from that band can really shred and actually used to kick out the jams in a funk outfit believe or not. I will say this though, I’m not normally a fan of improv, and these guys frequently do special improv sets (although their not doing that on their tour). They do it better than pretty much anyone else I’ve seen. Not super easy to make improv sound coherent. They’ve honed it to an art.

    • Thad McKraken

      They’re definitely more about atmospherics and composition than blistering musicianship. Sort of like Pink Floyd. It’s easy to forget that absolutely nothing Pink Floyd ever did was difficult to play at all from a technical standpoint. They do very trancey stuff to create a headspace.

      That being said, Timm, the guitar player from that band can really shred and actually used to kick out the jams in a funk outfit believe or not. I will say this though, I’m not normally a fan of improv, and these guys frequently do special improv sets (although their not doing that on their tour). They do it better than pretty much anyone else I’ve seen. Not super easy to make improv sound coherent. They’ve honed it to an art.

      • honu

        Wellll….first as a musician, I have to disagree with you that what Pink Floyd ever did wasn’t difficult to play. David Gilmour’s sound and licks might not be blistering feats of virtuosity but try to come up with original melodic and iconic guitar lines like he did. Nick Mason’s drumming may seem simple, like Ringo Starr, but the funny thing is, playing a slow tempo, just right, in the pocket with feel and with fills that fit the song just so is alot more difficult than you’d think. I’m a drummer and for years I worked to play fast fills and complex beats. When I joined a band that played very Pink Floydian, slow and moody songs, I found that slowing down and playing just right for the song was harder than playing quickly with more complexity. I know that seems counterintuitive.
        And to your comment about improv…it’s all generally subjective on what you like with that kind of playing but if you’d ever seen a band like Phish play on a good night you might be hard pressed to say they don’t have a stellar sense of improvisation. Beyond a well known band like Phish (who have plenty of haters) there are some pretty incredible improvisational bands out there. I can’t say Midday Veil doesn’t compare to some of the bands I’m thinking about because I’ve never seen them (yet) but I don’t think this song is a good indicator of that part of their sound.

      • honu

        Wellll….first as a musician, I have to disagree with you that what Pink Floyd ever did wasn’t difficult to play. David Gilmour’s sound and licks might not be blistering feats of virtuosity but try to come up with original melodic and iconic guitar lines like he did. Nick Mason’s drumming may seem simple, like Ringo Starr, but the funny thing is, playing a slow tempo, just right, in the pocket with feel and with fills that fit the song just so is alot more difficult than you’d think. I’m a drummer and for years I worked to play fast fills and complex beats. When I joined a band that played very Pink Floydian, slow and moody songs, I found that slowing down and playing just right for the song was harder than playing quickly with more complexity. I know that seems counterintuitive.
        And to your comment about improv…it’s all generally subjective on what you like with that kind of playing but if you’d ever seen a band like Phish play on a good night you might be hard pressed to say they don’t have a stellar sense of improvisation. Beyond a well known band like Phish (who have plenty of haters) there are some pretty incredible improvisational bands out there. I can’t say Midday Veil doesn’t compare to some of the bands I’m thinking about because I’ve never seen them (yet) but I don’t think this song is a good indicator of that part of their sound.

        • Thad McKraken

          Indeed. My old band actually had a drummer that flat out couldn’t play slow. He’d get so off beat with anything with a slower tempo that we basically couldn’t write anything like that. I wanted to do some slower Pink Floyd -esque stuff but he just couldn’t swing it. I’d literally play him stuff like Floyd and Midday Veil and be like, see, simple steady slow beats. Just didn’t compute with the guy.

          That being said, writing and playing are two different things. I could listen to say, a Mastodon song and be like, it would take me like a hundred hours to learn how to play that. Anything by Pink Floyd I could basically learn in an hour. Trust me, a lot of metal dudes I know equate difficult to play with being good. Really weird mentality. Sometimes it works.

    • flipdog

      As a musician, I admire the fact that fellow musicians can refrain from trying to appear clever and virtuosic (which has no point to it except the demonstration of a) hand-eye co-ordination and b) knowledge of esoteric scales) and concentrate instead on just making some damn great music regardless of how good it makes you look in front of other musicians. The job of a musician isn’t to impress other musicians, it is to make the right music for the moment. In my own opinion, of course.

      That said, I still can’t decide whether I like Midday Veil or not, but again, that’s my own opinion.

  • webzombie

    Sorry for not being hip, but what is the deal with the revival of the like occult stuff now-a-days?