LSD Reconsidered for Therapy

William Rafti (CC)

William Rafti (CC)

Strange as it may seem in what in many cases is an extremely reactionary period of time, the war on some drugs has loosened up considerably and not just in the burgeoning mariajuana legalization movement. Research into the medical benefits of psychedelic drugs has resumed and appears to be making significant headway. The New York Times reports on the comeback of LSD in psychiatric treatment:

He heard about the drug trial from a friend in Switzerland and decided it was worth volunteering, even if it meant long, painful train journeys from his native Austria and the real possibility of a mental meltdown. He didn’t have much time, after all, and traditional medicine had done nothing to relieve his degenerative spine condition.

“I’d never taken the drug before, so I was feeling — well, I think the proper word for it, in English, is dread,” said Peter, 50, an Austrian social worker, in a telephone interview; he asked that his last name be omitted to protect his identity. “There was this fear that it could all go wrong, that it could turn into a bad trip.”

On Tuesday, The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease is posting online results from the first controlled trial of LSD in more than 40 years. The study, conducted in the office of a Swiss psychiatrist near Bern, tested the effects of the drug as a complement to talk therapy for 12 people nearing the end of life, including Peter.

Most of the subjects had terminal cancer, and several died within a year after the trial — but not before having a mental adventure that appeared to have eased the existential gloom of their last days.

“Their anxiety went down and stayed down,” said Dr. Peter Gasser, who conducted the therapy and followed up with his patients a year after the trial concluded.

The new publication marks the latest in a series of baby steps by a loose coalition of researchers and fund-raisers who are working to bring hallucinogens back into the fold of mainstream psychiatry. Before research was effectively banned in 1966 in the United States, doctors tested LSD’s effect for a variety of conditions, including end-of-life anxiety.

But in the past few years, psychiatrists in the United States and abroad — working with state regulators as well as ethics boards — have tested Ecstasy-assisted therapy for post-traumatic stress; and other trials with hallucinogens are in the works.

“The effort is both political and scientific,” said Rick Doblin, executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a foundation that has financed many of the studies. “We want to break these substances out of the mold of the counterculture and bring them back to the lab as part of a psychedelic renaissance.”…

[continues at the New York Times]

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  • Andrew

    Good news for psychiatry!

  • BuzzCoastin

    I’m looking forward to the daze
    when my family doctor can prescribe a hit of Windowpane
    cause pig pharma & pig healthcare are my friends
    (the acid told me so)

  • Lookinfor Buford

    2CI 1/per year to give your life the gilded perspective it deserves.

  • Oginikwe

    LSD therapy never ended. It’s gone on at the Jung Institute as well as in California.

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