Is Yonaguni Monument The Japanese Atlantis?

yonaguni monumentIs the breathtaking stone structure the work of a 10,000-year-old civilization, or is it somehow an illusion? Atlas Obscura explains:

The Yonaguni-jima Kaitei Chikei, literally translated as “Yonaguni Island Submarine Topography,” is an underwater mystery off the coast of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. The massive underwater rock formation is speculated to have existed for more than 10,000 years, but whether the formation is completely man-made, entirely natural, or merely altered by human hands is still debated.

The monument was first discovered in 1986 by a diver. Masaaki Kimura, a marine geologist at the University of the Ryukyu, explored the monument for nearly two decades. Kimura remains convinced that the site was carved thousands of years ago, when the land mass was above water.

According to Kimura, the Yonaguni’s right angles, strategically placed holes and aesthetic triangles are signs of human alteration. He also claims that carvings exists on the monuments, resembling Kaida script. He believes that a pyramid, castles, roads, and monuments can be identified within the structure–which is evidence that the monument is what remains of the Lost Continent of Mu, the Japanese equivalent to Atlantis.

, , , , , , , ,

  • BuzzCoastin

    this debate amazes me
    kick open Google Earth sometime
    it’s pretty obvious that a lot of what was once above water
    is now under the ocean
    in the attached pic
    everything in light blue was above sea level 20,000 years ago
    so obviously this temple was above water then

    • Juan

      Of course, I agree. The thing is though, that the possible age of this temple does not fit the current paradigm within archeology. According to them, the earth at that time was populated by neolithic hunter gatherers. Therefore, so goes their thinking, there is no way humans could’ve possibly built such a structure.
      Now, there are of course people who have been challenging this paradigm for many years; Graham Hancock, John Anthony West, Robert Schoch, et al.
      Also, that Ancient Aliens dude with the crazy hair and the spray on tan, but I think we can just ignore him, except of course for a laugh or two.

      • BuzzCoastin

        modern archo-histrology is a synopsis
        of something wee know very little about
        but it’s easier to teach the simple story in schools
        to people who will never think about it
        except on the final exam

        but really
        Google Earth and a little knowledge of climatology
        and Lafayette, nous voilà

        Hancock et al, started talking about this
        before it was easily verified

        • InAwe

          I agree. Until looking into the matter, I just assumed that modern archo-history was correct beyond any reasonable doubt. Wrong yet again lol.

          Given that its not, such discoveries along with other works/ideas of Hancock (any other notable ideas I should explore?) tickle my curiousity bone.

          I was ever so tragically sad as a child when one day I realized that Atlantis was not real…the same child in me is back and bubbling with excitement at what all this could mean.

          • BuzzCoastin

            I keep a small collection of things relevant
            that pertain to the vanished past
            but there’s not much
            and there’s no knowing anything certain about it
            but by the same token
            there is much we can note
            to piece together a rough outline

            a lot of the very ancient texts & oral myths have clues
            pointing to past ages when humans were gods
            and with technologies & knowledge far beyond our own

            it’s an interesting puzzle to contemplate

          • Matt Staggs

            I love that stuff. I’m not sure if you ever read much fiction, but Robert E. Howard’s fantasy work was pretty much all set in an antediluvian Earth. It makes sense given that books like Ignatius Donnelly’s Atlantis book and Madame Blavatksy corpus were influences, among many other works of history that were “outdated” even at his time. All that being said, I think that his “pseudohistory” was eerily close to what we’ll eventually accept to be true. I may be overstating the case, but I’ve told Graham Hancock that he’s a modern day Galileo. Useful tip for dealing with hardline Skeptics (the Mutaween of science): Ask which book they disagree with and what claims, specifically, do they reject? As usual for most, this particular brand of fundamentalists are citing scripture and verse rather than reading the literature and judging the claims therein based on their own merit.

