July 2013











Dr. Paul Craig Roberts writes at Global Research: In various articles and in my latest book, The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism And Economic Dissolution Of The West, I have pointed out…


Could the police themselves be throwing Molotov cocktails in order to justify the police crackdown? The New York Times ponders:

40 seconds of video released by Rio’s military police showed a man near the front line between the two sides lighting and then hurling a Molotov cocktail, which exploded near officers in riot gear. Within hours the clip was mysteriously removed from YouTube.

According to the theory advanced by supporters of Brazil’s protest movement, the bomb thrower pictured in the police video, wearing a T-shirt with a bulky design on the front, was identical to a man caught on video later, retreating behind police lines and pulling off his T-shirt, alongside a second man also suspected of being an undercover officer.

Other bloggers pointed out that another video clip recorded by a witness to Monday’s demonstrations showed the same two men passing unmolested through a crowd of uniformed officers after displaying identification:



I first saw George Carlin perform live when I was 17 and that instance came with it the completely revelatory vision of my life with and in comedy. The introduction came in…












Perhaps not the reception the new pope was hoping for. Via PressTV:

Brazilian police have used tear gas and water cannons to disperse protesters in Rio de Janeiro rallying against the vast amount of public funds spent on Pope Francis’ visit to the country.

The demonstration was held on Monday near the Rio state governor’s palace after a meeting there between the pope and President Dilma Rousseff. One photographer suffered a head injury after being clubbed by a riot police officer and at least five protesters were arrested.

The Brazilian government has spent $53 million in public funds for the
Pope’s week-long visit to the country, which is his first trip abroad after becoming head of the Catholic Church in March. The protesters argued that the government should instead spend public funds on health, education and other public services.