The House I Live In Takes a Hard Look at The War on Drugs

America’s longest war? The war on drugs. And many contend that it’s the most unsuccessful war as well. For the past 40 years, the war on drugs has resulted in more than 45 million arrests, $1 trillion in government spending, and America’s role as the world’s largest jailer. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available than ever.

From director Eugene Jarecki (Why We Fight) comes an unflinching look at how the War on Drugs has disproportionately disenfranchised, incarcerated, and impoverished African Americans. Trailer below – the film debuts on PBS on April 8th.

For some more clips, visit the Independent Lens site.

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  • nubwaxer

    so this should a republican cause against wasteful government spending. no? follow the money as eventually goes into the hands of the rich.

  • BuzzCoastin

    the war on drugs is about the $1 trillion in government spending
    which goes to the MIBC and
    keeps dark skinned people in prison as slave labor
    making the fact that a dark skinned person is the Leader of the Free World
    an embarrassing farce that only the credulous could buy into

    • Juan

      Word!

  • evan black

    The war on drugs is a success in the same way the war on terror is. Neither is an actual war, but a war of metaphor. They continue to operate in the same way: create a villain for the public to fear (drug cartel, al Qaeda) and the “war” will continue until the villain is vanquished. Both wars are therefore allowed to be fought infinitely since neither can be won. Quite the racket. Don’t neglect to pay your taxes, everyone!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Akordril Sean W Hickey

    This brings to mind the countries that not only made drugs legal but also gave help to “addicts” they worked with them and had a much lower recidivism rate then this country does!

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