The Child and Its Enemies

220px-Emma_goldman_1886By Emma Goldman, via the Anarchist Library:

Is the child to be considered as an individuality, or as an object to be moulded according to the whims and fancies of those about it? This seems to me to be the most important question to be answered by parents and educators. And whether the child is to grow from within, whether all that craves expression will be permitted to come forth toward the light of day; or whether it is to be kneaded like dough through external forces, depends upon the proper answer to this vital question.

The longing of the best and noblest of our times makes for the strongest individualities. Every sensitive being abhors the idea of being treated as a mere machine or as a mere parrot of conventionality and respectability, the human being craves recognition of his kind.

It must be borne in mind that it is through the channel of the child that the development of the mature man must go, and that the present ideas of the educating or training of the latter in the school and the family — even the family of the liberal or radical — are such as to stifle the natural growth of the child.

Every institution of our day, the family, the State, our moral codes, sees in every strong, beautiful, uncompromising personality a deadly enemy; therefore every effort is being made to cramp human emotion and originality of thought in the individual into a straight-jacket from its earliest infancy; or to shape every human being according to one pattern; not into a well-rounded individuality, but into a patient work slave, professional automaton, tax-paying citizen, or righteous moralist. If one, nevertheless, meets with real spontaneity (which, by the way, is a rare treat,) it is not due to our method of rearing or educating the child: the personality often asserts itself, regardless of official and family barriers. Such a discovery should be celebrated as an unusual event, since the obstacles placed in the way of growth and development of character are so numerous that it must be considered a miracle if it retains its strength and beauty and survives the various attempts at crippling that which is most essential to it.

Indeed, he who has freed himself from the fetters of the thoughtlessness and stupidity of the commonplace; he who can stand without moral crutches, without the approval of public opinion — private laziness, Friedrich Nietzsche called it — may well intone a high and voluminous song of independence and freedom; he has gained the right to it through fierce and fiery battles. These battles already begin at the most delicate age.

The child shows its individual tendencies in its plays, in its questions, in its association with people and things. But it has to struggle with everlasting external interference in its world of thought and emotion. It must not express itself in harmony with its nature, with its growing personality. It must become a thing, an object. Its questions are met with narrow, conventional, ridiculous replies, mostly based on falsehoods; and, when, with large, wondering, innocent eyes, it wishes to behold the wonders of the world, those about it quickly lock the windows and doors, and keep the delicate human plant in a hothouse atmosphere, where it can neither breathe nor grow freely.

Zola, in his novel “Fecundity,” maintains that large sections of people have declared death to the child, have conspired against the birth of the child, — a very horrible picture indeed, yet the conspiracy entered into by civilization against the growth and making of character seems to me far more terrible and disastrous, because of the slow and gradual destruction of its latent qualities and traits and the stupefying and crippling effect thereof upon its social well-being.

Since every effort in our educational life seems to be directed toward making of the child a being foreign to itself, it must of necessity produce individuals foreign to one another, and in everlasting antagonism with each other.

The ideal of the average pedagogist is not a complete, well-rounded, original being; rather does he seek that the result of his art of pedagogy shall be automatons of flesh and blood, to best fit into the treadmill of society and the emptiness and dulness of our lives. Every home, school, college and university stands for dry, cold utilitarianism, overflooding the brain of the pupil with a tremendous amount of ideas, handed down from generations past. “Facts and data,” as they are called, constitute a lot of information, well enough perhaps to maintain every form of authority and to create much awe for the importance of possession, but only a great handicap to a true understanding of the human soul and its place in the world.

Read more here.

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7 Responses to The Child and Its Enemies

  1. Washichu Rehab June 23, 2013 at 12:17 pm #

    Well said.

  2. Chaorder Gradient June 23, 2013 at 12:47 pm #

    I wish no one would have told me what to do when i was growing up.

    Just think how many video games I could have played!

    • Simon Valentine June 23, 2013 at 1:01 pm #

      lol!
      do i detect a dash of irony?
      you are
      the man of steel?!??

  3. Microhero June 23, 2013 at 1:35 pm #

    How is the present any different from what always was..

    Despite all the shortcomings of modern education paradigms we are in a lot of ways, better off, and there’s room for improvement.
    What we now have and never did before is access to information, lots and lots and lots of it. So much so it can be crippling rather than liberating. Still it is whithin our reach to use as we please…

    The shaping effects of societies on individuals have taken many forms but are ever present and I imagine that the absence of shaping might be a shaping of its own.

  4. Joe Nolan June 23, 2013 at 5:45 pm #

    Nice post. Thanks for the library link as well!

  5. Rhoid Rager June 23, 2013 at 5:53 pm #

    I love Emma!

  6. jnana June 24, 2013 at 1:36 pm #

    i like to imagine we exist before we enter this world and newborns are still fresh from that other world. it saddens me to see them conform to this world, but how else can it be? who can escape the corruption of this life? are we all doomed to rust and decay? and those who even dare to assert their selves, are we so sure it is truly themselves they are asserting and not just a knee-jerk reaction, and more corruption?

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