Supreme Court Declines To Intercede On Behalf Of Reporter James Risen: What’s Next?

state of warNew York Times reporter James Risen, author of “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration”, won’t give up one of his sources, and now that the Supreme Court won’t hear his case, he could be facing some serious prison time. The Washington Post has a run-down on what’s likely to happen now:

So what does this mean for Risen’s case? Will the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter be sent to prison? What does he have to say about the decision? And how does this fit into the Obama administration’s war on leaks? Here’s a primer on what is going on, where things stand and what could happen next.

Who is James Risen?

Risen is a reporter for the New York Times who writes about national security issues. In 2006, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his stories about the Bush administration’s domestic wiretapping program.  He continues to write about national security, and published a front-page story Sunday about how the National Security Agency is intercepting massive numbers of images shared to social media platforms to use in facial recognition programs. (This story, written with Laura Poitras, was based on documents obtained by Edward J. Snowden, the former contractor who leaked a trove of classified information to journalists.)

Why is he facing jail time in the first place?

Risen is the author of the 2006 book “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration.” A chapter of that book detailed a CIA plan to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program. Prosecutors believe that Jeffrey A. Sterling, a former Central Intelligence Agency operative charged with leaking classified information, gave Risen information that was used for this chapter.

via The Supreme Court won’t intervene in the James Risen case. What’s next?.

, , ,

  • BuzzCoastin

    this is a pissing contest between two elite factions
    it has nothing to do with this issues stated
    it’s a show to support the myth of a free press

    • InfvoCuernos

      That’s my read on it as well. Its become clear over the last decade or so that agents inside the CIA are consistently being “outed” by rival factions-that don’t necessarily follow party lines-as reprisal for something that the public is not privy to.

      • BuzzCoastin

        the only CIA doin time
        are those who revealed state secrets
        that the emperor has no cooth

        it might even be a fight between factions
        juz a plain ole psyop

  • aaron

    Oh the intelligence/police state supporting supreme court refuses to take a case that could be detrimental to the intelligence/police state?….You dont say?

  • Oginikwe

    Whistleblowers risk everything to do what they think is right and try to tell us what the public should know. They are modern day heroes to risk so much for so little. It makes me laugh when important men call out Snowden to “man up” and face the music. For one thing, he hasn’t revealed anything so far that we really didn’t already know. The news archives are full of people telling us what was going on long before Snowden hit the road. The Obama Administration did strengthen whistleblower laws but they don’t pertain to anyone involved in national security. Those people are discredited, ostracized, and crucified. The interests of the government should not overrule the freedom of the press in protecting their sources. We need to know what our government is doing in our name.

    • aaron

      While I agree ill admit I did chuckle a little bit when you said “our government” I dont really think its been ours for a long time but I know what you mean

      • Oginikwe

        I guess I should have said “our corporate captors.”
        [laughs ruefully]

  • Hadrian999

    there is no reason for the court to hear another case about constitutional grounds for reporters ignoring subpoena, it has been to the supreme court before. this reporter knew what he was getting into, he is either selfless and brave or stupid

21