• Hadrian999

    only thing to do with detroit is bulldoze it and start over

    • lifobryan

      The city of Detroit is not its government. The city is its people … the people who band together in neighborhoods to rip down abandoned houses and plant gardens. The people who fund their own street lights. The people who patrol their own blocks at great risk because the city can’t afford to. And no governmental authority, whether city, state, or national, understands the difference between municipal balance sheets and the lives of the flesh & blood humans. Sure, bulldoze bits of it. The sensible assistance from state & national authorities would be to help it contact …. shrink its footprint and concentrate resources into a manageable area. That would make a huge difference in the day to day lives of actual people.

      • Hadrian999

        the city has no industry a reputation for lawlessness and corruption, nobody wants to go to detroit, nobody want’s to invest in detroit, and the poor bastards that own homes there cant even give that property. the city in never going to rise again

        • lifobryan

          Detroit will not rise again as a model of the past. But something new is happening on the ground there … something that has nothing to do with traditional investment & industry. People who have nowhere to go but up are gradually taking control, neighborhood by neighborhood. This is a slow, laborious transformation that has everything to do with the immediate reality that people face everyday, and very little to do with official schemes. “Nobody wants to go to Detroit?” Tell that to the artists and counter-culturalists that are moving there to make art out of landscapes of ruin. Detroit is witnessing an unusual rebirth …. not rising from the dead like a gargantuan municipal Jesus, but more like a garden of flowers blooming out of a corpse. In that sense, it may become a post-industrial, post-ruin model of the future that other cites just might want to keep an eye on …..

          • Hadrian999

            artists and counter-cultural types aren’t going do anything for the people who can barely get by, I will agree they are much like a flower garden, pretty to some but won’t feed anyone.

          • lifobryan

            Bulldozing the city won’t feed people either. The point I’m trying to make is that certain communities are carving something new out of a city of ruins … on their own. The flip-side of lawlessness & inept governance is that people actually have some creative freedom to explore unique solutions. And the necessity of interdependence within neighborhoods is actually beginning to build strong community foundations. There is a lot going on in the periphery in Detroit … hidden in plain view of a media eye that only sees the blight.

  • Chris

    Actually Detroit is well into the biggest comeback this country has ever seen. The bankruptcy was a necessary step in order for the city to restructure. We house the largest automaker in the world and the largest online mortgage retailer that did over 60 billion dollars in business last year. What was stale mated the progress was the city itself. The city government and council was filled with deception and underhanded tactics. I have lived in Detroit area my entire life, I have never seen the city alive and thriving as it is right now. Years of poor decision making and lower populations have taken away the tax base necessary for the geverment to stay a float. It makes me laugh when a writer takes something like a bankruptcy and spins it into doom. That’s exactly what every magic investor wanted. Detroit will be just fine, get over it already.

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