          • BuzzCoastin

            I’ve read Blavatksy & Donnelly
            but in Hawaii & Asia it’s all about Mu
            of which this temple was likely a part of

            it also occurred to me (& others I’m sure)
            that Buddhism & Taoism are likely the detritus of Mu

            I don’t really think it’s mission critical
            that people get this
            nor do I think there is much wee can say beyond
            wee really don’t know what went before us
            but there’s plenty of evidence that they did amazing things
            the remnants of which wee can only marvel about

          • InAwe

            Brilliant stuff, going to check some of the things mentioned.
            Given the quantity of info out there, I’d say I’m still an new-comer dabbling in this.

            Recently, I’ve been finding many interesting points of connection in hindu mythology. I’ve grown up with such concepts in the background, so when i started reading into other things, my mind would spark a connection with the stories and ideas surrounding ancient times.

            yes, marvel we shall.

      • Mind T. Gap

        http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lscnpeBnRa1qjtg6no1_400.jpg < "
        …not sayin', but… " < lol.
        More articles along these lines < potential past civilizations < as long as they're backed by some legit time, energy by peeps in appropriate fields of experience (education (higher) & past serious inquires.)

    • Chugs Rodiguez

      @buzzin yeah but the sea level ten thousand years ago wasn’t that low. Maybe millions of years ago but if the yellow sea was ground we’d of known about it.

      Nor was China a stone age tribe at the time (8,000 bc).

      • BuzzCoastin

        no one has verified the date of that structure (to my knowledge)
        more likely it’s older than 10K
        and
        according to Chinese history they were a stone age tribe 8,000bce
        according to their history
        Fu Xi and his sister Nüwa survived a great flood about 3000bce
        and started Hua-Xia civilization

        “Fu Xi taught his subjects to cook, to fish with nets, and to hunt with weapons made of iron. He instituted marriage and offered the first open-air sacrifices to heaven.”

        Wikipedia

        PS: 3000bce is a watershed date in human chronology
        something was happening at that time
        that completely disrupted world civilizations
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/30th_century_BC
        you might note that a significant number of civilizations
        “start” at that time & several end

    • eyebeam

      That doesn’t prove that it was human-made, however. Sandstone, and some other rocks, can naturally fracture at right angles, often giving the appearance of “steps.” I’ve seen this phenomenon quite frequently. One image I could find easily shows the regular fracturing of Berea Sandstone under a layer of Cleveland Shale
      http://www.noaca.org/bedrk.jpg
      As the river erodes away layers under the sandstone, it tends to form right angle block-like formations.
      Here is a stair-like formation in granite on Rag Mountain, in the Appalachian Blue Ridge Mountains:
      http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/17633842.jpg

      From the Wikipedia:
      “Some of those who have studied the formation, such as geologist Robert Schoch of Boston University, state that it is most likely a natural formation, possibly used and modified by humans in the past. Schoch observes that the sandstones that make up the Yonaguni formation “contain numerous well-defined, parallel bedding planes along which the layers easily separate. The rocks of this group are also criss-crossed by numerous sets of parallel and vertical (relative to the horizontal bedding planes of the rocks) joints and fractures. Yonaguni lies in an earthquake-prone region; such earthquakes tend to fracture the rocks in a regular manner.”[1][11] He also observes that on the northeast coast of Yonaguni there are regular formations similar to those seen at the monument.[1][12] Schoch also believes that the “drawings” identified by Kimura are natural scratches on the rocks.[11] This is also the view of John Anthony West.[3] He also suggests that walls are simply natural horizontal ‘platforms’ which fell into a vertical position when rock below them eroded and the alleged roads are simply channels in the rock.[9]”

      It’s fun to imagine an ancient city sinking beneath the waves, but I think obsessing too much about these things can distract from real mysteries that need solving.

      • BuzzCoastin

        get a grip
        it’s obviously man made
        and there are thousands of these kinds of structures
        off the coasts of every continent
        even conventional archeology acknowledges that

        it’s ridiculous & modern
        to assume that the rising of the ocean
        didn’t swallow up civilizations whole

        • eyebeam

          I think you missed the point there… It’s not “obviously man-made,” when people who are experienced in looking at rocks and understanding how they form, have actually visited the site, and say they cannot positively conclude it is man-made.

          That doesn’t mean it can’t be man-made, or that humans couldn’t have lived there and possibly modified some of the terrain, but nothing is “obvious” about it.

