‘Octopuses Of The Night’ Captures Cephs At Play

We’re swimming with the octos of the night, so baby take my tentacle it’ll be alright

Seriously, though, this is a great video of octopuses frolicking around the ocean floor off the coast of the Philippines.

I’ve been fascinated with these creatures since I was a child. It all started with a cheap rubber octopus toy my father bought me. I recall thinking that they were scary monsters (which was super cool to a little boy) until I began borrowing books about them from my local library, which as I recall had a lot of sixties-era young adult science books with yellowing pages, workmanlike line illustrations, and thick library-bound covers with stickers that announced they were bound by prison inmates. I still managed to accrue enough information about the creature to understand that they weren’t monsters: They were highly intelligent masters of camouflage and notorious escape artists, to boot. This new impression was reinforced by this particular book; one of three my parents were able to afford before canceling their subscription. (I still remember bawling as my mother turned the delivery man away. What ever happened to cash on delivery?)

I watched every nature program about octopuses that I could (as well as a few horror movies) and nurtured a desire to own my own. This continued until I learned that they don’t live much longer than a year, which I suppose is just long enough to become emotionally attached to one.

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  • Echar Lailoken

    Even if one could get past the short lifespan, I bet it’s tough to keep them. I imagine the tank would have to be large. Add on top of that the cost of salt for the water and then daily maintenance. It would probably be best to keep a supply of live food for them in another tank. So several thousand just to get setup, as well as several months to make the salt water just so.

    • InfvoCuernos

      I kept saltwater fish for years before the guilt of killing beautiful fish overcame me. Octopus is one of the hardest things to keep, as they are just about impossible to keep inside the tank. They are pretty easy to feed, and will take frozen food right from your hand. You just have to overcome the guilt of imprisoning an obviously intelligent being against its will, and also the fear that Cthulhu will smash your house first for enslaving one of its young.

      • Echar Lailoken

        It’s incredibly easy to kill all fish, but especially saltwater. The cheap saltwater fish are like $15, and that’s if you can find a deal. They are also the less impressive ones. I always get a kick out of the Blennies though. I didn’t know that about the frozen food. Does feeding them live make them more aggressive or something? If it was me, I’d want feed them the best.

        • InfvoCuernos

          You pretty much have to keep an octopus separate from anything you don’t want killed. They are crazy predators and anything that’s too big to be eaten by the ‘pus will be nibbling on them. Live food that you feed them is different than what they eat in the wild, so you don’t want to overdo it. I understand that feeding too much live food will cause a fish’s liver to shut down, but I’m not sure about octopus. Anyway, in the time it’s taken us to talk about it, an octopus would have escaped a tank and made it almost to the front door.

          • Echar Lailoken

            Like most creatures, they are likely better off in their natural habitat.

          • JohannaHolkhamred321

            just before I looked at the receipt ov $8130 , I
            didn’t believe that my sister woz like actualy bringing in money part-time from
            there pretty old laptop. . there aunts neighbour has been doing this 4 only
            about 22 months and at present repayed the mortgage on their appartment and
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  • 5by5

    Shouldn’t it be Octopii of the Night?

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