Is Death An Illusion? Evidence Suggests Death Isn’t the End

Robert Lanza, MD sheds some light on  death with quantum physics.  Or does he?

via Robert Lanza: Biocentrism

After the death of his old friend, Albert Einstein said “Now Besso has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me. That means nothing. People like us … know that the distinction between past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”

New evidence continues to suggest that Einstein was right – death is an illusion.

Our classical way of thinking is based on the belief that the world has an objective observer-independent existence. But a long list of experiments shows just the opposite. We think life is just the activity of carbon and an admixture of molecules – we live awhile and then rot into the ground.

We believe in death because we’ve been taught we die. Also, of course, because we associate ourselves with our body and we know bodies die. End of story. But biocentrism – a new theory of everything – tells us death may not be the terminal event we think. Amazingly, if you add life and consciousness to the equation, you can explain some of the biggest puzzles of science. For instance, it becomes clear why space and time – and even the properties of matter itself – depend on the observer. It also becomes clear why the laws, forces, and constants of the universe appear to be exquisitely fine-tuned for the existence of life.

Until we recognize the universe in our heads, attempts to understand reality will remain a road to nowhere.

Consider the weather ‘outside’: You see a blue sky, but the cells in your brain could be changed so the sky looks green or red. In fact, with a little genetic engineering we could probably make everything that is red vibrate or make a noise, or even make you want to have sex like with some birds. You think its bright out, but your brain circuits could be changed so it looks dark out. You think it feels hot and humid, but to a tropical frog it would feel cold and dry. This logic applies to virtually everything. Bottom line: What you see could not be present without your consciousness.

In truth, you can’t see anything through the bone that surrounds your brain. Your eyes are not portals to the world. Everything you see and experience right now – even your body – is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. According to biocentrism, space and time aren’t the hard, cold objects we think. Wave your hand through the air – if you take everything away, what’s left? Nothing. The same thing applies for time. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Consider the famous two-slit experiment. When scientists watch a particle pass through two slits in a barrier, the particle behaves like a bullet and goes through one slit or the other. But if you don’t watch, it acts like a wave and can go through both slits at the same time. So how can a particle change its behavior depending on whether you watch it or not? The answer is simple – reality is a process that involves your consciousness.

Or consider Heisenberg’s famous uncertainty principle. If there is really a world out there with particles just bouncing around, then we should be able to measure all their properties. But you can’t. For instance, a particle’s exact location and momentum can’t be known at the same time. So why should it matter to a particle what you decide to measure? And how can pairs of entangled particles be instantaneously connected on opposite sides of the galaxy as if space and time don’t exist? Again, the answer is simple: because they’re not just ‘out there’ – space and time are simply tools of our mind.

Death doesn’t exist in a timeless, spaceless world. Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time, but resides outside of time altogether.

CONTINUE READING

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  • http://www.macewan.org macewan

    Nour Foundation – non local consciousness

  • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/mattsdirtylifeandtimes Matt Thompson

    Take that anthropic principle, and run like hell with it, son.

    • Rhoid Rager

      More like solipsistic principle.

  • Harry McNicholas

    Sorry but without the eyes, the consciousness wouldn’t see anything. Without the brain there would be no consciousness. If you think differently, ask someone who is blind what they see. Ask someone who is deaf what they hear. This argument is silly. Trying to bring in quantum physics is dumb as they come. There is no evidence of any of this nonsense.

    • Capital G

      Maybe you should! Blind people have reported having near death experiences where they could see, and deaf people where they could hear. There are numerous books on near-death experiences written by credible scientists and doctors that prove exactly what you claim is nonsense.

    • Reasor

      The word “quantum” has replaced “herbal” and nearly replaced “organic” as the preferred buzzword among quacks nowadays.

      • Calypso_1

        I recall seeing a cosmetic product that trumpeted the inclusion of plant “stem cells”.
        I can only imagine the marketing meeting when that moment of genius was born.

        • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

          well if the stem is woody already wouldnt the stem cells already be dead?

          • Calypso_1

            it included herbal products w/ non woody stems. The implication of their advertising was that they had an isolate of undifferentiated cells, as opposed to cells from the stem.

          • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

            wai u kill my bad joke

    • Mictlantecuhtli

      WTF, you can see dreams even though you sleep eyes closed. There is no evidence that conciousness=brain.

