Psychic Victim: ‘How Could I Be So Stupid?’

via CBS 4 Denver flickr-3505870926-original

LOVELAND, Colo. (CBS4)- A 65-year-old woman who says she lost her retirement savings to a Loveland psychic is now calling the psychic “a complete ripoff” and says she wants others to hear her story and avoid the mistakes she made.

“I look back on it now and think, ‘How could I have been so stupid?’” Francine Evers told CBS4.

Evers handed over more than $73,000 to psychic Adams Marks in a six-month time frame.

Marks has been charged with theft, crimes against an at-risk adult and intimidating a witness.

He declined to talk to CBS4 about the pending criminal case promising, “I’ll have my lawyer call you.”

Evers decided to open up about her experiences with Marks in the hopes others might come forward if they have had similar experiences with Marks even though she acknowledges “It’s embarrassing.”

She met the psychic in 2009 as she was driving by his Loveland psychic business. She said she decided to get a $10 psychic reading because she thought it would be a fun adventure. During the reading, she says Marks upsold her, talking her into an $825 in-depth reading.

“He said that I had serious problems with my aura especially on the right side,” said Evers.

Evers says Marks called her soon after “in a panic… He had also foreseen that due to this something terrible was about to happen to me which he was trying to ward off.”

According to Evers, Marks said he needed $9,700 in $100 bills to gain “power” to ward off the imminent disaster.

Over the next seven months, Evers says Marks convinced and cajoled her into turning over $73,400 plus some valuable family heirlooms, all in the name of healing her damaged aura.

“I believed him and trusted him,” said Evers.

A business school graduate and former white-collar executive, Evers was asked how someone so smart could fall for Marks’ pitch.

“I ask myself every day,” said Evers. “I don’t know, I don’t have a good reason.”

Evers said Marks promised to return all of her money, that he was only keeping it to give him “power” and that it was being kept safe in a cave near Estes Park.

“He was a very good con man,” said Evers.

READ MORE

,

  • David Duke-Astin

    storing money in a cave is a red flag, right?

  • http://twitter.com/alanpeart Alan Peart

    “A business school graduate and former white-collar executive, Evers was asked how someone so smart could fall for Marks’ pitch.”

    I think this is the best possible demonstration of the real value and difficulty of a “business school” degree.

    • echar

      Shouldn’t she be aware of what an up sale is, considering her business degree? I worked sales and I know the triggers used to get people to buy.

  • echar

    She said she decided to get a $10 psychic reading because she thought it
    would be a fun adventure. During the reading, she says Marks upsold
    her, talking her into an $825 in-depth reading.

    That escalated fast!

    • David Duke-Astin

      I doubt that intelligence has anything to do with a person’s vulnerability to psychic scams. Psychics are very good at using emotional triggers, leaving rationality far behind. We don’t know for sure, but this woman may have been lonely or grieving – like pure gold for psychics.

      • echar

        I agree with with everything you say here. It must be the way I was raised, because even spending the $10 would be a moral struggle within.

        Asking $825 is fighting words, if you get what I mean.

    • BuzzCoastin

      that’s pretty much SOP for this con
      bait & switch
      usually the reading finds a dark cloud following you
      and for another $?????? it can be removed

      • echar

        It’s a ballsy push. Way more than the past life reading. Inevitably everyone was a prince or something totally awesome. Who wants to hear that they were a grave robber, ditch digger, prostitute, serial killer, etc in a past life?

        • Noah_Nine

          or even worse, a serf or a servant… basically something completely boring but realistic…

          • echar

            If we accept the suspension of disbelief and take a look at this. There was way more of the mundane way back when.

      • Calypso_1

        You’ve worked in the medical industry haven’t you?
        ; )

        • BuzzCoastin

          right, I hadn’t thought about it that way before
          but asymptomatic patients are often diagnosed with a disease
          usually cancer
          and then “treated” with drugs & therapy that bankrupt purse & health
          fear and superstition tend to be the driving forces there too

  • BuzzCoastin

    this has got to be the oldest psyche con game in the world

    there are some great descriptions of these con techniques in
    The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
    in case you too want to be a psycheat
    or defend against one

    • echar

      Thanks for the recommend.

  • Noah_Nine

    I think I’ve driven passed that shop before in Loveland….

  • Bob Cash

    Jist to record the most obvious fact.
    ANYONE claiming to be psychic is in one, or both, of only two states.
    1) A CON ARTIST.
    2) MENTALLY UNWELL.
    Join the campaign to change our stupid laws which actually condone LEGALISED THEFT!
    Protect the feeble-minded and vulnerable.
    Email your M.P. (or gov rep.) to raise the issue to prohibit these thieves from advertising or performing.

21