Artists In Residence Inc.

air

A.I.R. Gallery’s new residence at 155 Plymouth Street DUMBO Brooklyn

A.I.R. Gallery, also known as Artists in Residence, Inc., first opened to the public in 1972.  Since then, the gallery has established itself as one of the unsung and under acknowledged cultural gems of New York City.

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Frustrated by the dearth of opportunities for women artists, and the wealth of quality work by their peers, 20 women artists established the first gallery for women artists in the United States at 97 Wooster Street in Soho, New York.

After forty-three years, A.I.R. Gallery remains a dynamic presence in the art world. As DUMBO has changed, with more galleries and arts organizations moving to (and leaving) Brooklyn, A.I.R.’s programming has grown to provide a wide range of exhibition opportunities, as well as career building, networking, and professional support for emerging and mid-career women artists.

The gallery’s new location, 155 Plymouth Street, will provide interior galleries and will showcase diverse artistic visions and artistic practices, a hallmark of A.I.R.’s artist-run model.

A.I.R. Gallery will open with the following exhibitions:

Daria Dorosh, Floating Plant Island, 2014, Dimensions variable

Daria Dorosh, Floating Plant Island, 2014, Dimensions variable

The Art of Sleep Daria Dorosh

May 5 – 31, 2015 Opening Reception: Thursday, May 7, 6 – 8pm Brooklyn, NY – April 2015

A.I.R. Gallery is delighted to present The Art of Sleep, an installation of new work by Daria Dorosh, New York based artist and co–founder of A.I.R. Gallery. This is Dorosh’s seventeenth solo show at A.I.R.

 The Art of Sleep weaves a bedtime story about a personal sleep ritual, which asks, can a creative ritual, inspired by art, elevate one’s self image before falling asleep, and thereby set the stage for a deeper sleep experience and richer waking life? The installation features fantastical textile and gemstone Night Jewelry, each on its own photo-perch for when it is not being worn; a Pond Bed covered with floating textile islands of silk flowers with lavender–filled pockets accented with quartz, tourmaline, and amethyst gemstones; a multi-colored textile Winding Garland studded with gemstones, to be worn for contemplation of the self and celebrate the body in all stages of life; and a gauze-like, linen Sleep Shirt.

Yvette Drury Dubinsky, Aleppo Drowning, 2015, Mixed media on watercolor and Japanese Paper, 31” diameter

Yvette Drury Dubinsky, Aleppo Drowning, 2015, Mixed media on watercolor and Japanese Paper, 31” diameter

Tondos, Tornadoes, Torpedoes Yvette Drury Dubinsky

May 5 – 31, 2015 Opening Reception: Thursday, May 7, 6 – 8pm Brooklyn, NY – April 2015

A.I.R. Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of recent work by Yvette Drury Dubinsky.  Dubinsky is known for her innovative combinations of drawing, print, alternative photography, and found objects. She makes collages and installations, skillfully integrating works on paper with industrial materials. In an intuitive process, Dubinsky uses paper discards as well as found ocean detritus to create artworks that reflect the toll of ecological waste and destruction. She combines them with street maps and representations of ocean life to comment on the precarious and intertwined state of our natural world. Dubinsky often uses a round format to emphasize these themes.

Sara Mejia Kriendler, In Line for the Shrine (Detail), 2015 Hydrocal, Styrofoam, 35 x 96 x 24”

Sara Mejia Kriendler, In Line for the Shrine (Detail), 2015 Hydrocal, Styrofoam, 35 x 96 x 24”

The Anthropocene Sara Mejia Kriendler.

May 5 – 31, 2015 Opening Reception: Thursday, May 7, 6 – 8pm Brooklyn, NY – April 2015

Artist Talk: May 7, 6:30pm

The exhibition features a series of relief sculptures, shrines, and idols and will be on view in the Fellowship Gallery from May 5 – 31, 2015.  The fodder for much of Kriendler’s work is post-consumer waste. She collects pieces of plastic and Styrofoam packaging and uses them as molds, filling their voids with plaster to translate the negative space into solid form. Kriendler places these plaster casts, many extracted from the packaging of dolls and mannequins, within a series of larger mixed-media sculptures. The title of the exhibition, The Anthropocene, refers to a geological term that is the subject of a heated debate within the scientific community: is the human imprint on this planet large enough to warrant the christening of a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene – an epoch named for us? “There is a slow, collective awakening to the fact that we live in a new era – an era in which our environmental and economic systems are at war,” says Kriendler. “What role will women play in the new era, and will they break the mold?” Casts of abstract female figures appear throughout the show. In one installation, In Line for the Shrine, a group of idols await their place at the center of an assemblage of plaster relief sculptures that play with the human imprint. The relief sculptures display the artist’s marks – stabbing and slashing – as well as the impressions of industrial objects and patterns.


For all inquiries, please contact; JoAnne McFarland, Co-Director.

The gallery is wheelchair accessible.

A.I.R. GALLERY | 155 Plymouth St. | Brooklyn, NY 11201 | airgallery.org | info@airgallery.org | (212) 255 6651 | Tues – Sun 12-6pm