New York Public Library To Allow Patrons To ‘Check Out’ Free Internet Access

Partial map of the Internet based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org. Source: Matt Britt (CC)

Partial map of the Internet based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org. Source: Matt Britt (CC)

I’m personally of the opinion that the best possible thing that we could do would be to regulate the internet like a public utility and wire towns with free public hotspots here and there, especially now that you pretty much can’t get along in society without it. In the meantime, programs like these help to fill the gaps.

The New York Public Library is poised to allow its patrons to “check out” free, high-speed internet access, helping to bridge the digital divide between the rich and poor in the city.

With the help of a $500,000 grant awarded Monday from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the library will loan thousands of patrons portable “hot spot” devices that will connect their home computers and phones to high-speed internet. The program is scheduled to begin sometime this fall.

An NYPL survey indicated that 55% of patrons who used library computers had no home broadband access. That percentage zoomed to 65% for patrons who had household incomes of less than $25,000 a year. “In a world where access to the internet is necessary for almost any important task – applying for jobs, doing school work, paying bills – it is unacceptable that so many of the most vulnerable New Yorkers would be left behind,” said NYPL President Tony Marx.

The NYPL just completed a pilot program that lent Chromebook laptops and hot spot devices for two months at a time to 100 families with kids in after-school programs.

Before participating in the recent pilot program, Ajanay Smith, 10, was limited to doing computer-based home work at the library for 45 minutes a day, explained her mother, Nashawn Smith, of the South Bronx. “After your 45-minutes was up, you couldn’t get back on. Now she can do her work at home: She reads on it all the time,” said Smith, who has also found the hook-up helpful in her job search.

Ajanay’s internet literacy has improved and she has been able to research and write school assignments on panda bears and historical figures. “She’s good now! She knows how to hook up that computer by herself and doesn’t need my help,” Smith said.

Smith plans to renew the Chrome Book and broadband when they’re due for return on July 8. The program is important, she said, because her family has a limited budget: “Not everyone can afford a computer and internet,” Smith said. (Chrome Books will not be included in the new Knight Foundation-funded program.)

via NYPL to lend high speed internet devices to patrons – am New York.

, , , , ,

  • Echar Lailoken

    What’s the catch? Filtered access? If not, this is fantastic.

    • https://twitter.com/anti_euclidean ÿ

      Patrons will now have the opportunity to be spied on from the privacy of their own home.

      Market growth is slowing, so it must be time to (further) monetize the poor. Technology has matured (⸘teh zingularity‽ is nigh‽), so now the system can subsidize the “late adopters”. In return for further opting in, patrons will be able to reintegrate a new, digital version of basic human rights into their matrix.

      • Echar Lailoken

        I didn’t think of that. I wonder if it is filtered access, if it will be bloated with adverts.

  • kowalityjesus

    The TV stronghold of msm disinformation is disintegrating before our very eyes, and has been for a decade.

  • Mr B

    Wow; so this is a scheme to grant very fast internet access, to those computer literates, who currently use slower.

    Should help the video porn divide.

  • erte4wt4etrg

    To help patch them back into the world’s mixing board, i am my father’s screen.

21
More in Free internet, hot spots, Internet, New York Public Library, NYC NYPL
Communing with the Muse, Letting History be its Sexy Self and Coping with Tragedy. With Philosopher, Author and Top-Notch Human, Daniele Bolelli

Via Midwest Real "Once you lose attachment to how you want things to be because you realize you don't control anything, there's a curiously liberating aspect of that. I've always been...

Close