Ryan Shapiro: The Punk Rocker Who Can Liberate Your FBI File

Will Potter profiles Ryan Shapiro for Mother Jones:

Ryan Shapiro has just wrapped up a talk at Boston’s Suffolk University Law School, and as usual he’s surrounded by a gaggle of admirers. The crowd­, consisting of law students, academics, and activist types, is here for a panel discussion on the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, a 2006 law targeting activists whose protest actions lead to a “loss of profits” for industry. Shapiro, a 37-year-old Ph.D. student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contributed a slideshow of newspaper headlines, posters, and government documents from as far back as the 1800s depicting animal advocates as a threat to national security. Now audience members want to know more about his dissertation and the archives he’s using. But many have a personal request: Would Shapiro help them discover what’s in their FBI files?

The clip below shows Shapiro at an animal-rights conference, using some of the documents he obtained to make fun of the FBI’s investigative methods.

He is happy to oblige. According to the Justice Department, this tattooed activist-turned-academic is the FBI’s “most prolific” Freedom of Information Act requester—filing, during one period in 2011, upward of two documents requests a day. In the course of his doctoral work, which examines how the FBI monitors and investigates protesters, Shapiro has developed a novel, legal, and highly effective approach to mining the agency’s records. Which is why the government is petitioning the United States District Court in Washington, DC, to prevent the release of 350,000 pages of documents he’s after.

Invoking a legal strategy that had its heyday during the Bush administration, the FBI claims that Shapiro’s multitudinous requests, taken together, constitute a “mosaic” of information whose release could “significantly and irreparably damage national security” and would have “significant deleterious effects” on the bureau’s “ongoing efforts to investigate and combat domestic terrorism.”

So-called mosaic theory has been used in the past to stop the release of specific documents, but it has never been applied so broadly. “It’s designed to be retrospective,” explains Kel McClanahan, a DC-based lawyer who specializes in national security and FOIA law. “You can’t say, ‘What information, if combined with future information, could paint a mosaic?’ because that would include all information!”…

[continues at Mother Jones]

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One Response to Ryan Shapiro: The Punk Rocker Who Can Liberate Your FBI File

  1. Cortacespedes November 15, 2013 at 3:51 am #

    “The FBI considers it a national security threat to make public its reasoning for considering it a national security threat to use federal law to request information about the FBI’s deeply problematic understanding of national security threats.”

    Oh, just give the man his 350,000 pages of documents, he couldn’t possibly read them all.

    It was all redaction? In that case, I’ve already read them. (It was scintillating!)

    Perhaps it’s time to draw the curtains on this “Theatre of the Absurd.”

    The labyrinth of bureaucracy is now closed.

    Have a happy orange juice!

    But please forward your privacy waiver to Mr. Shapiro to request future information from the now, should the “box office” unburn and reopen anytime soon.

    What the world needs now is thread.

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