Archive | April 19, 2013

Exploring the Implications of Sacred Geometry – A Meeting of Minds

Mind and CosmosWhat do you do with a technologically aided telepathic connection to a rat’s tail?

Odd questions like this become more relevant as developments in cybernetics and communication technology allow for strange interactions with the world around us. Without the aid of creative imagination you get a bizarre bit of cultural kitsch, delving deeper you can encounter profound questions that crack into the mystery of mind and body, and the synaptic symetry defining so much of our self perception. If you tread carefully you enter the realm of Sacred Geometry, encountering applications of mathematics and ratio that bridge the gap between material science and the more aetheral realms of human existence.

It may seem counter-intuitive to connect Sacred Geometry to cybernetics, but in this kind of wider application is exactly the domains where theories of integral mathematics can be most fruitfully applied. The neuro-chemical maps that connect our nervous system to our body and allow us to move are predicated on mathematical relationships that can be found throughout manifested reality.… Read the rest

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Bombs & Karma

Picture: Richard Adams (CC)

Picture: Richard Adams (CC)

Ever since the tragedy at the Boston Marathon on Monday, I’ve been thinking a lot about the idea of karma. Several posts have called out the irony (or Orwellian Doublethink) of the US licking its wounds, while it inflicts similar wounds on innocent bystanders worldwide. Clusterbombs, murdered Afghan and Pakistani wedding parties, “collateral damage” to the civilian population in Iraq, to name a few. I am trying to resist the reductionist conditioning of my western brain that wants to distill the vast cultural complexities of “karma” into a dualist cause & effect dynamic. However, there seems to be something darkly significant to the recent trend of our own innocents being killed by our own citizens. Newtown, Aurora, Tucson, possibly Boston, etc. Anyway, this train of thought led me back to an old classic essay on karma from Robert Anton Wilson. Deepleaf Productions hosts a nice collection of RAW audio & text, and here is an excerpt from Cosmic Trigger:

A Lesson in Karma

Robert Anton Wilson
from Cosmic Trigger – The Final Secret of the Illuminati

Lao-Tse says (at least in Leary’s translation) that the Great Tao is most often found with parents who are willing to learn from their children.

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Today, dedicate an hour of your life to watching Democracy Now’s coverage of Guatemala’s Genocide Trial

via chycho

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While every major news source is bombarding us with what’s transpiring in the United States today, Democracy Now dedicated their full program to the genocide trial taking place in Guatemala and why a judge suspended the trial of the former US-backed dictator.

The following are the two segments presented on Democracy Now. They are essential viewing and well worth the time.

Part 1: Genocide Trial of Former Dictator Ríos Montt Suspended After Intervention by Guatemalan President

Part 2: Exclusive: Allan Nairn Exposes Role of U.S. and New Guatemalan President in Indigenous MassacresRead the rest

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Are Alex Jones’ Conspiracy Theories Beyond the Pale?

The Los Angeles Times is running a poll of its online readers and the scary thing is that only 60% of them are voting “yes” (so far – you can vote too!)

Screen Shot 2013-04-19 at 3.26.01 PM David Horsey writes the accompanying article explaining why the number should be closer to 100%:

Usually, it would be best to ignore conspiracy-mongers such as Alex Jones and not reward him and his angry gaggle of paranoiac followers with any sort of attention. But, in a week when thoughts of the dead and maimed victims of the Boston Marathon bombings weigh heavy on the hearts and minds of most Americans, it is worth pointing out what a worthless waste of skin and bones Jones and his minions happen to be.

Nearly as soon as I heard about the bombings on Monday, I was certain that somewhere in the nutty right-wing blogosphere someone was already concocting a storyline that would blame the crime on President Obama and the federal government.

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Biggest Unsolved Terrorist Attacks in U.S. History

5 Wall St_ Bombing(7)In a list of the “10 Biggest Unsolved U.S. Terrorism Cases,” Parapolitical counts five attacks of greater severity than this week’s marathon bombing that were never solved. Topping that list is the 1920 Wall Street bombing. Ninety-three years after the attack that killed 38 at J.P. Morgan, no one has taken credit.

In close second is the 1975 bombing of New York’s La Guardia airport, an attack that killed 11. The 1916 San Francisco Preparedness Day bombing and the 1933 bombing of United Airlines flight 247 both also had death tolls at, or approaching, double-digits. Neither case has been closed.

Aside from the Boston Marathon attack, the most recent unsolved terrorist bombing in the U.S. was the 1985 murder of Alex Odeh in Santa Ana, California, an attack that resulted in 3 casualties.

Alex Odeh, a Palestinian Christian immigrant to the United States working as regional director of the Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee, was killed in a bombing of the group’s offices as he was preparing to leave to speak at a Fountain Valley synagogue.

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Are Social Networking Websites Doomed?

social networkingSocial networking was supposed to gradually take over more and more aspects of our lives, but instead it may peter out into a sea of old people “liking” promotional posts from corporations.

The answer to the question of what will be the next Facebook could be “nothing”, as younger people appear to be abandoning social networking sites for messaging apps like SnapChat, which doesn’t involve profiles, personal data, companies’ “sponsored stories”, or their parents. Via Buzzfeed:

Facebook is the “most important” social media site for about 10% fewer teenagers than it was a year ago, according to a new PiperJaffray survey of over 5,000 teenagers. The teens surveyed are less interested in Twitter, YouTube, Google+, Flickr, and Tumblr too.

This suggests something bigger than a shift away from Facebook; it hints at what could be the beginning of an across-the-board teen rejection of traditional social networking as a whole.

This data measures sentiment, not usage stats.

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Panting For Breath On A Virtual Shore

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Our brains are being reprogrammed — literally. And not for the better, but droolingly bad.

A “detriment to cognition, concentration, contemplation and psychological health,” causing “structural abnormalities in gray matter” to the tune of a “fifteen percent shrinkage in the area of the brain that controls speech, memory, motor control, emotion, sensory, and other information.”

That´s what research in neuroscience is showing about all of the pervasive technologies — video games, cell phones, televisions, etc — so many of us spend numerous hours hyper-connected to all day long.

And, “This shrinkage is cumulative: The more time online, the more grey matter shrivels.”

“New studies are showing that internet and social media use contribute to or instigate even bigger mental breakdowns: split-personality disorder, delusional and paranoid thought, suicidal thinking, even psychosis . . . psychosis, that is defined as, a loss of what is real.”

These technologies, which we have only really had so dramatically present in our lives for the last five years, are contributing greatly to the mental breakdown of millions of people.… Read the rest

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Existential Despair? Take Two of These and Call Me in the Morning

Please don't give Tylenol to your existentially-challenged cat.

Please don’t give Tylenol to your existentially-challenged cat.

Interesting research from the University of British Columbia: Apparently Tylenol can also ease aches and pains of the existential kind. Look for new Sartre strength in the “Ennui” aisle of your local drug store:

New research this week found that Tylenol altered the way subjects passed moral judgements. Psychologists used that as a proxy measure for personal distress, a relationship that has been previously demonstrated. Daniel Randles and colleagues at the University of British Columbia write in the journal Psychological Science, “The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen.” Totally. More plainly, “Physical pain and social rejection share a neural process and subjective component that are experienced as distress.” That neural process has been traced to the same part of the brain.

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