Randall Carlson and Joe Rogan Wax Philosophic on Atlantis, The Cosmic Destiny of Mankind, and Cycles of Catastrophe


Via SacredGeometryInternational.com

“A mind blown is a mind shown.”

Was the ‘mythical’ lost civilization of Atlantis a reality? Is it possible that we’ve lost technically advanced civilizations previously and are just now re-membering and recovering from the global catastrophe  of ~ 13,000 years ago?  Is such a ‘total recall’ representative of a turning point in the evolution of modern man, establishing a new paradigm and challenges for our species? Challenges which once understood, could set humankind on the path to cosmic consciousness? Is our destiny to become a space faring species, mining asteroids, building celestial arks and sailing cosmic seas in pursuit of intergalactic wisdom and redemptive/restorative knowledge? Just a few of the probing philosophical questions raised in this epic dialog between 32˚ Freemason and independent scholar Randall Carlson and the inimitable Joe Rogan.

And if you would like to get a sneak peek on what could be the biggest story on the planet.  Please feel free to check out Cosmic Patterns and Cycles of Catastrophe featuring Randall Carlson

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  • terrasodium

    good ole Joe, from fear factor to philo sophia factor, gotta love the factory life.

    “Clowns are the pegs upon which the circus is hung” P.T. Barnum

    • aaron

      Obviously you havnt heard any of his standup making fun of fear factor or his standup in general or heard any of his podcasts.

      • terrasodium

        haven’t watched his MMA commentary either. I’ve been in proximity to enough entertainer types to have formed an opinion on the the acts of the actors and their funny anecdotes apologizing for pimping themselves out for a paycheck in the name of entertainment. These guys will change their minds based solely on who is paying, that is the actors trade standup or podcasting included.

        • aaron

          He admits he did it for the money but that doesn’t make his stand-up any less funny or the stuff he talks about in some of his stuff any less true. He is surprisingly a lot more intelligent than fear factor of UFC give credit to or some nonsense you read to form judgements on when you havnt heard any of his stuff.

          • terrasodium

            would his wit and commentary be of any use if he were in charge of your life raft on the sea of amusements and weapons of mass dis-traction in this post -industrial era?

          • aaron

            Although I agree with what you are saying about most people being distracted by stuff because they are too obsessed with the massive distraction campaign that includes entertainment and amusement on TV, sports, etc that doesn’t mean you should have none in your life or even dislike standup comedy. If you feel the need to have no entertainment or amusement for your self then I feel bad for you because you must live a sad dull depressed existance. It can be argued that too much of anything is a bad thing so the need to find a balance is obviously necessary

          • terrasodium

            I like bread and circus as much as any tax serf could or should , it’s the two things that my superiors provide to keep me from finding a way off of the cattle pharm. A joke , a poke and a smoke and it’s all good, git some , hooooraaa.

            P.s. must be getting hot in the valley there , the pines in Payson might be a good spot to beat the heat?

          • Echar Lailoken

            Speaking of which, if I was stuck on a raft… I’d rather it was with someone who has a sense of humor instead of someone shitting their pants (pointing and complaining in your case) over the unknown or even sharks in the water. Talk about distraction and completely missing the pint, sheesh!

          • terrasodium

            your paraphrasing of my text has an interesting take on the conversation at hand ,most helpful thanks , no shitting or pointing or complaining , no speculating of the unknown or known(sharks) , a good laugh trumps all in most situations , have I missed your point(s)? could be one day I might find a maturity to laugh in the face of the abstract-negative and concreteness of life, maybe Joe has it right about the destiny of mankind in the cosmic sense, and catastrophe is a hoot as a standup routine. thanks again I’ll try and laugh more .

          • Echar Lailoken

            Wow, I didn’t realize that you are so hardcore. You got it all figured out, for sure.

          • terrasodium

            that has to be the best selfie of 2014 ! a pic of Larry, Curly and Moe would have been better rhetorical device.

  • misinformation

    Randall Carlson may be able to keep Rogan’s dick jokes at bay. If so, this will be sweet.

  • Neon Suntan

    Was the mythical lost civilization of Atlantis a reality?
    – No.
    Is it possible that we’ve lost technically advanced civilizations previously and are just now remembering and recovering from the global catastrophe of ~ 13,000 years ago?
    – Well anything’s possible, but probably not.
    Is such a ‘total recall’ representative of a turning point in the evolution of modern man, establishing a new paradigm and challenges for our species?
    – Based on the former I’m going to say no.

    I wonder what they fill the rest of the show with?

    • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

      Unfortunately the rest of the show was filled with this… http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Graham_Hancock

      • Neon Suntan

        Randall Carlson is such a renegade that not even the skeptics bother with him.

      • misinformation

        Is it ironic to post a rational wiki page about someone in order to, I guess, debunk (or at least as an appeal to ridicule) a different person?

        I suppose I could link to the “rationalwiki” pages on 9/11 in order to discredit the work there but I won’t.

        • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

          I didn’t post that for no reason… his name was dropped in the interview half a dozen times, and his work (if you can call it that) was referenced repeatedly.
          #9 #1491 #2160

          • heinrich6666

            Funny. For being ‘rational’ that entry is is less a point-by-point than a long, smug sneer.

          • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

            The editors there have a healthy sense of humor. “They hate you if you’re clever and they despise a fool” John Lennon

          • misinformation

            “They hate you if you’re clever and they despise a fool”
            -John Lennon

            I’m not sure how you meant this, in context but, wouldn’t that Lennon quote be making the point you mentioned above, not refuting it?

          • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

            These men are fools, but New Age authors are often clever in their deceit… which sells a lot of books.

          • heinrich6666

            I wouldn’t put much in their sense of humor.

            As for Graham Hancock, I’d say he’s been ahead of the curve for the most part. He seems to popularize ‘woo-woo’ ideas just before they come in for cautious consideration by mainstream science. The idea he popularized of a comet impact around 10,500 years ago (mentioned in the interview); past advanced civilizations on the shorelines now submerged and underwater archaeology; prehistoric shamanism driven by hallucinogenics… These topics now show up with surprising regularity among legitimate science news items.

          • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

            I don’t know WTF you’re talking about… do you?

          • heinrich6666

            Didn’t think you would. In fact, I imagine coring out my rectum with a garden spade would be more pleasurable than discussing it with you.

          • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

            You’re probably right, and Graham Hancock is right about “The Face On Mars” being put there by Ancient Aliens. I only hope “Legitimate Science News” can keep with such a brilliant mind.

            http://www.consciousfrontiers.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/hancockted21.jpg

          • heinrich6666

            Mom? Is that you?

    • misinformation

      “- No.”
      “- Well anything’s possible, but probably not.”
      “- Based on the former I’m going to say no.”

      It’s hard to argue with the points you’ve made here. Wait. You didn’t make any points.

      • Neon Suntan

        You have links showing that Atlantis was a real place?

        • misinformation

          Is that actually your follow up?

  • heinrich6666

    Great interview.

  • http://lmgtfy.com/ jasonpaulhayes

    When Joe states and asks “We don’t know enough about their cultures, these don’t look like people who are struggling to feed themselves.. when you look at these monolithic structures, you wonder… what were they doing, how did they do this?” The answer he’s looking for is Slavery. We do know about their cultures, we can speak to what they were doing if we dare to.

    I suppose that when you’re a member of a debt slave economy, paying down a mortgage on sticks and paper, built on land you’ll never really own, and you “Trade in your Unwanted Gold for Cold Hard CASH”… you’re not really asking “what were they doing, how did they do this?”

  • Rhoid Rager

    This was a great podcast. I really enjoyed it. A fantastic episode would be J. Anthony West, G. Hancock, R. Carlson and Robert Schoch on all at the same time. But have them there for 6 hours with slides.

  • heinrich6666

    Har. Found that one relatively more even-handed.

  • Steve Garcia

    ~26:55 – “Then at 13,000 Younger Dryas was this climate spasm which ended the last ice age.” I believe this was an inadvertent misstatement. The YD was a spasm BACK to ice age conditions. The Younger Dryas was a STADIAL, not an interstadial. A stadial is a period of ice age conditions. I.e., the YD was a COLD period, not a warm spasm or a warm period. An interstadial is a warm period BETWEEN stadials. The latter part of that interstadial was a period called the Bolling-Allerod, and THAT had climate very much like the recent Holocene (the present geological age).

    ~26:05 – “At 26,000 years go we were in the latter phases of what appears to have been an interglacial period, not TOO much different from what we are in now.”

    ~26:44 – “Then at around 13,000 years ago… there was this enormous spasm of warming. And this seemed to be associated with rapid melting and the first real rapid sea level rise.”

    No, sorry. 13,000 yearrs ago was a spasm INTO a cold period. The Greenland GISP2 ice cores seem to show that the temps in Greenland dropped by about 9°C. That is NOT a warm spasm. None of that warming happened until the end of the Younger Dryas cold period (stadial), which happened at about 11,500 years ago. THAT was the warm spasm.

    The Younger Dryas BEGAN with a cold spasm, one that lasted 1300 years. The END of the YD ALSO was a spasm, but that time it was a WARM spasm. I hope that is clear.

    Unless you accept the impact hypothesis, the onset of the YD has no explanation, not within gradualism. And while the impact hypothesis may explain the onset of the YD, it does NOT explain the ending of the YD – which, as evidence now indicates actually happened FASTER than the VERY rapid onset. That ending is a complete mystery at this time.

    I will perhaps stop picking on his inaccuracies for a while. Maybe…

    I am actually on his side, but he just isn’t presenting the facts correctly.

  • Steve Garcia

    I don’t know about the rest of Randall’s spiel yet, but his info on the Younger Dryas and the Last Glacial Maximum is all jumbled in his head. He pulls numbers out of his head that are somewhat correct, but still they are incorrect enough that I have to just say this: “Take all of that with a grain of salt.”

    For example, [~29:00] The ice did NOT come down only to 45° north latitude, for one. It came down to about as far as Indianapolis, which is at about 39° north.

    Another example: [~30:45] The ice cores in Greenland do not go back 400,000 years. GISP2, the deepest one, goes down about 3,034 meters, and the last 200 meters are not readable reliably. The oldest datable part of it is at about 110,000 years. The deepest Antarctic core is about 50% deeper, but so far I haven’t seen numbers on it. But if it is somewhat close to the GISP2 core, it should only go back about 170,000 years or so, perhaps 200,000.

    This may not be Randall’s fault. If he is depending on climatologists, hahahahahahaha.

    In between the mistakes, Randall makes good points.

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