Antidepressants May Affect Feelings of Love

Were their original feelings a product of their depression/anxiety? Are their new feelings a product of the antidepressants? Could their feelings be attributed to the natural ebb and flow of relationships?

via Live Science:

Taking antidepressants may affect people’s feelings of love and attachment, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that men’s feelings of love tended to be affected more than women’s by taking antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which work mainly through the serotonin system. In contrast, drugs called tricyclic antidepressants, which affect the serotonin system less, seem to affect women’s feelings of love more than men’s, the researchers said.

“The good news is that there are a variety of agents for treating depression,” said study author Dr. Hagop S. Akiskal, a distinguished professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

In the study, researchers compared the effects of SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants on the love lives of 192 people with depression — 123 women and 69 men — whose mean age was 41. The study included 13 people who were homosexual. All the people in the study said they had been in loving relationships for between seven months and 26 years.

“Indeed, our subjects were those who could be properly considered smitten by love,” Akiskal told Live Science.

The participants filled out a questionnaire that examined their feelings of love, attachment and sexual attraction to their partners throughout their relationships. On the questionnaire, the participants addressed whether their feelings were different after they started taking antidepressants, compared with before.

When the researchers looked at all the study participants, they found that those taking SSRIs were more likely to say they felt less at ease with sharing their partners’ thoughts and feelings, and less wishful that their love for their partner would last forever since they started taking their medication, compared with the people taking tricyclics.

They also found the men in the study taking SSRIs reported being less likely to ask their partners for help or advice, or take care of their partners, compared with women who had been taking SSRIs.

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  • Guest

    Too bad they don’t affect depression.

    • Damien Quinn

      I hate to be pedantic, but you should have said they don’t affect it positively. They’re incredibly effective at prolonging and exacerbating the problem.

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