Big Pharma’s Latest Trick: Testing Meds on Homeless People

Homeless Veteran on the streets of Boston, MA

Homeless Veteran on the streets of Boston, MA

Are the massive pharmaceutical corporations known collectively as “Big Pharma” now the world’s worst corporate villains? Carl Elliott writes of a dastardly plan to test trial medications on homeless people, at Medium:

Two years ago, on a gray January afternoon, I visited the Ridge Avenue homeless shelter in Philadelphia. I was looking for poor people who had been paid to test experimental drugs. The streets outside the shelter were lined with ruined buildings and razor wire, and a pit bull barked behind a chain-link fence. A young guy was slumped on the curb, glassy-eyed and shaky. My guide, a local mental health activist named Connie Schuster, asked the guy if he was okay, but he didn’t answer. “My guess is heroin,” she said.

We arrived at the shelter, where a security guard was patting down residents for weapons. It didn’t take long for the shelter employees to confirm that some of the people living there were taking part in research studies. They said that the studies are advertised in local newspapers, and that recruiters visit the shelter. “They’ll give you a sheet this big filled with pills,” a resident in the shelter’s day room told me the next day, holding up a large notebook. He had volunteered for two studies. He pointed out a stack of business cards on a desk next to us; they had been left by a local study recruiter. As we spoke, I noticed that an ad for a study of a new ADHD drug was running on a television across the room.

If you’re looking for poor people who have been paid to test experimental drugs, Philadelphia is a good place to start. The city is home to five medical schools, and pharmaceutical and drug-testing companies line a corridor that stretches northeast into New Jersey. It also has one of the most visible homeless populations in the country. In Philly, homeless people seem to be everywhere: sleeping in Love Park, slumped on benches in Suburban Station, or gathered along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, waiting for the free meals that a local church gives out on Saturdays.

On another occasion, I met former subjects at Chosen 300, a storefront church that serves meals to homeless people. The service had already started by the time I arrived, and raucous gospel music filled the bleak room. The congregation consisted of several dozen black men sitting on folding chairs. Many stared at the floor.

After the service I spoke to a thin young man in a dirty T-shirt who told me he had done an outpatient study for an anxiety drug. “Some kind of new benzo,” he said, as he devoured a bowl of Cheerios. (Benzodiazepines like Valium, Xanax, and Ativan are often prescribed for anxiety.)…

[continues at Medium]

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  • Oginikwe

    I hope there is a special level of hell for Big Pharma.

  • BuzzCoastin

    truth be told
    Pig Pharma only Alpha tests its drugs on the homeless
    butt it Beta tests its stuff on those with jobs, homes & health insurance

    • mannyfurious

      Word.

  • InfvoCuernos

    Big pharma would be the worst super villains if you could combine them with the mil/industry and the petrochemical concerns-oh wait, they call that the government.

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