Life In America Is Poisonous For Your Body

poisonous

Via TomDispatch, public health historians David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz on how the landscape of everyday life has become awash in toxins:

A hidden epidemic is poisoning America. The culprit behind this silent killer is lead. And vinyl. And formaldehyde. And asbestos. And Bisphenol A. And PCBs.

Without our knowledge or consent, we are testing thousands of suspected toxic chemicals and compounds, as well as new substances whose safety is largely unproven and whose effects on human beings are all but unknown.

While old houses with lead paint and asbestos shingles pose risks, potentially more frightening chemicals are lurking in new construction going on in the latest mini-housing boom across America. Our homes are now increasingly made out of lightweight fibers and reinforced synthetic materials whose effects on human health have never been adequately studied.

Formaldehyde, a colorless chemical used in mortuaries as a preservative, can also be found as a fungicide, germicide, and disinfectant in, for example, plywood, particle board, hardwood paneling, and the “medium density fiberboard” commonly used for the fronts of drawers and cabinets or the tops of furniture. As the material ages, it evaporates into the home as a known cancer-producing vapor, which slowly accumulates in our bodies.

What’s inside your new walls might be even more dangerous. While the flame retardants commonly used in sofas, chairs, carpets, love seats, curtains, baby products, and even TVs, sounded like a good idea when widely introduced in the 1970s, they turn out to pose dangers that we’re only now beginning to grasp. Researchers have, for instance, linked one of the most common flame retardants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, to health effects including thyroid disruption, memory and learning problems, delayed mental and physical development, lower IQ, and the early onset of puberty.

Other flame retardants like Tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate have been linked to cancer. As the CDC has documented in an ongoing study of the accumulation of hazardous materials in our bodies, flame retardants can now be found in the blood of “nearly all” of us.

Lurking in the cabinet under the kitchen sink are window cleaners and spot removers that contain known or suspected cancer-causing agents. The same can be said of cosmetics in your makeup case or of your plastic water bottle or microwavable food containers. Most recently, Bisphenol A (BPA), the synthetic chemical used in a variety of plastic consumer products, including some baby bottles, the lining of tuna fish cans, and even credit card receipts, has been singled out as another everyday toxin increasingly found inside all of us.

The groups that produce these substances — including major companies like Exxon, Dow, and Monsanto – argue that, until we can definitively prove the chemical products slowly leaching into our bodies are dangerous, we have no “right,” and they have no obligation, to remove them from our homes and workplaces. The idea that they should prove their products safe before exposing the entire population to them seems to be a foreign concept.

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  • saint_al

    As far as environmental toxins go, America’s got nothin’ against India (think of the shipbreaking industry). This comment isn’t a slam against the topic; Hell, I live in Cincinnati where it’s unfit to start a garden that isn’t in a raised bed w/ clean soil. Historically, there was lead paint chipping and being swept out, smelting and casting operations, etc. for well over a century. New funky toxins atop that pile doesn’t help.

    • JoiquimCouteau

      DDT, the main cause of the US ‘polio epidemic’ of the late 1940s (until the end of direct spraying in 1951), is now exported in huge amounts to india, afghanistan, and pakistan, where it causes what is euphemistically called ‘post-polio’, a disease identical to ‘polio’.

  • paprtowl

    monsanto and the rest .

  • BuzzCoastin

    it’s not just the US
    but the US makes the poison look & taste better

  • Andrew

    Life in America has poisoned my mind.

  • JoiquimCouteau

    I wish it were, Pur.

  • JoiquimCouteau

    Polio has been well known around the world for thousands of years. Poliomyelitis literally means ‘inflammation of the grey spinal matter’; it describes a set of symptoms that have many causes. Traditionally polio was the disease of painters and metallurgists, in whom it was a manifestation of the neurotoxicity caused by chronic high level lead exposure. As increasingly neurotoxic pesticides (like Lead Arsenate, which DDT replaced) were applied in enormous amounts to food crops, incidence of polio-like conditions increased. After WWII, DDT, whose use had been a secret during the war, was brought home and used in insane quantities. Children would be doused with pure DDT powder in schools to prevent lice. People sold wallpaper saturated with DDT. Housewives sprayed wherever they saw insects (eg, in their kitchens), thinking that by killing the insects they were protecting their children from disease. Morton Biskind (and others) testified before congress about this, leading to the end of ‘direct spraying’ of DDT on humans in 1951, which caused the sharp drop in polio incidence observed after that year, the peak of the ‘epidemic’. The vaccines were not used until 1954, at which point polio incidence had ALREADY decreased by more thanhalf of their 1951 levels.

    The ‘isolation of the poliovirus’ meant only that scientists (popper and landsteiner) induced paralysis in a chimpanzee, by injecting its brain with an ‘ultrafiltrable’ suspension of diseased matter from a paralyzed polio patient. The notion that acute flaccid paralysis spreads by jumping from person to person like a flea is a fairy tale, creating a scapegoat (the virus) for the anger and despair of the public, and promoting the ideology of ‘war on disease’. What does it mean that polio was ‘eradicated’, if hundreds of thousands today suffer from a condition that is identical but for its name?