Archive | June 5, 2013

Cost of Resiliency in Kids Uncovered

Enfants_des_ruesVia ScienceDaily:

Children living in poverty who appear to succeed socially may be failing biologically. Students able to overcome the stress of growing up poor are labeled “resilient” because of their ability to overcome adversity, but University of Georgia researchers found this resiliency has health costs that last well into adulthood.

“Exposure to stress over time gets under the skin of children and adolescents, which makes them more vulnerable to disease later in life,” said Gene Brody, founder and director of the UGA Center for Family Research.

Looking at a sample of 489 African-American youths from working poor families in south Georgia, Brody evaluated the overall poverty-related risks experienced by children annually at ages 11 to 13 as well as teacher-reported competence. Allostatic load, a measure of wear and tear on the body, was taken for each child at age 19. Allostatic load is a measure of stress hormones, blood pressure and body mass index.

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Sangreal, The Holy Grail: Recovering the Cosmic Science of Antiquity – Part 2.

“Hear ye the history of the most holy vessel that is called the Grail,
in which the precious blood of Jesus was received
on the day that He was put on the Cross.”
Perlesvaus: Anonymous
– Early 13th Century

Last month, in the article Sangreal, The  Holy Grail: Recovering the Cosmic Science of Antiquity – Part 1  I wrote,

“That the Grail has a cosmic dimension of meaning is indicated unequivocally by the texts themselves,” and also “. . . ancient adepts had a highly sophisticated concept of Exobiology and the Grail as a symbol was a repository of this knowledge.”

I also listed some of the varied symbols and meanings that have been associated with the Grail through the centuries.… Read the rest

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Government Data Suggests That Blacks Are Singled Out For Marijuana Arrests

marijuana possession arrests

What does one call laws that are selectively enforced on different segments of the population? The New York Times reports:

Black Americans were nearly four times as likely as whites to be arrested on charges of marijuana possession in 2010, even though the two groups used the drug at similar rates, according to new federal data.

Though there has been a shift in state laws and in popular attitudes about the drug, black and white Americans have experienced the change very differently. Public attitudes toward marijuana softened and a number of states decriminalized its use. But about half of all drug arrests in 2011 were on marijuana-related charges, roughly the same portion as in 2010.

“We found that in virtually every county in the country, police have wasted taxpayer money enforcing marijuana laws in a racially biased manner,” said Ezekiel Edwards, the director of the A.C.L.U.’s Criminal Law Reform Project. In 2010, states spent an estimated $3.6 billion enforcing marijuana possession laws, a 30 percent increase from 10 years earlier.

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