Royal Baby Bollocks

On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin goes over two news stories being overshadowed by the corporate media’s fixation on the royal baby, including the case of New York Times journalist James Risen facing jail time for refusing to testify in the criminal case of a CIA leaker, as well as the admission by the Tokyo Electric Power Company that that radiation has been continuously leaking from the damaged nuclear facility in Fukushima since the 2011 earthquake.

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  • Ted Heistman

    A thought occurred to me of a different view of royalty other than the view from the politically incensed oppressed proletariat. I think maybe they are sort of like pets. Its like a symbol of the wealth and power of the Nation as a whole. Kind of like how a prosperous person may have a big fancy Garden and menagerie of exotic cattle and fowl. Some Nations have royalty. Its like a monument or a piece of architecture.

    Its like a symbol of the Aristocracy but not really the Aristocracy itself. So, I mean some people are into them. Hollywood celebrities are kind of a similar thing but not as tied into feelings of patriotism. Sure its a waste of money, but so are lots of other things. I guess I am not really as up in arms about it.

    • Anarchy Pony

      An interesting perspective…

      • Ted Heistman

        Thanks, I got this idea from a story about an African tribe that sent its “best couple” to the Capital city of whatever country they were in, to be some type of representatives for their tribe. I wish I could find it. But it got me thinking that maybe that type of idea is where royalty originated.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    I think if people want to move the agenda, they’re going to have to devise their own calendar of celebrations.

    People like stories, and especially stories that are optimistic and make them feel special. Remember Kurt Vonnegut’s narrative arc theory?

    http://thedesigngym.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/vonnegut.jpeg

    A skilled story teller ought to be able to craft engaging tales with prosocial themes, but my sense is that this is rarely done because of the relentlessly negative attitude that most humanists have towards fiction. They are so frightened of the God fantasy that they are unwilling to admit that fantasy is inevitable. In short, they are wet blankets.

    Who the hell WOULD want to be around such people?

    • Ted Heistman

      I think one interesting trend is turning wild animals and indigenous people into celebrities. There are some drawbacks to it. Namely commodification and exploitation but I think its a better gauge of the ecological health of society than how fabulously wealthy royalty is. If there are more acres of forest and wildlife every year and happy indigenous people living on the Amazon it might be a good indication that things aren’t going all that bad. This seems to be the trend of cable t.v. programming on the Animal planet, discovery etc.

      I think the health of the royal baby is seen as an omen, maybe celebrities tied into the health of the biosphere would be a better omen people could hone in on.

      I know I just like knowing there are wild places left in the World even if I never see them. I care a lot more about that than the royal family