Sate Your Documentary Addiction

I’m overburdened with media! I’ve a pile of books to read, news to collate, new music to parse and podcasts to digest. My Netflix queue overfloweth. And if I ever get time to devour something in my free time, sadly, it usually isn’t the pure escapism of fiction. I think I’ve been reading non-fiction and watching documentaries for so long, my brain is now wired to be impatient with what should be delicious candy.

My problem is that I continue to welcome all recommendations from friends, co-workers, DJs, online sources, journalists and Disinfonauts. But I am thankful that the terse and listographic nature of the internet, as well as the myriad of sources for content organization, have actually streamlined this process. A digital native, I irrationally worry that I’ll be missing some current event or corner of the world’s many subcultures.

I’ll die before I give up on trying to subsume it all into my subconscious! No really, I will. It’s all too much. The world has a million things.

Hey look!

True Activist has a list of their Top 10 Documentaries that are all available to watch for free, right now! From those well-known and comprehensive releases like Inside Job or Food, Inc. to the much-maligned Maher-produced exposé Religulous, and many more… Agree or disagree with their central conceits, they’re all worth your time. Even the more esoterically aesthetic Zeitgeist series (though I have evidentiary qualms with some of the more dubious claims of the ‘movement’) was thoroughly fun.

Corporatization, international banking and economics, organized religion, society, food production, history, militarism, evolution… *Sigh*. There goes my one day off. And yet another source to add to my soon-to-be-extinct Google Reader. Thanks, True Activist. Thanks, Obama.

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  • BuzzCoastin

    the good & the bad of information overload

    an info junkie before the internet
    had a moderate pace of info gathering
    sometimes it would be years between the discovery of useful info
    used book stores and old libraries held buried treasures
    slowly ideas would emerge from the assorted data
    now
    if you want to find some information on any subject
    the task is to filter the voluminous flow of information
    and one has to narrow ones focus
    in order to be able to process the enormous amount of data

    10 years ago I wanted to grow some food
    some friends who knew things helped me & I found a few books
    today I have a 75GB digital library on sustainable living
    I doubt I will ever read everything in it
    but I could not have amassed this many books & videos
    without information overload conditions

    • Breshvic

      It’s true. It is nearly impossible to go back to the pre-digital life, and we are surely missing something if we did. But now we have to contend with a flood of bad information from both the honestly mistaken and the dishonest miscreants. This should ideally force each of us to build our own SPAM filters, calibrate our bullshit detectors. Many don’t.

      The question I wonder often is; will the internet and our abundance of information access increase or decrease critical thinking overall, or no significant change to the average?

      • BuzzCoastin

        > will abundance of information access
        increase or decrease critical thinking overall

        most people lack the intelligence
        and lack the skills necessary to protect themselves
        most don’t even know their mind has been compromised &
        is not even their own mind
        the thought has never occurred to them
        or they dismiss it as preposterous

        it takes time & initiative to build the necessary filters
        it takes a lot of work to disconnect from the programming
        (American Pop Kulture is a program)
        it takes a lot to realize that media is separate from content
        and that media has it’s own effects
        in addition to being a carrier of programming
        all of which could be discovered by using the internet
        by acting as a probing media ecologist
        and not a consumer for content

  • Monkey See Monkey Do

    The documentaries they listed are all excellent except for ‘Thrive’. People who enjoyed Kymatica should check out http://www.innerworldsmovie.com/. It’s one of the best documentaries I’ve seen in awhile.

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