Officially The NYPD Has No Duty to Protect & Serve

Joe Lotizo updates us with the latest from this case against the NYPD and city of New York.

Two years ago Lotizo was attacked by a man in the NYC subway who was on a rampage killing people throughout the city. Lotizo managed to take the man down but while doing so suffered multiple stabbing wounds, mainly to the head. While this was taking place, there were 2 NYPD officers watching nearby who only stopped in once the man was disarmed, they then later took credit for the apprehension. Lozito filed charges against the city for the officers not taking any action and the city is now claiming that they have no legal duty to protect any members of the public. Lotizo explains what has happened since he filed charges and what he plans to do next.

Watch the first video where Joe Lozito tells his story of what happened that day on the subway:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZKVSNjlSp0

Via WeAreChange

, , , ,

  • BuzzCoastin

    the city is now claiming
    that they have no legal duty to protect any members of the public
    anyone watching the actions of pig herds knows this
    and that
    they are obliged to protect & serve their monied masters

  • Eric_D_Read

    I thought this precedent was settled nationwide years ago.

  • WTFMFWOMG

    Look up Warren v. District of Columbia. (444 A.2d. 1, D.C. Ct. of Ap. 1981)

  • emperorreagan

    I generally only think of calling the police for non-emergencies – I need a police report because my insurance company doesn’t believe someone broke into my property unless I get a police report, someone is behaving oddly or might be in some sort of distress, etc.

    • sonicbphuct

      I can understand the property reports, but I (personally, I mean) would never call the police on a human being. Even if I was in distress, I have *zero* faith that they would actually help me in any way at all. I have much more faith that they would, in fact, cause more distress, if not injury or death. From my perspective, I would rather call a local gang of Crips or Bloods to help out.

      • emperorreagan

        I’ve called 311 twice on people: once when after talking to a woman & she told me she wasn’t okay and once after trying to help an elderly man figure out where he lived to no avail. 311 always sends a cop first, so even if what’s needed is medical or social services, you’re really calling the cops.

        Fortunately nothing bad came of either situation.

        • sonicbphuct

          I’ve got a friend that takes some fairly strong psychotropic drugs for a diagnosis that I don’t know. He had gone on a party bender for his birthday and missed his meds for 3 days. I found him wandering the streets crying near my apartment, so I brought him in. Not fully knowing what was going on, I gave him some beer and herbs, thinking that might calm him down. Unfortunately, he was fully freaked out, talking about how it was his duty and responsibility as an American to kill G.W. Bush. I, unfortunately, found that funny and accurate, at which point he decided to call the police on himself. When they arrived, 3 cars deep with no ambulance, I was running interference. I had to beg – literally, beg – that they not cuff him and beat him, explaining that he hadn’t had his meds and simply needed to get to the hospital to get some. One cop was semi-descent, and removed the cuffs and put him in his car. I asked if it was ok to follow them to the hospital, to which he replied, “you can meet him there, but don’t follow the police.” I did follow them, but stayed several cars behind. Luckily, everything worked out without severe beatings.

          Since moving to Switzerland, i’ve discovered you can call the Ambulance here on a different number that doesn’t bring the police, as well as the fire department. Stupidly, the only number I ever remember is the one I don’t want to call – the police.

          • Calypso_1

            I’m surprised they removed the cuffs for a psych welfare transport.

  • InfvoCuernos

    They should have “stop and frisked” that serial killer, but that would have made people safer. They were too busy shaking down weed dealers.

  • Chugs Rodiguez

    Whenever I’ve been in NY I’ve always had the feeling the cops weren’t their to stop criminals or protect people, more like they’re prison guards and we’re the prisoners.

    The way the eye people down, their stance and the way they carry those ugly black automatic weapons.

    Its like their undecided on whether they want to line us up against a wall and shoot us or beat us to death with their batons/tasers.

  • Anthony Neilsen

    They are there to enforce the many many laws and keep citizens under
    submission and in fear. America, you threw God out of your schools, your
    courtrooms, and every public institution. Separation of church and state? Bullshit. Now accept the consequences.
    Things will get worse as long as God is not there to protect.

  • sonicbphuct

    That’s a bit of false dichotomy, not to mention probably bullshit. I’m sure every prisoner in the Good Ol’ USofA cares about their rights. However, knowing them, and being able to defend them appropriately against a superior force are two radically different things.

21