  • Simon Valentine

    speaking of illusion, i thought the GIF had the intention of swinging the scythe upwards very fast and letting gravity bring it back so he can show off again

    maybe it’s just me

  • ziplock9000

    I see no evidence. Just because particles decay very slowly does not mean a human exists after death.

  • oneironauticus

    A conversation when I was 13:

    friend: I’m gonna be like, so pissed if there’s no afterlife.
    me: No, you won’t.
    friend: Yeah, I’d be like, what, just nothing forever? That’s boring!
    me: You won’t be there to be bored of the nothingness.
    friend: Huh?

    This particular friend wasn’t terribly bright…

    • chupacabra007

      Oh, it’s “ego.” One must work hard to even be aware of it.

  • drokhole

    I’m partial to Alan Watts waxing poetic on the subject. Short clips (might be some overlap):

    Death
    http://youtu.be/6VN8jwM4HbI

    Death & Your Disallusion (Dissolution)
    http://youtu.be/NffeosIaH_Y

    Discusses Nothing
    http://youtu.be/ssf7P-Sgcrk

    The Dream of Life
    http://youtu.be/wU0PYcCsL6o

    A fantastic half-hour episode from a series he did in the late 50s:

    Alan Watts: Death
    http://youtu.be/K0mdOvNEUiA

    And, for those in it for the long hall, a great lecture series-in-one:

    The Inevitable Ecstasy
    http://youtu.be/c-hGhhR6i5M

  • Andrew

    This article has convinced me to become a climate change denier so that it won’t happen in my world. Same thing with Fukushima.

    Also, there is no NWO, and both government and corporations have my best interests at heart.

    • echar

      Put the kool-aid down.

      • Andrew

        I’ve chosen my past. Ask yourself why you’ve chosen one with so many threats to your well being.

        • echar

          Because I can? Freewill?

          • Andrew

            Those are the hows, not the whys.

          • echar

            May as well ask the sun why it rises.

          • Andrew

            Does the sun rise? Does it have as much free will as you? Who is the master who makes the grass green?

          • echar

            The earth tilts, and the sun is percieved through the seasons as an analemma. We are the masters that percieve the grass as green. I do not know if anyone made it such.

            http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/files/2009/08/Analemma2.jpeg

  • DrDavidKelly

    The article is right. Of course things go on after we die … but without our consciousness what can we possibly make of it all? Death is not the end but more of an impasse to understanding.

  • Calypso_1

    Ole Death has some piss poor mowing technique.

    • Rhoid Rager

      Seeing that GIF made me miss my beloved scythe. I was starting to develop some good technique before we had to move. Now there’s nothing but sickles here in Japan. The scythe is a distinctly European tool. Everyone else gets on their hands and bloody knees to do the detail stuff. One could likely write a lengthy tome about how pruning tools have developed in tune with cultural attention spans.

      • Calypso_1

        Did you ever sing while scything?
        Given all the associated harvest rituals and games, I believe an entire cannon of work song, most probably related to goddess worship, was lost with the decline of hand mowing.

        • Rhoid Rager

          I agree with your assessment. I found myself pacing my breath as I did my work to fall in time with the sweeping of the scythe. I was teaching a class on epistemology at the time, so rather than singing, I would often give timed lectures to the quack grass on the merits of constructivism as I decapitated them.

          • drokhole

            If you haven’t read it already, I think you might enjoy this article:

            http://www.orionmagazine.org/index.php/articles/article/7277

          • Rhoid Rager

            Scythe lore, Ted Kaczynski and Ivan Illich. That was a great article. Thanks for the cite.

          • drokhole

            Happy to oblige!

          • Iuwus

            i do that when i’m doing something that makes me breathe harder, i also get a compulsion to add a tune or song to it, like a simplistic nursery rhyme that just repeats over and over. how curious, calypso.

          • Calypso_1

            In many ways it is an algorithm. If the body is going to maintain a constant pace to task it needs physiological regulation and breath control is an excellent method.

            Conscious control of breathing is a part of language/sound expression, acquisition of which would be co-evolutionary with the freeing of the hands/use of tools/indetermination of body function.
            In theories related to the bicameral mind, elements of primitive mind states might be closer to certain dynamics seen in schizophrenia. Language-wise this includes rhyming, alliteration, obsessive/illogical repetition.

