U.S. Military Will Have ‘Iron Man’ Suit Prototype In 12 Months

As disinfonauts well know, any cool invention from science fiction will eventually become science reality, Iron Man suits are on the way reports the Los Angeles Times:

Army Capt. Brian Dowling was leading his Special Forces team through a steep mountain pass in eastern Afghanistan when insurgents ambushed his patrol, leaving two of his soldiers pinned down with life-threatening wounds.

After a furious firefight, the two men were rescued, but that episode in 2006 would change Dowling’s life.

Now employed by a small defense company, he is part of a crash effort by U.S. Special Operations Command to produce a radically new protective suit for elite soldiers to wear into battle — one with bionic limbs, head-to-toe armor, a built-in power supply and live data feeds projected on a see-through display inside the helmet.

They call it — what else? — the “Iron Man suit.”

“We’re taking the Iron Man concept and bringing it closer to reality,” said Dowling, referring to the Marvel Comics character Tony Stark, an industrialist and master engineer who builds a rocket-powered exoskeleton, turning himself into a superhero.

The Special Operations Command began soliciting ideas for the suit this year from industry, academia and government labs, and has held two conferences where potential bidders, including Dowling’s company, Revision Military, demonstrated their products. Military officials say they are trying to produce a working prototype within the next 12 months. But no contracts have been signed, and the Pentagon has not ventured to make a cost estimate.

The metal suit the Pentagon wants would be all but impervious to bullets and shrapnel, and be able to continuously download and display live video feeds from overhead drones. Relying on tiny motors, the exoskeleton would enable a soldier to run and jump without strain while carrying 100 or more pounds.

It would, at least in theory, be able to stanch minor wounds with inflatable tourniquets — in the unlikely event the armor is breached. It also would carry a built-in oxygen supply in case of poison gas, a cooling system to keep soldiers comfortable and sensors to transmit the wearer’s vital signs back to headquarters…

[continues in the Los Angeles Times]

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  • Noah_Nine

    these would not be very cost effective…. if they couldn’t even afford to bulletproof the humvees how are they gonna pull this off….?

    • jnana

      will probably not be for every soldier. just for special ops

  • Tuco

    Fuck auto-play!

    • http://disinfo.com/ Majestic

      yeah sorry ’bout that. Hit pause…

  • Haystack

    An Iron Man suit just isn’t as cool when you use it against child soldiers in Afghanistan.

  • Yūgen

    Is there any higher irony than people rejecting the notion that humanity is brain damaged when we are constantly spending trillions of dollars and our most advanced technology on ever more efficient ways of killing other members of our own species?

    Not to mention that the materials are extracted from the bones of a dying world, as McKenna said. Our situation is a kin to children killing their parents and trashing their house without even realizing it, until the roof caves in once in a while and reality makes a jolt back into awareness.

  • BuzzCoastin

    ‘Iron Man’ Suit = cyborg drone

    how much more BORG can they get?

  • TheLie

    It would be cheaper if the United States openly embraced fascism and unleashed their drone fleets without even pretending to be bound by law or morality.

  • Rhoid Rager

    Weak infidels need this mechanical advantage to match with the soldiers of Allah!

  • I_abide

    If they plan on operating like the video shows and walking in to fire I hope the armor has some really good shock absorption. Otherwise they’ll just be going down from blunt force trauma.

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