          And regardless of any conclusions about this site, I have said nothing about other sites, or whether the rising oceans could or could not have swallowed up human settlements – there are other sites where it is actually obvious that this has happened. But just because there are other sites that are obviously submerged human settlements, does not prove that any other submerged site must be a human settlement.

          • BuzzCoastin

            I think you’re missing the point
            those with vested interests in mainstream archeology
            are the ones who have their doubts about it’s being man made

          • eyebeam

            What vested interest? Who benefits from a cover-up?

            Scientists are in constant competition with each other, they love to find new discoveries before anyone else. If any geologist had definitive proof of this being a man-made structure, you can be sure he or she would want to take credit for it, get grants to excavate it, publish books about it…

            On the other hand, falsely proclaiming the remains of an ancient civilization is certain career death for a “mainstream” archaeologist. I think cautiousness, rather than deliberate obfuscation, is a more likely motive for anyone to resist labeling this “man-made” (assuming it is).

            I would love to see this turn out to be some lost sunken city, but there’s only so much energy to expend on wishes – sometimes you just have to say, “interesting – more data needed” and move on.

          • BuzzCoastin

            > Who benefits from a cover-up?

            you make like this is a rare event
            whereas, usually in all sciences
            a challenger to prevailng theories are always held at bay
            preserving the status quo has many benefits
            otherwise there would be no attempt to preserve it
            mainstream Egyptology hasn’t changed much in 100 years

            and make note that
            there has been little to no underwater archeology
            because it is technically challenging
            and much more expensive
            than sending some grad students to a dig in the boonies

            Indian recently discovered “some lost sunken city”
            The Cambay Ruins
            that probably dates from around the same time

          • eyebeam

            I’m not making like anything, you’re projecting that.

            Sometimes things don’t change for a long time because the alternatives really aren’t compelling. The Yonaguni monument is in shallow, warm water, so they’re much easier to explore than, say, something at the bottom of of the Black Sea, so it’s not difficult to get a decent look at them.

            I’m aware of the Cambay Ruins, I remember when they were discovered, but those are quite “obvious,” with carved human figures and pottery artifacts.

            Here’s a page on Yonaguni, written by someone who has made several in-person dives to explore them:

            http://www.robertschoch.com/yonagunicontent.html

            “As difficult as it may be for some to believe, after carefully studying the Yonaguni Monument I have to report that I do not believe it is an artificial, human-made structure. It is indeed an absolutely incredible structure, and well worth seeing, but I must conclude that, based on all of the evidence, it is primarily a natural structure. The rocks of the region break out neatly, both along horizontal and vertical planes, and naturally form the step-like appearance. This is seen both underwater and on the surface of Yonaguni.

            “However, if I simply state that the Yonaguni Monument is natural, I leave out part of the story. On the island is evidence of very ancient human habitation, including tombs and other structures artificially carved from the bedrock (see the accompanying photo) that I am convinced mimic, and were stylistically inspired by, the natural features of the island, including the step-like features now submerged by the ocean. Indeed, I believe that even though the Yonaguni Monument may be primarily natural (say, over 95% natural), parts may have been “touched up” by ancient humans and the ancient inhabitants of the island may have both admired and utilized the Yonaguni Monument.”

            Seems pretty reasonable to me, but that’s just me.

        • eyebeam

          I think you missed the point there… It’s not “obviously man-made,” when people who are experienced in looking at rocks and understanding how they form, have actually visited the site, and say they cannot positively conclude it is man-made.

          That doesn’t mean it can’t be man-made, or that humans couldn’t have lived there and possibly modified some of the terrain, but nothing is “obvious” about it.

          And regardless of any conclusions about this site, I have said nothing about other sites, or whether the rising oceans could or could not have swallowed up human settlements – there are other sites where it is actually obvious that this has happened. But just because there are other sites that are obviously submerged human settlements, does not prove that any other submerged site must be a human settlement.

  • Sean Canning

    If this structure is man-made we’d better get started rewriting the history texts!

    10,000+ year old complex found under water. For comparison that’s 8k years before the pyramids were constructed.

21