            So perhaps, just as we produce sounds as a byproduct of certain physiological states, the emergence of sound patterns/proto-song/language could have been a top down regulatory control for the body itself.

            PS:
            I am reminded of gibbons as well. Incredible song-like vocalizations but the primary sound is in time with their trapeze like brachiation.

          • Iuwus

            >So perhaps, just as we produce sounds as a byproduct of certain physiological states, the emergence of sound patterns/proto-song/language could have been a top down regulatory control for the body itself.

            that’s so beautiful. look at the elegant complexities that arise as a result. rats have a lovely way of expression too, they chatter their teeth really fast in accordance to how they are functioning. usually it’s an expression of joy and contentedness. there are all kinds of subtle variations in pitch, rhythm and velocity which go by almost too fast to spot.

  • Calypso_1

    Article Abstract:
    “Evidence” = “Non Sequitur”

    • echar

      After reading further on this subject, it seems that some people’s reactions ( sombunall knee jerk) are through preconcieved themes they have pertaining to afterlife, death, etc.

      Perthaps some have an addiction to evidence or being right?

      • Tuna Ghost

        Science is evidence based. If what you’re doing isn’t evidence based, it isn’t science.

        • echar

          And science is always the answer?

  • DeepCough

    All this evidence suggests to me is that scientists fear the terminality of death as much as anyone else would.

    • Calypso_1

      ‘Scientists’ or one scientist author tossing off his personal memoir & rehashed new age notions related to quantum physics for which he’ll make bank?

      • DeepCough

        I thought I already covered the Eban Alexander story.

  • gelikeasics

    We talk to ourselves incessantly about our world. In fact we maintain
    our world with our internal talk. And whenever we finish talking to
    ourselves about ourselves and our world, the world is always as it
    should be. We renew it, we rekindle it with life, we uphold it with our
    internal talk. Not only that, but we also choose our paths as we talk to
    ourselves. Thus we repeat the same choices over and over until the day
    we die, because we keep on repeating the same internal talk over and
    over until the day we die. A warrior is aware of this and strives to
    stop his internal talk.

    -A Separate Reality

    When a warrior learns to stop the internal dialogue, everything becomes
    possible; the most far-fetched schemes become attainable.

    -Tales of Power

    Once inner silence is attained, everything is possible. The way to stop talking to ourselves is to use exactly the same method used to teach us to talk to ourselves; we were taught compulsively and unwaveringly, and this is the way we must stop it: compulsively and unwaveringly.

    -The Fire From Within

  • X.

    Life knows nothing of death.

  • Bobananda Das

    of course our existence continues, but not in any form that would give people a warm cozy feeling

    our existence continues absent any concept of egoic identity

    imagining what is left after our egoic identity is stripped from our consciousness reveals that death is actually very real.

    • Robert J. Bullock

      Then what is left? If it has no identity, it’s pretty useless.

      • Andrew

        Au contraire, identity limits.

  • Niklas Beith

    http://www.tor.com/stories/2010/08/divided-by-infinity guess what now you can be more afraid of perpetual life than permanent death. welcome to my last few days. dont read if youre experiencing existencial depression right now.

    • Juan

      Awesome story; I really enjoyed it. Thanks:)

  • Tuna Ghost

    “Robert Lanza, MD sheds some light on death with quantum physics. Or does he?”

    Hint: no, he doesn’t.

    For instance, it becomes clear why space and time – and even the properties of matter itself – depend on the observer. It also becomes clear why the laws, forces, and constants of the universe appear to be exquisitely fine-tuned for the existence of life.

    Neither of these statements are true.

    If there is really a world out there with particles just bouncing around, then we should be able to measure all their properties.

    There is no reason to think that this should be the case. The history of scientific study actually points in the completely opposite direction.

    …space and time are simply tools of our mind.

    This has no bearing on the afterlife as described in this article.

    Long story short: this absolutely isn’t science.

    • joaquindemancha

      Glad you cleared this up for us.

  • Lygeia

    This sentence from the article is just beyond weird, especially the part about genetically engineering” people so that they “want to have sex like with some birds”:

    “In fact, with a little genetic engineering we could probably make
    everything that is red vibrate or make a noise, or even make you want to
    have sex like with some birds.”

    Either the author has lost the plot a bit; or, as I am hoping, this is a mistranslation of what he actually meant to say.

  • bovii

    Bullshit Quantum Woo.

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