Violent Criminals: Terrible Twos Who Stay Terrible?

Picture: Marc Majcher (CC)

Picture: Marc Majcher (CC)

New research findings claim that violent criminals are basically overgrown babies, or someone whose neural pathways have strong connections with the emotional–territorial circuit on the Eight-circuit model of consciousness.

Via The New York Times

To understand the violent criminal, says Richard E. Tremblay, imagine a 2-year-old boy doing the things that make the terrible twos terrible — grabbing, kicking, pushing, punching, biting.

Now imagine him doing all this with the body and resources of an 18-year-old.

You have just pictured both a perfectly normal toddler and a typical violent criminal as Dr. Tremblay, a developmental psychologist at University College Dublin in Ireland, sees them — the toddler as a creature who reflexively uses physical aggression to get what he wants; the criminal as the rare person who has never learned to do otherwise.

In other words, dangerous criminals don’t turn violent. They just stay that way.

These findings have been replicated in multiple large studies by several researchers on several continents.

“It’s highly reliable,” said Brad J. Bushman, a psychology professor at Ohio State University and an expert on child violence, who noted that toddlers use physical aggression even more than people in violent youth gangs do. “Thank God toddlers don’t carry weapons.”

The son of a professional football player, Dr. Tremblay played football himself and was fascinated with its regulated version of extreme physical aggression. After college he did social work in a prison and saw firsthand how seldom such programs changed violent criminals. By the time the violent child gets big, it’s often too late.

So he trained his focus earlier and earlier, and learned that the younger the children, the more they whacked each other. With adolescents, physically aggressive acts can be counted in incidents per month; with toddlers, he said, “you count the number per hour.”

In most children, though, this is as bad as it gets. The rate of violence peaks at 24 months, declines steadily through adolescence and plunges in early adulthood. But as Dr. Tremblay and Daniel S. Nagin, a criminologist at Carnegie Mellon University, found in a pivotal 1999 study, a troublesome few do not follow this pattern.

The study tracked behavior in 1,037 mostly disadvantaged Quebec schoolboys from kindergarten through age 18. The boys fell into four distinct trajectories of physical aggression.

The most peaceable 20 percent, a “no problem” group, showed little physical aggression at any age; two larger groups showed moderate and high rates of aggression as preschoolers. In these three groups violence fell through childhood and adolescence, and dropped to almost nothing when the boys reached their 20s.

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  • DeepCough

    “Adulthood is the ever-shrinking period between childhood and old age. It is the
    apparent aim of modern industrial societies to reduce this period to a
    minimum.”
    ~Thomas Szasz

    • echar

      This is wrong, therefore I bite you.

      • DeepCough

        You’re such a toddler!

  • Damien Quinn

    “We start as toddlers. We learn through conditioning, as we heed
    requests not to hit others but to use our words. We learn self-control.
    Beginning in our third year, we learn social strategies like bargaining
    and charm. Perhaps most vital, we use a developing brain to read
    situations and choose among these learned tactics and strategies.

    But what of the relative few who remain physically aggressive?”

    I suspect nobody ever conditions them to not hit others, violence remains the most effective tool at their disposal and only tapers off if it’s effectiveness is reduced. Why assume otherwise?

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More in Aggression, Carnegie Mellon University, Crime, Eight-circuit model of consciousness, Ohio State University, Toddler, University College Dublin
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