Kung Fu Movie Genre Inventor Run Run Shaw Dies At 106

run run shawVia the New York Times, pretty much all you could ask for in an eccentric billionaire movie mogul:

Run Run Shaw, the colorful Hong Kong media mogul whose name was synonymous with low-budget Chinese action and horror films — and especially with the wildly successful kung fu genre, which he is largely credited with inventing — died on Tuesday at his home in Hong Kong. He was 106.

Born in China, Mr. Shaw and his older brother, Run Me, were movie pioneers in Asia. In 1924 Run Run and Run Me turned a play called “Man From Shensi” into their first film. In Hong Kong, Run Run Shaw created Shaw Movietown, a complex of studios and residential towers where his actors worked and lived.

Mr. Shaw enjoyed the zany glamour of the Asian media world he helped create. He presided over his companies from a garish Art Deco palace in Hong Kong, a cross between a Hollywood mansion and a Hans Christian Andersen cookie castle.

His “Five Fingers of Death” (1973), considered a kung fu classic, was followed by “Man of Iron” (1973), “Shaolin Avenger” (1976) and many others.

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  • Chaos_Dynamics

    Blade Runner – 1982.

  • Jin The Ninja

    i’m not saddened, but affected. shaw bros itself created a legacy in chinese cinema, martial arts cinema & culture, and global cinema & culture.
    quite a few films from the studio are masterpieces (and quite a few are hokey cheap filler films). so i can honour run run for that. as well as my own personal family connection to Shaw Studios Malaysia (MFP).

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