Can We Learn About Privacy From Porn Stars?

I understand taking on another name, yet I have to wonder if these porn stars are turning to the media to promote their goods. What say you disinfonauts?

Detail of a New York Times Advertisement – 1895 (wikimedia- Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs) (PD)

via New York Times

 I DIDN’T expect to become a porn star. People rarely do. I was 19 years old, and my photographer roommate had an offer from a website to buy some nude pictures. We did a shoot and then waited two weeks in case I woke up in a panic over the idea of releasing naked photos of myself into the world. But I didn’t, and so I turned to the required paperwork. One of the boxes to fill in read “Stage Name (if applicable).”

Stage names are common in the entertainment industry — whether in Hollywood, rap or pornography — and they’re used for all sorts of reasons. But at a time when people can be whoever they like on the Internet, when we are all negotiating who we are in which setting and for which audience, somehow the combination of a woman whose job is fantasy and her fantasy professional name can make people lose their minds.

Consider the recent hysteria over the Duke University student who moonlights as an adult film starlet. Although it didn’t take long after the news broke for her fellow students and strangers to gleefully post her legal name online, “the Duke porn star,” as she has been called by media outlets from Forbes to The Guardian, has tried to control what she is called where. She used the pseudonym Lauren when giving interviews, and the pseudonym Aurora for her stage name in those same interviews. Finally, this week, she acknowledged her actual stage name — Belle Knox.

The whole kerfuffle doesn’t need to be as dramatic as people seem to think. For me, choosing a stage name felt less like concealing my identity (especially since I’d just turned over my Social Security number to strangers) and more like deciding on a user name for any Internet service or website.

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  • kowalityjesus

    “They’re often the same people who refer to my orifices as ‘that’ instead
    of ‘your,’ as though the body part in question is running around
    free-range instead of attached to a person with free will and autonomy.”

    This is an interesting objectification. She calls it an insult, but philosophically, isn’t the entire pursuit a manipulation of desire, and those the tools of the trade?

    • InfvoCuernos

      Is she really so self absorbed that she thinks people that are watching porn are watching because they care about HER? I would think that the best case would be objectification. isn’t that what regular actors strive for?

  • BuzzCoastin

    Can We Learn About Privacy From Porn Stars?

    yes
    wee learned that people who live in glass houses
    don’t mind being stared at & objectified for money
    so
    maybe if they paid me for the invasion of my privacy
    and compensated me for the violationof my civil rights
    I might not mind it as much
    cause I’d be like a porn star

  • Rus Archer

    if you’re going to do something that requires a pseudonym
    name yourself after your grandma

    • Mr Grim

      I prefer to use the name of someone else’s grandma.

      Ah, how I miss ol’ ‘Granny Grim’…

  • Thurlow Weed

    My stage name is Thurlow Weed.

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